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William S. Allen
Univeristy of Memphis
  1.  45
    Dead Transcendence: Blanchot, Heidegger, and the Reverse of Language.William S. Allen - 2009 - Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):69-98.
    In this essay I will examine the development of the notion of transcendence in Blanchot's early critical writings. Doing so indicates the radical way that Blanchot reconfigures this central ontological and theological term by way of his readings of the literary use of language. In turn this exposes the essential relation between finitude and literature, something which the second part of the essay will examine by way of Heidegger's study of the myth of Er.
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  2. Ellipsis: Of Poetry and the Experience of Language After Heidegger, Holderlin, and Blanchot.William S. Allen - 2007 - State University of New York Press.
    Examines poetic language in the work of Heidegger, Hölderlin, and Blanchot.
     
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  3.  10
    DIALECTICS IN TURMOIL: Adorno’s Literal Reading of Sade.William S. Allen - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):115-131.
    Consideration of the work of Sade in relation to Adorno usually refers to the much-discussed chapter from Dialektik der Aufklärung. But Adorno made a number of other remarks across his career that suggest a very different reading. I will discuss the three most significant of these remarks and show how they develop an approach to the libidinal aspect of aesthetic experience that challenges our understanding of the relation of thought and language. In doing so, Sade’s works indicate an extraordinary liberation (...)
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    The Absolute Milieu: Blanchot’s Aesthetics of Melancholy.William S. Allen - 2015 - Research in Phenomenology 45 (1):53-86.
    Unlike his other fictional works Blanchot’s 1953 narrative Celui qui ne m’accompagnait pas has received comparatively little attention. The reasons for this would seem to lie in the intense abstraction of his writing in this work, which is forbidding even by his own standards, but as I will show, this intensity can be understood as comprising a singular topography of the experience of writing. Blanchot’s narrative thereby becomes a very precise and concrete form of aesthetics, which can be usefully compared (...)
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  5.  4
    White Noise, Écriture Blanche.William S. Allen - 2018 - Angelaki 23 (3):28-41.
    Le Dernier Homme is Blanchot’s last narrative or récit. Afterwards, he would begin to write in a more fragmentary mode, which suggests that he may have felt that the narrative form had been pushed as far it could in this work. This point of extremity is marked in particular by the monotonous style for which he has become notorious. This essay examines why this style arises, and how it leads to an extreme that can be usefully contrasted with Barthes’s notion (...)
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  6. Aesthetics of Negativity: Blanchot, Adorno, and Autonomy.William S. Allen - 2020 - Fordham University Press.
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  7. Ellipsis: Of Poetry and the Experience of Language After Heidegger, Holderlin, and Blanchot.William S. Allen - 2008 - State University of New York Press.
    _Examines poetic language in the work of Heidegger, Hölderlin, and Blanchot._.
     
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