Results for 'William S. Bubelis'

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  1.  19
    Cardinal Newman and William Froude, F.R.S. A Correspondence.H. W. S. - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (5):139-139.
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  2.  19
    Hallowed Stewards: Solon and the Sacred Treasurers of Ancient Athens by William S. Bubelis.P. J. Rhodes - 2017 - American Journal of Philology 138 (3):555-558.
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  3.  5
    Hallowed Stewards: Solon and the Sacred Treasurers of Ancient Athens by William S. Bubelis.Claire Taylor - 2017 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 111 (1):156-157.
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  4.  3
    Not Only Laboratory to Clinic: The Translational Work of William S. C. Copeman in Rheumatology.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-27.
    Since the arrival of Translational Medicine, as both a term and movement in the late 1990s, it has been associated almost exclusively with attempts to accelerate the “translation” of research-laboratory findings to improve efficacy and outcomes in clinical practice. This framing privileges one source of change in medicine, that from bench-to-bedside. In this article we dig into the history of translation research to identify and discuss three other types of translational work in medicine that can also reshape ideas, practices, institutions, (...)
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  5.  9
    On Ray Johnson's Sexuality, Loves, and Friendships: An Interview Between William S. Wilson and Benjamin Kahan.Benjamin Kahan - 2018 - Angelaki 23 (1):85-87.
    This interview was conducted with one of the closest friends of the visual artist Ray Johnson, the late photographer and writer William S. Wilson. Johnson was a fixture of the New York downtown art scene in the late 1940, 1950s, and 1960s. He was influenced by Abstract Expressionists and Pop artists alike, but was a true original, widely considered to be the founder of “mail art” and also an important collagist and performance artist. Wilson helped Johnson to formulate the (...)
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  6.  62
    Mankind's Own Providence: From Swedenborgian Philosophy of Use to William James's Pragmatism.Paul Jerome Croce - 2007 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):490 - 508.
    : It is part of the conventional wisdom about the James family that the elder Henry James (1811–82) had a large influence on his son, William James (1842–1910), in the direction of religious interests. But William neither adopted his father's spirituality nor did he regard it as a foil to his own secularity. Instead, after first rejecting the elder James's idiosyncratic faith, he became increasingly intrigued with his insights into the natural world, which were in turn shaped by (...)
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  7. A Chronicle of Pragmatism in France Before 1907: William James in Renouvier’s Critique Philosophique.Mathias Girel - 2007 - In Sergio Franzese (ed.), Fringes of Religious Experience, Cross-Perspectives on James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. Ontos Verlag. pp. 169-200.
    In this paper, I'm giving an account of William James's reception in the columns of Charles Renouvier's journal, La Critique philosophique. The papers explores the discussions between James and Renouvier on Free Will, Philosophical systems, Consciousness and Pluralism.
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  8. The Unity of William James's Thought.Wesley Cooper - 2002 - Vanderbilt University Press.
    Wesley Cooper opposes the traditional view of William Jamesís philosophy which dismissed it as fragmented or merely popular, arguing instead that there is a systematic philosophy to be found in James's writings. His doctrine of pure experience is the binding thread that links his earlier psychological theorizing to his later epistemological, religious, and pragmatic concerns.
     
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  9.  62
    William James's "The Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation.Jennifer Welchman - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    William James's 'The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of sug­ gesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics con­ tinue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" con­ fuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs-not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of (...)
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  10. William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation.Jennifer Welchman - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of abandoning them. (...)
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  11. Divide Et Impera! William James’s Pragmatist Tradition in the Philosophy of Science.Alexander Klein - 2008 - Philosophical Topics 36 (1):129-166.
    ABSTRACT. May scientists rely on substantive, a priori presuppositions? Quinean naturalists say "no," but Michael Friedman and others claim that such a view cannot be squared with the actual history of science. To make his case, Friedman offers Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's theory of relativity as examples of admired theories that both employ presuppositions (usually of a mathematical nature), presuppositions that do not face empirical evidence directly. In fact, Friedman claims that the use of such presuppositions is (...)
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  12. Heaven’s Champion: William James’s Philosophy of Religion.James O. Pawelski - 1996 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (1):56-61.
    William James is notorious for the large number of inconsistencies and at least apparent contradictions in his writings. Many readers conclude that he should be appreciated more for his profound but erratic insights than for any coherent philosophical perspective. Ellen Kappy Suckiel disagrees. She argues that James is far more careful and systematic than many readers realize. Her work on James is guided by the attempt to lay bare his coherent philosophical vision and the consistent philosophical methodology underlying it. (...)
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  13.  66
    “I Walk Weeping in Pangs of a Mothers Torment for Her Children”: Women's Laments in the Poetry and Prophecies of William Blake.Steven P. Hopkins - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):39-81.
    Cross-cultural scholarship in ritual studies on women's laments provides us with a fresh vantage point from which to consider the function of women and women's complaining voices in the epic poems of William Blake. In this essay, I interpret Thel, Oothoon, and Enitharmon as strong voices of experience that unleash some of Blake's most profound meditations on social, sexual, individual, and institutional forms of violence and injustice, offering what might aptly be called an ethics of witness. Tracing the performative (...)
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  14. Remarks on R. B. Perry's Portrait of William James.Horace Meyer Kallen - 1937 - Philosophical Review 46 (1):68-78.
    Kallen's review of Ralph Barton Perry (1935) The Thought and Character of William James--in which he offers a pointed criticism.
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  15.  39
    William Ames's Calvinist Ambiguity Over Freedom of Conscience.James Calvin Davis - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):333 - 355.
    Reformed Christianity's qualified embrace of freedom of conscience is per- haps best represented by William Ames (1576-1633). This essay explores Ames's interpretation of conscience, his understanding of its relationship to natural law, Scripture, and civil authority, and his vacillation on the sub- ject of conscientious freedom. By rooting his interpretation of conscience in natural law, Ames provided a foundation for conscience as an authority whose convictions are binding and worthy of some civil respect and free- dom. At the same (...)
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  16.  64
    Review of Sergio Franzese, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus[REVIEW]Kenneth W. Stikkers - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
    Every scholar and reader of William James is aware of his frequent uses of "energy," especially in his discussions of ethics and most notably in his 1906 Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, "The Energies of Men".[1] But while other interpretations treat James's use of "energy" as merely one of his several folksy metaphors, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus is the first monograph, as its author, Sergio Franzese, rightly claims, to focus upon (...)
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  17.  38
    Experiments with Truth. A Sociological Variation on William James's Varieties of Religious Experience.Frédéric Vandenberghe - 2018 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 48 (1):31-47.
    William James's Varieties of Religious Experience is a classic psycho-philosophical study of the experience of the sacred and of its practical effects on the ordinary life of extraordinary persons. In a pragmatic variation of Kant's proof of god's existence, James uses personal accounts of converts to empirically demonstrate that there's “something” that has causal effects on the well-being of the person. While the article is largely sympathetic to James explorations of the mystical, it offers a sociological variation on the (...)
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  18.  57
    William James’s Concrete Analysis of Experience.Charlene Haddock Seigfried - 1992 - The Monist 75 (4):538-550.
    There are no signs of waning interest in William James's classic work, The Principles of Psychology as we enter the second century after its original publication in 1890. I think the time is right for undertaking the task of reconstructing his psychology, that is, his concrete or phenomenal findings, in light of his radically empiricist philosophical insights. The immediate problem for such a reappropriation is that James sharply distinguished between scientifically neutral descriptions of reality, such as are found in (...)
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  19. William James's Naturalistic Account of Concepts and His 'Rejection of Logic'.Henry Jackman - 2018 - In Philosophy of Mind in the Nineteenth Century: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 5. New York: Routledge. pp. 133-146.
    William James was one of the most controversial philosophers of the early part of the 20 century, and his apparent skepticism about logic and any robust conception of truth was often simply attributed to his endorsing mysticism and irrationality out of an overwhelming desire to make room for religion in his world-view. However, it will be argued here that James’s pessimism about logic and even truth (or at least ‘absolute’ truth), while most prominent in his later views, stem from (...)
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  20.  32
    A Non-Fideistic Reading of William James's "The Will to Believe".Ruth Weintraub - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):103 - 121.
    William James’ declared intention is to oppose Clifford’s claim that it “is wrong always, everywhere, and for every one, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence”. But I argue that he is confused about his doxastic prescriptions. He isn’t primarily concerned, as he thinks he is, with the legitimacy of belief in the absence of sufficient evidence. The most important contribution of his essay is a suggestion - a highly insightful and contentious one - as to what it is to (...)
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  21.  30
    Why Not One More Imponderable? John William Draper's Tithonic Rays.Klaus Hentschel - 2002 - Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):5-59.
    This paper reconstructs what may have led the American professorof chemistry andnatural philosophy John William Draper to introduce a new kind ofradiation, whichhe dubbed `Tithonic rays''. After presenting his and earlierempirical findings onthe chemical action of light in Section 3, I analyze his pertinentpapers in Section 4with the aim of identifying the various types of argumentshe raised infavor of this new actinic entity (or more precisely, this newnatural kind of raybesides optical, thermal and perhaps also phosphorogenic rays).From a modernperspective, (...)
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  22. William James's Pragmatism : A Distinctly Mixed Bag.Bruce Wilshire - 2009 - In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
     
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  23.  16
    Hegel, Reason, And The Overdeterminacy Of God Review Of William Desmonds, Hegel's God: A Counterfeit Double?Dennis Schulting - 2005 - Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 51:83-96.
    Review essay on William Desmond's critical account of Hegel's philosophy of God.
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  24.  8
    Ontology After Philosophical Psychology: The Continuity of Consciousness in William James's Philosophy of Mind by Michela Bella.Russell J. Duvernoy - 2020 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 56 (1):105-109.
    Michela Bella’s Ontology after Philosophical Psychology: The Continuity of Consciousness in William James’s Philosophy of Mind offers a detailed survey of James’s thought using “continuity” as its focal lens. Because the book presumes significant familiarity with James and frequently includes dense exegesis of his work’s most technical aspects, it is primarily for specialists. It will particularly interest James scholars studying the entanglement of the metaphysical with the psychological and epistemological.Combining “historical” and “theoretical” points of view, Bella tracks “James’s gradual (...)
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  25.  75
    Seeking the Center of Truth's Forest: William James in California, 1898. Colella - 2013 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):348.
    “Philosophical Conceptions and Practical Results” has long been recognized for the special place that it occupies in the history of American philosophy. In it, American pragmatism enters into a wider, popular consciousness for the first time, acquiring both its name and its lineage. In the course of a brief hour with George Holmes Howison’s Philosophical Union at Berkeley in August of 1898, in a gymnasium before an audience of eight hundred people, pragmatism also acquires its living voice as William (...)
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  26.  69
    Eino Kaila on Pragmatism and Religion: An Introduction to Kaila's 1912 Essay on William James. Pihlströöm - 2011 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2):146.
    American pragmatism was, in the beginning of the twentieth century, a major movement not only in its home country but also in other parts of the globe as well, largely (but not exclusively) thanks to William James’s (1842–1910) international activity. In Europe, Italian and French philosophers, in particular, established their own pragmatist “schools,” and pragmatism also spread to the northern parts of the continent, including Germany and the Scandinavian countries. Even in the relatively remote Finland, Jamesian pragmatism rapidly became (...)
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  27.  10
    James Campbell's Experiencing William James.Todd Lekan - 2019 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 55 (1):51.
    Jim Campbell's new book Experiencing William James: Belief in a Pluralistic World is one of the best philosophical examinations of all areas of William James' work through a close sympathetic attention to the James texts themselves. Campbell writes well and demonstrates a deep familiarity with James' corpus. Moreover, Campbell has a good command of the writings of James' interlocutors and venerable commentators. I recommend keeping a bookmark on the endnotes. They constitute an entire bonus text, reminding me of (...)
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  28.  1
    From the Archives: William Richardson’s Questions for Martin Heidegger’s “Preface”.William J. Richardson, Richard Capobianco & Ian Alexander Moore - 2019 - Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 9:1-27.
    Martin Heidegger wrote one and only one preface for a scholarly work on his thinking, and it was for William J. Richardson’s study Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought, first published in 1963. Ever since, both Heidegger’s Preface and Richardson’s groundbreaking book have played an important role in Heidegger scholarship. Much has been discussed about these texts over the decades, but what has not been available to students and scholars up to this point is Richardson’s original comments and questions to (...)
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  29. William P. Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience: The Problem of Subjectivism.William Mckenith - 2004 - Dissertation, Drew University
    William P. Alston's book, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience , challenges the contemporary view that religious experience is purely subjective. He theorizes that a direct experiential awareness of God can produce immediately justified beliefs about God. Accordingly, this dissertation critically assesses the problem of subjectivism thought to taint Alston's epistemology of religious experience. ;Upon disclosing the prevalence of subjectivity, and identifying the potential for objectivity in religious experience, this treatise produces a viable resolve for objectivity in mystical (...)
     
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  30.  14
    William of Sherwood's Treatise on Syncategorematic Words.William Sherwood - 1968 - Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.
    Translator's Introduction This book may be studied independently, but in several respects it is a companion volume to my William of Sherwood's Introduction ...
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  31.  4
    The Bridegroom’s Kiss in the Song of Songs. The Commentaries of Bernard of Clairvaux and William of Saint-Thierry.Francesca Pullano - 2020 - Doctor Virtualis 15:61-92.
    Il _Cantico dei Cantici _occupa un posto d'onore nella tradizione monastica e nella teologia mistica; i commenti scritti da Bernardo di Chiaravalle e da Guglielmo di Saint-Thierry esercitarono una grande influenza sulla filosofia mistica occidentale. L’articolo si concentra principalmente sul significato teoretico della filosofia monastica e il suo scopo è mostrare l'importanza del bacio come immagine della massima unione mistica tra Dio e l'anima umana nei commenti di Guglielmo e Bernardo. L'allegoria del bacio è anche analizzata e inserita nel contesto (...)
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  32. William S. Robinson, Brains and People: An Essay on Mentality and Its Causal Conditions Reviewed By.William Seager - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (6):252-255.
     
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  33.  19
    William S. Anderson : Why Horace? A Collection of Interpretations. Pp. Xv + 255. Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., 1999. Paper, $40. ISBN: 0-86516-434-7. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (2):399-399.
  34.  83
    Pragmatism Without Progress: Affect and Temporality in William James’s Philosophy of Hope.Bonnie Sheehey - 2019 - Contemporary Pragmatism 16 (1):40-64.
    Philosophers and intellectual historians generally recognize pragmatism as a philosophy of progress. For many commentators, pragmatism is tied to a notion of progress through its embrace of meliorism – a forward-looking philosophy that places hope in the future as a site of possibility and improvement. I complicate the progressive image of hope generally attributed to pragmatism by outlining an alternative account of meliorism in the work of William James. By focusing on the affectivity and temporality of James’s meliorism, I (...)
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  35.  9
    Modern Science and the Nature of Life [by William S. Beck]. [REVIEW]William B. Bean - 1958 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 1 (4):457-458.
  36. William S. Robinson, Computers, Minds, and Robots.S. Cherian & W. O. Troxell - 1996 - Minds and Machines 6:407-412.
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  37.  27
    Response to William Lane Craig’s God Over All.Peter van Inwagen - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):267-275.
    In contrast to William Lane Craig’s view this article presents a sort of precis of my position on ontological commitment—whether you call it neo-Quineanism or not—and its implications for the nominalism-realism debate, a precis that proceeds from first principles.
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  38.  17
    The Professor and the Pea: Lives and Afterlives of William Bateson’s Campaign for the Utility of Mendelism.Gregory Radick - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):280-291.
    As a defender of the fundamental importance of Mendel’s experiments for understanding heredity, the English biologist William Bateson did much to publicize the usefulness of Mendelian science for practical breeders. In the course of his campaigning, he not only secured a reputation among breeders as a scientific expert worth listening to but articulated a vision of the ideal relations between pure and applied science in the modern state. Yet historical writing about Bateson has tended to underplay these utilitarian elements (...)
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  39.  31
    William J. Morgan’s ‘Conventionalist Internalism’ Approach. Furthering Internalism? A Critical Hermeneutical Response.Francisco Javier López Frías - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):157-171.
    Several authors, such as William J. Morgan, John S. Russell and R. Scott Kretchmar, have claimed that the limits between the diverse normative theories of sport need to be revisited. Most of these works are philosophically grounded in Anglo-American philosophical approaches. For instance, William J. Morgan’s proposal is mainly based on Richard Rorty’s philosophy. But he also discusses with some European philosophers like Jürgen Habermas. However, Habermas’ central ideas are rejected by Morgan. The purpose of this paper is (...)
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  40.  19
    The Worthless Remains of a Physician’s Calling: Max Weber, William Osler, and the Last Virtue of Physicians.Abraham Nussbaum - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (6):419-429.
    On the centenary of Max Weber’s “Science as a Vocation,” his essay still performs interpretative work. In it, Weber argues that the vocation of a scientist is to produce specialized, rationalized knowledge that will be superseded. Weber says this vocation is a rationalized version of the Protestant conception of calling or vocation, tragically disenchanting the world and leaving the idea of calling as a worthless remains. A similar trajectory can be seen in the physician William Osler’s writings, especially his (...)
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  41.  16
    William Whewell’s Philosophy of Architecture and the Historicization of Biology.Aleta Quinn - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 1 (59):11-19.
    William Whewell’s work on historical science has received some attention from historians and philosophers of science. Whewell’s own work on the history of German Gothic church architecture has been touched on within the context of the history of architecture. To a large extent these discussions have been conducted separately. I argue that Whewell intended his work on Gothic architecture as an attempt to (help) found a science of historical architecture, as an exemplar of historical science. I proceed by analyzing (...)
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  42.  91
    Response to William Lane Craig’s Review of Where the Conflict Really Lies.Alvin Plantinga - 2013 - Philosophia Christi 15 (1):175-179.
    I try to clear up a couple of misunderstandings in William Craig’s review. The first has to do with the difference between what I call “Historical Biblical Criticism” and historical scholarship. I claim there is conflict between the first and Christian belief; I don’t for a moment think there is conflict between historical scholarship and Christian belief. The second has to do with Platonism, theism and causality. I point out that theism has the resources to see abstract objects as (...)
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  43.  12
    William Bateson's Introduction of Mendelism to England: A Reassessment.Robert Olby - 1987 - British Journal for the History of Science 20 (4):399-420.
    The recognition of Gregor Mendel's achievement in his study of hybridization was signalled by the ‘rediscovery’ papers of Hugo de Vries, Carl Correns and Erich Tschermak. The dates on which these papers were published are given in Table 1. The first of these—De Vries ‘Comptes rendus paper—was in French and made no mention of Mendel or his paper. The rest, led by De Vries’ Berichte paper, were in German and mentioned Mendel, giving the location of his paper. It has long (...)
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  44.  15
    Avicenna’s Ex-Uno-Principle in William of Auvergne’s De Trinitate.Katrin Fischer - 2015 - Quaestio 15:423-432.
    William of Auvergne is one of the first Latin thinkers to discuss Avicenna’s cosmological theory of emanation and with it the famous principle «ex uno, secundum quod est unum, non est nisi unum». He accepts the validity of this principle itself, but vehemently rejects its use in the field of cosmology to explain God’s acting as the universe’s creator. Within the context of Trinitarian theology, however, William applies the ex-uno-principle to explain two core issues concerning the emanation of (...)
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  45.  91
    Localization and the New Phrenology: A Review Essay on William Uttal's the New Phrenology. [REVIEW]Anthony Landreth & Robert C. Richardson - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):107-123.
    William Uttal's The new phrenology is a broad attack on localization in cognitive neuroscience. He argues that even though the brain is a highly differentiated organ, "high level cognitive functions" should not be localized in specific brain regions. First, he argues that psychological processes are not well-defined. Second, he criticizes the methods used to localize psychological processes, including imaging technology: he argues that variation among individuals compromises localization, and that the statistical methods used to construct activation maps are flawed. (...)
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  46.  17
    Ancient Hunters and Their Modern Representatives: William Sollas’s Anthropology From Disappointed Bridge to Trunkless Tree and the Instrumentalisation of Racial Conflict.Marianne Sommer - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):327-365.
    During the first decades of the 20th century, many anthropologists who had previously adhered to a linear view of human evolution, from an ape via Pithecanthropus erectus and Neanderthal to modern humans, began to change their outlook. A shift towards a branching model of human evolution began to take hold. Among the scientific factors motivating this trend was the insight that mammalian evolution in general was best represented by a branching tree, rather than by a straight line, and that several (...)
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  47.  61
    William A. Dembski’s Argument for Detecting Design Through Specified Complexity.Juuso Loikkanen - 2015 - Philosophy and Theology 27 (2):289-306.
    This paper analyzes William A. Dembski’s theory of intelligent design. According to Dembski, it is possible to empirically detect signs of intelligence in the world by examining properties of observed events. In order to detect design, Dembski has developed the criterion of specified complexity, by means of which he claims to be able to distinguish events that are designed from those that are caused by necessity or chance. Five problems regarding Dembski’s theory are identified and discussed. It is revealed (...)
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  48.  33
    Thomas Reid’s Newtonian Theism: His Differences with the Classical Arguments of Richard Bentley and William Whiston.Robert Callergård - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (2):109-119.
    Reid was a Newtonian and a Theist, but did he found his Theism on Newton’s physics? In opposition to commonplace assumptions about the role of Theism in Reid’s philosophy, my answer is no. Reid prefers to found his Theism on a priori reasons, rather than on physics. Reid’s understanding of physics as an empirical science stops it from contributing in any clear and efficient way to issues of natural theology. In addition, Reid is highly sceptical of our ability to discover (...)
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  49. William Poteat’s Anthropology.Walter B. Mead - 1994 - Tradition and Discovery 21 (1):33-44.
    Using the metaphor of a circle with its center, periphery, and radius, this essay explores William Poteat's understanding of the self, or "mindbody," in its dynamic and creative relation to the larger world, or cosmos, identifying the mindbody's prereflective radix with the "center," its boundary or point of interface with the larger world with the "periphery," and its dialectical evolution and articulation of a sense of coherence and meaning in terms of a pretensive and retrotensive "radius.".
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  50.  56
    William James’s Social Evolutionism in Focus. McGranahan - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (3):80.
    It is well known that William James’s thinking was influenced by evolutionary theory and by Darwin’s theory of natural selection in particular. It is easy to misunderstand James’s evolutionary thinking, however, if one is tempted to read contemporary evolutionary views back into James. In this article I try to avoid such anachronism by carefully distinguishing James’s evolutionary views from some of their nearest conceptual neighbors. I focus in particular on James’s social evolutionism, especially as he expounds it in his (...)
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