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  1.  68
    Internalization and Moral Demands.William Sin - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 157 (2):163-175.
    How should we assess the burden of moral demands? A predominant assessment is provided by what Murphy calls the baseline of factual status-quo (FSQ): A moral theory is demanding if the level of agents’ well-being is reduced from the time they begin to comply perfectly with the theory. The aims of my paper are threefold. I will first discuss the limits of the FSQ baseline. Second, I suggest a different assessment, which examines moral demands from a whole-life perspective. My view (...)
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  2.  25
    Caring for Parents: A Consequentialist Approach.William Sin - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):3-10.
    In this paper, I explain the demands of filial obligations from act and rule consequentialism. More specifically, I defend a rule-consequentialist explanation of filial obligations, and identify a few factors in relation to the determination of filial demands; they include the costs of internalization of filial obligations, and the proportions of the young and the old generations in a population pyramid. I believe that in a society with an aging population, we may accept a strong view of filial obligation. Towards (...)
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  3.  32
    Trivial Sacrifices, Great Demands.William Sin - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1):3-15.
    Suppose that people in the affluent countries can easily save the lives of the starving needy in poor countries. Then, three points seem to follow. First, it is wrong for these people not to make the easy rescue . Second, it is wrong to stop making the easy rescue even if they have made many rescues already . Third, if we accept the first two points, the demands of morality are super-extreme. That is, people have to keep making trivial sacrifices (...)
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  4.  15
    The Demandingness of Confucianism in the Case of Long-Term Caregiving1.William Sin - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (2):166-179.
    Trends of recent demographical development show that the world's population is aging at its fastest clip ever. In this paper, I ask whether adult children should support the life of their chronically ill parents as long as it takes, and I analyze the matter with regard to the doctrine of Confucianism. As the virtue of filial piety plays a central role in the ethics of Confucianism, adult children will face stringent demands while giving care to their chronically ill parents. In (...)
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  5.  6
    Confucianism, Rule‐Consequentialism, and the Demands of Filial Obligations.William Sin - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (2):377-393.
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  6.  18
    Adult Children’s Obligations Towards Their Parents: A Contractualist Explanation.William Sin - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (1):19-32.
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  7.  13
    Wu Song’s Killing of His Sister-in-Law: An Ethical Analysis.William Sin - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (2):231-246.
    The Water Margin is a great Chinese classical novel; Wu Song’s 武松 killing of his sister-in-law, Pan Jinlian 潘金蓮, is one of the most popular episodes of the novel. It depicts Wu as the hero and defender of traditional values, and Pan as the adulterous woman. In contemporary discussion, there has been a dearth of ethical analyses regarding Wu’s killing of Pan. How should we judge the moral status of his action? Does the killing signify Wu Song’s ethical achievement or (...)
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  8.  13
    The Water Margin, Moral Criticism, and Cultural Confrontation.William Sin - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):95-111.
    The Water Margin is one of the four great classical novels of China. It describes how people from different walks of life were driven to become outlaws as a result of poor governance and widespread corruption. These outlaws have been regarded by some commentators as heroes, despite the fact that they perform wanton killing, over retribution, and cannibalism. Liu Zaifu 劉再復 argues that the novel has contributed to the moral downfall of the Chinese people. In this essay, I put forward (...)
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  9. Brill Online Books and Journals.William Sin - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1).
     
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