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  1. The Evolution and Psychology of Self-Deception.William von Hippel & Robert Trivers - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):1.
    In this article we argue that self-deception evolved to facilitate interpersonal deception by allowing people to avoid the cues to conscious deception that might reveal deceptive intent. Self-deception has two additional advantages: It eliminates the costly cognitive load that is typically associated with deceiving, and it can minimize retribution if the deception is discovered. Beyond its role in specific acts of deception, self-deceptive self-enhancement also allows people to display more confidence than is warranted, which has a host of social advantages. (...)
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  2. Protesting Too Much: Self-Deception and Self-Signaling.Ryan McKay, Danica Mijovi??-Prelec, Dra?? en Prelec, William von Hippel & Robert Trivers - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):34.
    Von Hippel & Trivers (VH&T) propose that self-deception has evolved to facilitate the deception of others. However, they ignore the subjective moral costs of deception and the crucial issue of credibility in self-deceptive speech. A self-signaling interpretation can account for the ritualistic quality of some self-deceptive affirmations and for the often-noted gap between what self-deceivers say and what they truly believe.
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  3.  37
    Reflections on Self-Deception.William von Hippel & Robert Trivers - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):41-56.
    Commentators raised 10 major questions with regard to self-deception: Are dual representations necessary? Does self-deception serve intrapersonal goals? What forces shape self-deception? Are there cultural differences in self-deception? What is the self? Does self-deception have costs? How well do people detect deception? Are self-deceivers lying? Do cognitive processes account for seemingly motivational ones? And how is mental illness tied up with self-deception? We address these questions and conclude that none of them compel major modifications to our theory of self-deception, although (...)
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  4.  38
    Self-Deception is Adaptive in Itself.Louisa C. Egan, William von Hippel & Robert Trivers - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):19.
    Von Hippel & Trivers reason that the potential benefits of successfully deceiving others provide a basis for the evolution of self-deception. However, as self-deceptive processes themselves provide considerable adaptive value to an individual, self-deception may have evolved as an end in itself, rather than as the means to an end of improving other-deception.
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    Evolutionary Explanations Need to Account for Cultural Variation.Steven J. Heine, William von Hippel & Robert Trivers - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):26.
    Cultural variability in self-enhancement is far more pronounced than the authors suggest; the sum of the evidence does not show that East Asians self-enhance in different domains from Westerners. Incorporating this cultural variation suggests a different way of understanding the adaptiveness of self-enhancement: It is adaptive in contexts where positive self-feelings and confidence are valued over relationship harmony, but is maladaptive in contexts where relationship harmony is prioritized.
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    Belief in God and in Strong Government as Accidental Cognitive by-Products.Peter Kramer, Paola Bressan, William von Hippel & Robert Trivers - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):31.
    Von Hippel & Trivers (VH&T) interpret belief in God and belief in strong government as the outcome of an active process of self-deception on a worldwide scale. We propose, instead, that these beliefs might simply be a passive spin-off of efficient cognitive processes.
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    A Social Psychological Perspective.William von Hippel - 1994 - Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):397 – 399.
  8.  1
    Goals Are Not Selfish.William von Hippel & Frank A. von Hippel - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):157-158.