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Wilson H. Shearin [3]Wilson Shearin [1]
  1. Deleuze and the Enaction of Nonsense.William Short, Alistair Welchman & Wilson Shearin - 2014 - In Tom Froese & Massimiliano Cappuccio (eds.), Enactive Cognition at the Edge of Sense-Making. pp. 238-265.
    This chapter examines the ways in which French philosopher Gilles Deleuze offers conceptual resources for an enactive account of language, in particular his extensive consideration of language in The Logic of Sense. Specifically, Deleuze’s distinction between the nonsense of Lewis Carroll’s portmanteau creations and that of Antonin Artaud’s “transla- tion” of Carroll’s Jabberwocky highlights the need for an enactive, rather than merely embodied, approach to sense-making, particularly with regard to the general category of what Jakobson and Halle (1956) call “sound (...)
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  2.  14
    Misunderstanding Epicurus? A Nietzschean Identification.Wilson H. Shearin - 2014 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (1):68-83.
    “Our acts shall be misunderstood [falsch verstanden], as Epicurus is misunderstood! […] I want to be misunderstood for a long time”.1 So proclaims Nietzsche in a notebook passage from 1883, thereby making one of several positive claims for identification with the Hellenistic Greek philosopher from Samos.2 Epicurus, the full remark suggests, was untimely—misunderstood, unappreciated by his contemporaries—much as Nietzsche himself aims to be untimely; and this point is hardly the only moment of convergence between the two thinkers. Although he is (...)
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  3.  23
    (M.R.) Gale (Ed., Trans.) Lucretius: De Rerum Natura V. (Aris & Phillips Classical Texts.) Pp. Viii + 222,. Figs. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2009. Paper, £18, US$36 (Cased, £40, US$80). ISBN: 978-0-85568-889-8 (978-0-85568-884-3 Hbk). [REVIEW]Wilson H. Shearin - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (2):614-615.
  4.  6
    Lucretian Receptions: History, The Sublime, Knowledge.Wilson H. Shearin - 2012 - American Journal of Philology 133 (3):532-535.
    Students of Latin literature need no introduction to the work of Philip Hardie. Although he has written on topics across the classical canon, he is perhaps best known as an influential critic of Virgil. His 1986 book, Virgil’s Aeneid: Cosmos and Imperium, which traces the Aeneid’s articulation of Roman imperial ideology in cosmological idiom, remains, whatever one’s position on its arguments, a central monument within recent Virgilian criticism. One achievement of that work is its demonstration of how Virgil’s epic is (...)
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