Results for 'Winston T. H. Koh'

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  1.  84
    Is Specialization Desirable in Committee Decision Making?Ruth Ben-Yashar, Winston T. H. Koh & Shmuel Nitzan - 2012 - Theory and Decision 72 (3):341-357.
    Committee decision making is examined in this study focusing on the role assigned to the committee members. In particular, we are concerned about the comparison between committee performance under specialization and non-specialization of the decision makers. Specialization (in the context of project or public policy selection) means that the decision of each committee member is based on a narrow area, which typically results in the acquirement and use of relatively high expertise in that area. When the committee members’ expertise is (...)
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  2.  19
    A Short Critical History of Architecture. By H. Heathcote Statham. London: B. T. Batsford.F. T. - 1914 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 34:160-161.
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  3.  10
    Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture.H. Samani, E. Saadatian, N. Pang, D. Polydorou, O. N. N. Fernando, R. Nakatsu & J. T. K. V. Koh - unknown
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  4.  22
    The Physical Philosophy of Aristotle: A Modern Interpretation.R. H. T. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):584-585.
    Since the bulk of this book is devoted to paraphrasing Aristotle's physical views for modern ears, it would have been more correctly styled an exposition or synopsis. As such, the work is of some value and may prove particularly helpful as an introduction. Though many of his expository comments are quite sensitive, the author takes for granted an uncritical acceptance of nineteenth century mechanics in those passages which attempt critical assessment of peripatetic natural science.—R. H. T.
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  5.  29
    Le sens musculaire et Les sensations de mouvement: D'après G. H. lewes.G. Lewes & C. T. - 1878 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 6:63 - 67.
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  6.  20
    Istoria Ths Ellhnikhs Dhmosias Oikonomias, Tomos B, Meros A': H Dhmosia Oikonomia Tou Megalou Alecandrou.W. W. T. & A. M. Andreades - 1930 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:164.
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  7. MARSHALL, H. R. -Consciousness. [REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1911 - Mind 20:126.
  8.  79
    T.H. Morgan, Neither an Epistemological Empiricist nor a “Methodological” Empiricist.Marga Vicedo - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (3):293-311.
    T. H. Morgan (1866–1945), the founder of the Drosophila research group in genetics that established the chromosome theory of Mendelian inheritance, has been described as a radical empiricist in the historical literature. His empiricism, furthermore, is supposed to have prejudiced him against certain scientific conclusions. This paper aims to show two things: first, that the sense in which the term empiricism has been used by scholars is too weak to be illuminating. It is necessary to distinguish between empiricism as an (...)
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  9.  56
    Philosophical Ideas and Scientific Practice: A Note on the Empiricism of T.H. Morgan. [REVIEW]N. Roll-Hansen - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (1):69-76.
    In a reply to Marga Vicedo the philosophical inconsistency of Morgan is emphasized. It is argued that even if a strict classification of scientists according to their philosophical position is not possible, their science may still be influenced by their philosophical ideas. Finally it is suggested that philosophical ideas influence science less by a direct effect on the scientists than indirectly through science policy and administration.
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  10. A New Scheme of Positive and Negative Freedom: Reconstructing T. H. Green on Freedom.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (4):508-532.
    This article offers a new scheme of the relation between positive and negative freedom that is based on a retrieval of T. H. Green's theory of freedom and on further reconstructions of his theory. Some of the distinctions in the literature have proven difficult to sustain, and this has resulted in a weakening of the dichotomy in principle, and of the concepts of positive and negative freedom independently of each other. The main distinction between negative and positive freedom offered here (...)
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  11.  49
    Promoting F.A.I.T.H. In Peer Review: Five Core Attributes of Effective Peer Review. [REVIEW]Leigh Turner - 2003 - Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):181-188.
    Peer review is an important component of scholarly research. Long a black box whose practical mechanisms were unknown to researchers and readers, peer review is increasingly facing demands for accountability and improvement. Numerous studies address empirical aspects of the peer review process. Much less consideration is typically given to normative dimensions of peer review. This paper considers what authors, editors, reviewers, and readers ought to expect from the peer review process. Integrity in the review process is vital if various parties (...)
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  12.  60
    Generosity and Property in Aristotle's Politics: T. H. IRWIN.T. H. Irwin - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):37-54.
    Etymology might encourage us to begin a discussion of Aristotle on philanthropy with a discussion of philanthropia ; and it is instructive to see why this is not quite the right place to look. The Greek term initially refers to a generalized attitude of kindness and consideration for a human being. The gods accuse Prometheus of being a ‘human-lover’, intending the term in an unfavorable sense, when he confers on human beings the benefits that should have been confined to the (...)
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  13.  37
    Tradition and Reason in the History of Ethics: T. H. IRWIN.T. H. Irwin - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (1):45-68.
    Students of the history of ethics sometimes find themselves tempted by moderate or extreme versions of an approach that might roughly be called ‘historicist’. This temptation may result from the difficulties of approaching historical texts from a ‘narrowly philosophical’ point of view. We may begin, for instance, by wanting to know what Aristotle has to say about ‘the problems of ethics’, so that we can compare his views with those of Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Sidgwick, and Rawls, and then decide what (...)
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  14.  44
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green.David O. Brink - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    David Brink presents a study of T. H. Green's Prolegomena to Ethics (1883), a classic of British idealism. Green develops a perfectionist ethical theory that brings together the best elements in the ancient and modern traditions and that provides the moral foundations for Green's own influential brand of liberalism. Brink's book situates the Prolegomena in its intellectual context, examines its main themes, and explains Green's enduring significance for the history of ethics and contemporary ethical theory.
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  15. T.H. Green's Moral and Political Philosophy: A Phenomenological Perspective.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2001 - Palgrave.
    This book offers a new phenomenological interpretation of T.H. Green's (1836-1882) philosophy and political theory. By analyzing his theory of human practice, the moral idea, the common good, freedom and human rights, the book demonstrates that Green joins the same tradition as Kantian and Husserlian transcendentalism. The book offers a reconstruction of Green's idealism and demonstrates its potential to address contemporary debates on the nature of moral agency, positive and negative freedom and on justifying human rights.
     
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  16.  89
    Time as Non‐Observational Knowledge: How to Straighten Out ΔEΔt≥H.Constantin Antonopoulos - 1997 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (2):165 – 183.
    The Energy-Time Uncertainty (ETU) has always been a problem-ridden relation, its problems stemming uniquely from the perplexing question of how to understand this mysterious Δ t . On the face of it (and, indeed, far deeper than that), we always know what time it is. Few theorists were ignorant of the fact that time in quantum mechanics is exogenously defined, in no ways intrinsically related to the system. Time in quantum theory is an independent parameter, which simply means independently known (...)
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  17.  25
    Reconciling Faith and Reason: T. H. Green’s Theory of Human Agency.Adrian Paylor - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 79 (1-2):156-177.
    The Victorian age was a period in which Christian Orthodoxy was undermined by new and emerging forms of reasoned inquiry. The commonly-held view amongst historians is that the intellectual life in the era was composed of two hostile camps; those who defended Christian Orthodoxy and those who championed the new sciences. The received view is that, when faced by the new fields of reasoned inquiry, Christianity’s prominence within British intellectual life and discourse went into terminal decline. The intention of this (...)
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  18. T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy.Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the great English idealist thinker T. H. Green (1836-82) as philosophers have begun to overturn received opinions of his thought and to rediscover his original and important contributions to ethics, metaphysics, and political philosophy. This collection of essays by leading experts, all but one published here for the first time, introduces and critically examines his ideas both in their context and in their relevance to contemporary debates.
     
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  19.  18
    T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy.Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the great English idealist thinker T. H. Green (1836-82) as philosophers have begun to overturn received opinions of his thought and to rediscover his original and important contributions to ethics, metaphysics, and political philosophy. This collection of essays by leading experts, all but one published here for the first time, introduces and critically examines his ideas both in their context and in their relevance to contemporary debates.
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  20.  73
    T. H. Green, Kant, and Hegel on Free Will.William J. Mander - 2012 - Idealistic Studies 42 (1):69-89.
    Scholars have remained undecided how much the British Idealists owe to Hegel, how much to Kant, and how much they may be credited with minting a new intellectual coinage of their own. By way of a detailed examination of T. H. Green’s metaphysics of free will and how it stands to both its Kantian and its Hegelian predecessors, this paper attempts to make some headway on that longstanding question of pedigree. It is argued that by translating previously naturalistic considerations about (...)
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  21. T.H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom: From Metaphysics to Political Theory (Review).James W. Allard - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):538-539.
    Although T. H. Green is primarily remembered today as a moral and political philosopher, many of his philosophical concerns owe their origins to the Victorian crisis of faith in which a widespread belief in the literal truth of Scripture confronted seemingly incompatible scientific theories. Green attributed this crisis to the inability of science and religion to find accommodation in the popular version of empiricism widely accepted by educated men and women of his day. In his 371-page introduction to Hume’s Treatise, (...)
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  22.  8
    Idealism and Revolution: T.H. Green's Four Lectures on the English Commonwealth.Duncan Kelly - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (3):505-542.
    In January 1867 T.H. Green gave a series of Four Lectures on the English Commonwealth to the Edinburgh Philosophical Institute, which were then published, on the testimony of 'competent judges', in the third volume of his Collected Works edited by R.L. Nettleship. Green's family background ensured that he had strong interests in the history of Puritanism and the figure of Oliver Cromwell, and he was thoroughly immersed in many of the political and religious controversies of the later quarter of the (...)
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  23.  16
    The Moral Philosophy of T. H. Green.T. H. Green & Geoffrey Thomas - 1987 - Ethics 101 (1):194-195.
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  24.  86
    Freedom From, in and Through the State: T.H. Marshall's Trinity of Rights Revisited.Zygmunt Bauman - 2005 - Theoria 44 (108):13-27.
    Each one of T.H. Marshall's trinity of human rights rested on the state as, simultaneously, its birth place, executive manager and guardian. And no wonder. At the time Marshall tied personal, political and social freedoms into a historically determined succession of won/bestowed rights, the boundaries of the sovereign state marked the limits of what humans could contemplate, and what they thought they should jointly do, in order to make their world more user-friendly. The state enclosed territory was the site of (...)
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  25. Self-Realization and the Common Good : Themes in T.H. Green.David O. Brink - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  26.  9
    T. H. Huxley on Education.Cyril Bibby & T. H. Huxley - 1972 - British Journal of Educational Studies 20 (3):352-353.
  27.  12
    The Feminism of T. H. Green: A Late-Victorian Success Story?O. Anderson - 1991 - History of Political Thought 12 (4):671.
    Rather surprisingly, T.H.Green's ideas on women and the family are as neglected today as they were immediately after his death in 1882, when his thought was first interpreted for a wider public by his colleagues and friends.1 Silence on such matters in the 1880s is not remarkable. It is odd, however, that it persists today, despite recent intense concern with the history of women and the family, including their place in political thought, and despite reviving philosophical interest in the British (...)
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  28.  37
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green.Daniel Dombrowski - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):425-426.
    Brink reminds us that T. H. Green’s Prolegomena to Ethics is a neglected classic in the history of ethics, comparable to F. H. Bradley’s Ethical Studies and Henry Sidgwick’s Methods of Ethics. This is saying quite a bit when it is considered that no less a figure than John Rawls has claimed that Sidgwick’s version of utilitarianism is the most sophisticated and carefully reasoned to date. On Green’s view, however, perfectionism is the main rival in ethical theory to utilitarianism. Green (...)
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  29.  19
    Isoi and Homoioi: Equality and Sameness in T.H. Greens Theory of Rights Recognition.Matt Hann - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (4):496-517.
    T.H. Green argues that rights cannot exist, save for in a society in which people recognise each other as “ἴσοι καὶ ὅμοιοι.” Green leaves the phrase untranslated, and there is a certain ambiguity about what exactly Green meant and a lack of attention to this stipulation in the secondary literature. This essay argues that equality and sameness in Green must be understood as two categorically different criteria, both of which must be satisfied in order to make rights recognition possible. Further, (...)
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  30.  37
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green (Review).Phillip Ferreira - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):369-370.
    Phillip Ferreira - Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 43.3 369-370 David O. Brink. Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003. Pp. xiv + 139. Cloth, $27.50. The British idealists have not fared well during the past century. Still, there has been in recent years a renewed interest in the movement's (...)
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  31.  12
    The Politics of Conscience: T H Green and His Age. [REVIEW]Colin Tyler - 1997 - Bradley Studies 3 (2):192-198.
    On its first publication, Stuart Hampshire opened his review of Melvin Richter’s Politics of Conscience with the claim that, “T H Green, who died in 1882, is a minor figure in the history of philosophy.” Hampshire continued.
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  32.  21
    T. H. Green’s Philosophical Manuscripts: An Annotated Catalog.C. A. Smith - 1979 - Idealistic Studies 9 (2):178-184.
    T. H. Green was born April 7, 1836, and died in his forty-seventh year on March 26, 1882. He was appointed to lecture in ancient and modern history at Balliol College on April 11, 1860, and was awarded a fellowship at Balliol on November 30th of that year. For the last four years of his life, he was Whyte’s Professor of Moral Philosophy, Oxford University. Apart from one short interruption as an assistant commissioner of schools and several as a result (...)
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  33.  11
    Freedom From, In and Through the State: T.H. Marshall's Trinity of Rights Revisited.Zygmunt Bauman - 2005 - Theoria 52:13-27.
    Each one of T.H. Marshall's trinity of human rights rested on the state as, simultaneously, its birth place, executive manager and guardian. And no wonder. At the time Marshall tied personal, political and social freedoms into a historically determined succession of won/bestowed rights, the boundaries of the sovereign state marked the limits of what humans could contemplate, and what they thought they should jointly do, in order to make their world more user-friendly. The state enclosed territory was the site of (...)
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  34.  14
    Double Recognition: Persons and Rights in T.H. Green.M. Hann - 2015 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 21 (1):63-80.
    The work of T.H. Green provides a justificatory argument for human rights which is a powerful alternative to the still prevailing account of rights, which sees them as somehow tied to human nature and argues that humans have rights qua humans, and independent of society. Green's account of rights turns on the process of social recognition. However, the precise mechanism for recognition is left slightly ambiguous. This paper argues that recognition in Green can be usefully divided into two stages, 'recognition (...)
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  35.  30
    T.H. Green as a Phenomenologist: Linking British Idealism and Continental Phenomenology.Maria Dimova - 1998 - Angelaki 3 (1):77 – 88.
    (1998). T.H. Green as a phenomenologist: linking British idealism and continental phenomenology. Angelaki: Vol. 3, Impurity, authenticity and humanity, pp. 77-88.
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  36.  13
    Athens. The Athenian Agora: Results of Excavations Conducted by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens., Vol. Viii. Late Geometric and Protoattic Pottery, Mid 8th to Late 7th Century B.C. By E. T. H. Brann. Princeton, N.J.: American School at Athens. 1962. Pp. Xiv + 134. 46 Plates. 9 Text Figures. $12.50. [REVIEW]J. N. Coldstream, Athens & E. T. H. Brann - 1964 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 84:216-218.
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  37.  11
    Ball, Bosanquet and the Legacy of T.H. Green.M. Carter - 1999 - History of Political Thought 20 (4):674-694.
    This paper challenges the commonplace view of T.H. Green and his followers: that they divided politically into left and right groups depending on their views of socialism, state action and the individual. By examining in detail the work of Green's followers, Bernard Bosanquet and Sidney Ball, this paper shows that there was, in fact, a broad consensus between the two on questions of the role of the state. This has significant implications for the understanding of idealism, the work of Bosanquet (...)
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  38.  7
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green. [REVIEW]Daniel Dombrowski - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):425-426.
    Brink reminds us that T. H. Green’s Prolegomena to Ethics is a neglected classic in the history of ethics, comparable to F. H. Bradley’s Ethical Studies and Henry Sidgwick’s Methods of Ethics. This is saying quite a bit when it is considered that no less a figure than John Rawls has claimed that Sidgwick’s version of utilitarianism is the most sophisticated and carefully reasoned to date. On Green’s view, however, perfectionism is the main rival in ethical theory to utilitarianism. Green (...)
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  39.  8
    Studies and Documents Relating to the History of the Greek Church and People Under Turkish Domination. By T. H. Papadopoullos. Brussels: Bibliotheca Graeca Aevi Posterions, 1952. Pp. Xxiv + 507. Price Not Stated. [REVIEW]C. A. Trypanis & T. H. Papadopoullos - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:244-244.
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  40.  4
    A New Scheme Of Positive And Negative Freedom: Reconstructing T. H. Green on Freedom.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2003 - Philosophy Today 31 (4):508-532.
    This article offers a new scheme of the relation between positive and negative freedom that is based on a retrieval of T. H. Green's theory of freedom and on further reconstructions of his theory. Some of the distinctions in the literature have proven difficult to sustain, and this has resulted in a weakening of the dichotomy in principle, and of the concepts of positive and negative freedom independently of each other. The main distinction between negative and positive freedom offered here (...)
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  41.  5
    T. H. Green’s Philosophical Manuscripts: An Annotated Catalog.C. A. Smith - 1979 - Idealistic Studies 9 (2):178-184.
    T. H. Green was born April 7, 1836, and died in his forty-seventh year on March 26, 1882. He was appointed to lecture in ancient and modern history at Balliol College on April 11, 1860, and was awarded a fellowship at Balliol on November 30th of that year. For the last four years of his life, he was Whyte’s Professor of Moral Philosophy, Oxford University. Apart from one short interruption as an assistant commissioner of schools and several as a result (...)
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  42. T. H. Green On Property And Moral Responsibility.David Crossley - 2003 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 6.
    In his lectures in the 1870s, T. H. Green argued for an important connection between ethics and politics - namely, that the state has the moral function of promoting and protecting all citizens’ opportunities of developing their moral character. How this works out in a concrete case is best seen by considering Green’s view of how this perspective dictates to society’s design of its property institution. This paper analyzes Green’s theory of property so as to bring out and explore his (...)
     
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  43. T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy.Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the great English idealist thinker T. H. Green as philosophers have begun to overturn received opinions of his thought and to rediscover his original and important contributions to ethics, metaphysics, and political philosophy. This collection of essays by leading experts, all but one published here for the first time, introduces and critically examines his ideas both in their context and in their relevance to contemporary debates.
     
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  44. Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green.David O. Brink - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David Brink presents a study of T. H. Green's classic Prolegomena to Ethics and its role in his philosophical thought. Green is one of the two most important figures in the British idealist tradition, and his political writings and activities had a profound influence on the development of Liberal politics in Britain. The Prolegomena is his major philosophical work. It begins with his idealist attack on empiricist metaphysics and epistemology and develops a perfectionist ethical theory that aims to bring together (...)
     
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  45. Rights That Bind : T.H. Green on Rights and Community.Avital Simhony - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  46. Unnatural Rights: T. H. Green on Rights and Community.Avital Simhony - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.), T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
  47. Contesting the Common Good : T.H. Green and Contemporary Republicanism.Colin Tyler - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  48. Metaphysics and Ethics in the Philosophy of T.H. Green.Andrew Vincent - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  49. Review of Alan H. Goldman, Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. [REVIEW]Ben Eggleston - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (1):113-115.
    A review of Alan H. Goldman, _Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don’t_ (Cambridge University Press, 2002), pp. xi + 210.
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  50. H.O.T. Theory, Concepts, and Synesthesia: A Reply to Adams and Shreve.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (4):443-448.
    In response to Fred Adams and Charlotte Shreve’s (2016) paper entitled “What Can Synesthesia Teach Us about Higher Order Theories of Consciousness?”, previously published in Symposion, I argue that H.O.T. theory does have the resources to account for synesthesia and the specific worries that they advance in their paper, such as the relationship between concepts and experience and the ability to handle instances of ‘pop-out’ experiences.
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