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  1.  28
    On Thinging Things and Serving Services: Technological Mediation and Inseparable Goods. [REVIEW]Wolter Pieters - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):195-208.
    In our high-tech society, the design process involves profound questions about the effects of the resulting goods, and the responsibilities of designers. In the philosophy of technology, effects of “things” on user experience and behaviour have been discussed in terms of the concept of technological mediation. Meanwhile, what we create has moved more and more towards services (processes) rather than products (things), in particular in the context of information services. The question is raised to what extent the concept of technological (...)
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  2.  19
    Refining the Ethics of Computer-Made Decisions: A Classification of Moral Mediation by Ubiquitous Machines.Marlies Van de Voort, Wolter Pieters & Luca Consoli - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (1):41-56.
    In the past decades, computers have become more and more involved in society by the rise of ubiquitous systems, increasing the number of interactions between humans and IT systems. At the same time, the technology itself is getting more complex, enabling devices to act in a way that previously only humans could, based on developments in the fields of both robotics and artificial intelligence. This results in a situation in which many autonomous, intelligent and context-aware systems are involved in decisions (...)
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  3.  41
    Explanation and Trust: What to Tell the User in Security and AI? [REVIEW]Wolter Pieters - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (1):53-64.
    There is a common problem in artificial intelligence (AI) and information security. In AI, an expert system needs to be able to justify and explain a decision to the user. In information security, experts need to be able to explain to the public why a system is secure. In both cases, an important goal of explanation is to acquire or maintain the users’ trust. In this paper, I investigate the relation between explanation and trust in the context of computing science. (...)
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  4.  12
    Security-by-Experiment: Lessons From Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace.Wolter Pieters, Dina Hadžiosmanović & Francien Dechesne - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):831-850.
    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly safety-related, meaning that potential harm is caused by the design plus accidental events in the environment. In some domains, such as cyberspace, adversarial agents may be at least as important when it comes to undesirable effects of deployed technologies. In (...)
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  5.  5
    Temptations of Turnout and Modernisation.Wolter Pieters & Robert van Haren - 2007 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 5 (4):276-292.
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  6.  24
    Reve{a,I}Ling the Risks.Wolter Pieters - 2010 - Techne 14 (3):194-206.
    In information security research, perceived security usually has a negative meaning, when it is used in contrast to actual security. From a phenomenological perspective, however, perceived security is all we have. This paper develops a phenomenological account of information security, in which a distinction is made between revealed and reveiled security instead. Linking these notions with the concepts of confidence and trust, the paper provides a phenomenological explanation of the electronic voting controversy in the Netherlands.
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  7.  4
    Wanting It All – Public Perceptions of the Effectiveness, Cost, and Privacy of Surveillance Technology.Michelle Cayford, Wolter Pieters & P. H. A. J. M. van Gelder - 2019 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society.
    Purpose This study aims to explore how the public perceives the effectiveness of surveillance technology, and how people’s views on privacy and their views on effectiveness are related. Likewise, it looks at the relation between perceptions of effectiveness and opinions on the acceptable cost of surveillance technology. Design/methodology/approach For this study, surveys of Dutch students and their parents were conducted over three consecutive years. Findings A key finding of this paper is that the public does not engage in a trade-off (...)
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  8.  15
    Reve{a,I}Ling the Risks: A Phenomenology of Information Security.Wolter Pieters - 2010 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 14 (3):194-206.
    In information security research, perceived security usually has a negative meaning, when it is used in contrast to actual security. From a phenomenological perspective, however, perceived security is all we have. This paper develops a phenomenological account of information security, in which a distinction is made between revealed and reveiled security instead. Linking these notions with the concepts of confidence and trust, the paper provides a phenomenological explanation of the electronic voting controversy in the Netherlands.
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