Search results for 'Woman (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nancy Tuana (1992). Woman and the History of Philosophy. Paragon House.
  2. Karin Stögner (2007). The Woman and the Past : On Walter Benjamin's Philosophy of History and its Meaning for Film. In Vera Apfelthaler & Julia Köhne (eds.), Gendered Memories: Transgressions in German and Israeli Film and Theatre. Turia + Kant.
  3.  4
    L. D. Derksen (1996). Dialogues on Women: Images of Women in the History of Philosophy. Vu University Press.
  4.  13
    Ann A. Pang-White (2009). Chinese Philosophy and Woman: Is Reconciliation Possible? American Philosophical Association Newsletter 9 (1):1-2.
    Is a reconciliation possible between Chinese philosophy and woman when taking into account infamous gender-oppressive cultural practices such as foot-binding, concubinage, etc., in premodern Chinese societies? The article tackles the complexity of the subject by calling the readers' attention to texts from Confucian classics that indeed support intellectual equality of the sexes and classless access to education, while noting diverging historical cultural evidences of women's education and their social status in premodern, modern, and postmodern Chinese societies. The article challenges (...)
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  5.  52
    Penelope Deutscher (1997). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.
    Yielding Gender explores and reconsiders the tensions that deconstruction poses for feminist philosophy. Emphasizing the important role of deconstruction in revealing the ambiguity and unstable nature of gender, Penelope Deutscher asks the crucial question: does the very instability of gender mean that we can no longer talk of a man or a woman of reason in the history of philosophy? Using the work of Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, Deutscher explores this question by examining the issue (...)
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  6. Penelope Deutscher (2002). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.
    Traditional accounts of the feminist history of philosophy have viewed reason as associated with masculinity and subsequent debates have been framed by this assumption. Yet recent debates in deconstruction have shown that gender has never been a stable matter. In the history of philosophy 'female' and 'woman' are full of ambiguity. What does deconstruction have to offer feminist criticism of the history of philosophy? _Yielding Gender_ explores this question by examining three crucial areas; the issue of (...)
     
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  7.  23
    Kelly Oliver (1994). Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy's Relation to the "Feminine". Routledge.
    In ____Womanizing Nietzsche,__ Kelly Oliver uses an analysis of the position of woman in Nietzsche's texts to open onto the larger question of philosophy's relation to the feminine and the maternal. Offering readings from Nietzsche, Derrida, Irigaray, Kristeva, Freud and Lacan, Oliver builds an innovative foundation for an ontology of intersubjective relationships that suggests a new approach to ethics.
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  8.  22
    Claire Colebrook (1997). Feminist Philosophy and the Philosophy of Feminism: Irigaray and the History of Western Metaphysics. Hypatia 12 (1):79 - 98.
    Irigaray demonstrates that metaphysics depends upon the specific negation and exclusion of the female body. Readings of Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman tend to highlight the status of this excluded materiality: is there an essential female body which precedes negation or is the feminine only an effect of exclusion? I approach Irigaray's work by way of another question: is it possible to move beyond a feminist critique of metaphysics and towards a feminist philosophy?
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  9. Polly Welts Kaufman (2002). National Parks and the Woman's Voice: A History. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):548-548.
     
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  10. Charles E. Snyder (2016). Becoming Like a Woman. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):1-19.
    Interpreters of Theaetetus are prone to endorse the view that a god gave Socrates maieutic skill. This paper challenges that view. It provides a different account of the skill’s origins, and reconstructs a genealogy of Socratic philosophy that begins and has its end in human experience. Three distinct origins coordinate to bring forth a radically new conception of philosophy in the image of female midwifery: the state of wonder, the exercise of producing, examining and disavowing beliefs in the gradual cultivation (...)
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  11.  22
    Beverley Clack (ed.) (1999). Misogyny in the Western Philosophical Tradition: A Reader. Routledge.
    From some of the great philosophers of the Western tradition: "The Devils gateway" --Tertullian "A misbegotten male" --Aquinas "Big children their whole life long" --Schopenhauer The roots of philosophical misogyny in the writings of thinkers from the ancient Greeks through the modern age are exposed and explored in this collection. Beverley Clack questions whether the wisdom of these philosophers can be separated from the misogyny, and whether feminists should seek an alternative to the Western philosophical canon. This collection offers chronological (...)
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  12. Ron Bombardi (2012). The Blue Light Was My Baby and the Red Light Was My Mind : Religion and Gender in the Blues. Lady Sings the Blues : A Woman's Perspective on Authenticity / Meghan Winsby ; Even White Folks Get the Blues / Douglas Langston and Nathaniel Langston ; Distributive History : Did Whites Rip-Off the Blues? / Michael Neumann ; Whose Blues? Class, Race, and Gender in American Vernacular Music. In Jesse R. Steinberg & Abrol Fairweather (eds.), Blues -- Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking Deep About Feeling Low. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  13. A. L. A. L. (1978). Michelet's Poetic Vision. A Romantic Philosophy of Nature, Man, and Woman. By Edward K. Kaplan. [REVIEW] History and Theory 17 (3):395.
     
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  14.  3
    Konrad Fuchs (1988). The Jewish Woman in Graeco-Roman Antiquity. Philosophy and History 21 (2):214-215.
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  15.  6
    Margaret M. Nash (1997). Nietzsche, a Woman's Line. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1/2):107-121.
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  16.  15
    Eileen O'Neill (2006). Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):122-124.
    Eileen O'Neill - Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.1 122-124 Sarah Hutton. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. viii + 271. Cloth, $75.00. In 1690 a Latin translation of a philosophical treatise, originally written in English by Anne Conway , was published anonymously. The English manuscript did not survive, but in 1692 the Latin version of Conway's (...)
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  17.  3
    Daniel Whistler (2014). Howie's Between Feminism and Materialism and the Critical History of Religions. Sophia 53 (2):183-192.
    This essay traces the notion of abstraction through the works of Gillian Howie as a means of thinking through the nature of critique within philosophy of religion. In particular, it argues that Howie’s recovery of a more productive conception of abstraction in her late Between Feminism and Materialism is closely linked to the resurgence of real abstraction in recent Marxist theory. From these shifts, one can derive both an enriched conception of religion as real abstraction and a method of critical (...)
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  18.  19
    Nancy Tuana (1993). The Less Noble Sex Scientific, Religious, and Philosophical Conceptions of Woman's Nature.
    "This highly-readable work traces a set of beliefs about the nature of woman that have informed, and in turn have been reinforced by, science, religion, and philosophy from the classical period to the nineteenth century.... [T]his book’s analysis lends support to claims that the gender system affected our very conceptions of science." —Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences "An important book for the educated general public as well as for scholars in many disciplines. Highly recommended." —Library (...)
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  19.  14
    J. Romero Carrasquillo Francisco & K. Troyer de Romero Hilaire (2013). Aquinas on the Inferiority of Woman. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):685 - 710.
    Aquinas has been accused of being a sexist for making the following four claims about woman: woman is a deficient male; woman was created only for the purpose of procreation; woman is inferior to man; woman must submit to man. Some scholars, notably Michael Nolan, have attempted to defend Thomas, and a few have even gone so far as calling him a feminist. The aim of this paper is to show that Aquinas did hold these (...)
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  20. Umberto Eco & Alastair McEwen (eds.) (2005). History of Beauty. Rizzoli.
    What is beauty? What is art? What is taste and fashion? Is beauty something to be observed coolly and rationally or is it something dangerously involving? So begins Umberto Eco's intriguing journey into the aesthetics of beauty, in which he explores the ever-changing concept of the beautiful from the ancient Greeks to today. While closely examining the development of the visual arts and drawing on works of literature from each era, Eco broadens his enquiries to consider a range of concepts, (...)
     
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  21.  7
    Prudence Allen (1997). The Concept of Woman. W.B. Eerdmans.
    v. 1. The Aristotelian revolution, 750 BC-AD 1250 -- v. 2. The early humanist Reformation, 1250-1500.
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  22.  20
    Margaret Urban Coyne (1981). The Nature of Woman. International Philosophical Quarterly 21 (1):117-118.
  23.  11
    Paulette W. Kidder (2004). The Concept of Woman, Vol. II. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (1):151-157.
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  24.  24
    Sarah Borden (2006). Edith Stein's Understanding of Woman. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):171-190.
    This essay looks at Edith Stein’s descriptions of the fundamental equality, yet distinct differences between women and men, and attempts to make clear the ontology underlying her claims. Stein’s position—although drawing from the general Aristotelian-Thomistic position—differs from Thomas Aquinas’s, and she understands gender as tied significantly to our form or soul. The particular way in which gender is “written into” our soul, however, differs from the way in which both our humanity and individuality are tied to our soul. Thus, Stein (...)
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  25.  18
    Prudence Allen (1992). A Woman and a Man as Prime Analogical Beings. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 66 (4):465-482.
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  26.  6
    Mary Rousseau (1999). The Concept of Woman. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 73 (4):639-642.
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  27.  10
    Maryellen MacGuigan (1973). Is Woman a Question? International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (4):485-505.
  28.  11
    W. Norris Clarke (2003). The Concept of Woman, Vol. II. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (2):246-247.
  29.  28
    Sandrine Berges (2013). Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft's A Vindiciation of the Rights of Woman. Routledge.
    Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the greatest philosophers and writers of the Eighteenth century. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Her most celebrated and widely-read work is A Vindication of the Rights of Woman . This Guidebook introduces: Wollstonecraft’s life and the background to A Vindication of the Rights of Woman The ideas and text of A Vindication of the (...)
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  30.  59
    Graham Harman (2012). Object-Oriented France: The Philosophy of Tristan Garcia. Continent 2 (1):6-21.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 6–21. The French philosopher and novelist Tristan Garcia was born in Toulouse in 1981. This makes him rather young to have written such an imaginative work of systematic philosophy as Forme et objet , 1 the latest entry in the MétaphysiqueS series at Presses universitaires de France. But this reference to Garcia’s youthfulness is not a form of condescension: by publishing a complete system of philosophy in the grand style, he has already done what none of us (...)
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  31.  32
    Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  32.  13
    Robert Mayhew (1999). Behavior Unbecoming a Woman. Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):89-104.
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  33.  3
    Pamela Sue Anderson, Michèle Le Doeuff's "Primal Scene": Prohibition and Confidence in the Education of a Woman.
    My essay begins with Michèle Le Doeuff's singular account of the "primal scene" in her own education as a woman, illustrating a universally significant point about the way in which education can differ for men and women: gender difference both shapes and is shaped by the imaginary of a culture as manifest in how texts matter for Le Doeuff. Her primal scene is the first moment she remembers when, while aspiring to think for herself, a prohibition is placed in (...)
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  34.  4
    Rozena Maart (2014). Race and Pedagogical Practices: When Race Takes Center Stage in Philosophy. Hypatia 29 (1):205-220.
    This paper presents a segment of a broader research project titled “When Black Consciousness Meets White Consciousness,” which first developed out of my research work with White women in violence-against-women organizations. It documents an interview between a White woman and me, a Black South African philosopher. I lived and worked in Canada at the time but I traveled to the United States for conferences on a regular basis. I was presenting my work on Black consciousness, White consciousness, and Black (...)
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  35. Sandrine Berges (2013). The Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft's a Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Routledge.
    Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the greatest philosophers and writers of the Eighteenth century. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Her most celebrated and widely-read work is _A Vindication of the Rights of Woman_. This Guidebook introduces: Wollstonecraft’s life and the background to _A Vindication of the Rights of Woman_ The ideas and text of _A Vindication of the Rights of Woman_ (...)
     
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  36.  5
    Cressida J. Heyes (ed.) (2011). Philosophy and Gender. Routledge.
    How are ‘philosophy’ and ‘gender’ implicated? Throughout history, philosophers—mostly men, though with more women among their number than is sometimes supposed—have often sought to specify and justify the proper roles of women and men, and to explore the political consequences of sexual difference. The last forty years, however, have seen a dramatic explosion of critical thinking about how philosophy is a gendered discipline; there has also been an abundance of philosophical work that uses gender as a central analytic category. (...)
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  37. I. Israel Jonathan (2001). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750. Oxford University Press UK.
    Arguably the most decisive shift in the history of ideas in modern times was the complete demolition during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries - in the wake of the Scientific Revolution - of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, culminating in Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. In this revolutionary process which effectively overthrew all justicfication for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance (...)
     
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  38. M. Cahn Steven (2011). Classic and Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press USA.
    Now even more affordably priced in its second edition, Classic and Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Education is ideal for undergraduate and graduate philosophy of education courses. Editor Steven M. Cahn, a highly respected contributor to the field, brings together writings by leading figures in the history of philosophy and notable contemporary thinkers. The first section of the book provides material from nine classic writers: Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Whitehead, and Dewey. Their historically important works (...)
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  39. Trista Selous (ed.) (2007). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Cambridge University Press.
    "To be a philosopher and to be a feminist are one and the same thing. A feminist is a woman who does not allow anyone to think in her place."-from _Hipparchia's Choice_ A work of rare insight and irreverence, _Hipparchia's Choice_ boldly recasts the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the post-Derrideans as one of masculine texts and male problems. The position of women, therefore, is less the result of a hypothetical "femininity" and more the fault of (...)
     
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  40.  88
    Brandon Look (2002). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650-1750 (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):399-400.
    In the wake of the Scientific Revolution, the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the complete demolition of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, including Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. The Radical Enlightenment played a part in this revolutionary process, which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance of education, and slavery. Despite the present day interest in the revolutions (...)
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  41.  15
    Stewart Lockie, Jen Hayward & Nell Salem (2002). Carol J. Adams. The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory, Tenth Anniversary Edition; Kathryn Paxton George. Animal, Vegetable, or Woman? A Feminist Critique of Ethical Vegetarianism; Michael Allen Fox. Deep Vegetarianism. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):361-363.
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  42.  7
    George P. Klubertanz (1971). "Woman: A Contemporary View," by F. J. J. Buytendijk, Trans. Denis J. Barrett. Modern Schoolman 48 (2):214-215.
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  43.  17
    Alice Sowaal (2008). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):322-323.
    Project MUSE - Journal of the History of Philosophy - Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination Project MUSE Journals Journal of the History of Philosophy Volume 46, Number 2, April 2008 Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination Journal of the History of Philosophy Volume 46, Number 2, April 2008 E-ISSN: 1538-4586 Print ISSN: 0022-5053 DOI: 10.1353/hph.0.0014 Reviewed by Alice SowaalSan Francisco State University Patricia Springborg. Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University (...)
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  44.  17
    Alice Sowaal (2008). Mary Astell. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Project MUSE - Journal of the History of Philosophy - Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination Project MUSE Journals Journal of the History of Philosophy Volume 46, Number 2, April 2008 Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination Journal of the History of Philosophy Volume 46, Number 2, April 2008 E-ISSN: 1538-4586 Print ISSN: 0022-5053 DOI: 10.1353/hph.0.0014 Reviewed by Alice SowaalSan Francisco State University Patricia Springborg. Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University (...)
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  45.  18
    Alice Sowaal (2008). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 322-323.
    Project MUSE - Journal of the History of Philosophy - Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination Project MUSE Journals Journal of the History of Philosophy Volume 46, Number 2, April 2008 Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination Journal of the History of Philosophy Volume 46, Number 2, April 2008 E-ISSN: 1538-4586 Print ISSN: 0022-5053 DOI: 10.1353/hph.0.0014 Reviewed by Alice SowaalSan Francisco State University Patricia Springborg. Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University (...)
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  46.  4
    J. Gusmano (1989). Postponements: Woman, Sensuality, and Death in Nietzsche. By David Farrell Krell. Modern Schoolman 66 (3):243-245.
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  47.  5
    Howard P. Kainz (1969). The Relationship of Dread to Spirit in Man and Woman, According to Kierkegaard. Modern Schoolman 47 (1):1-13.
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  48. Mary Beth Morrissey (2011). Expanding Consciousness of Suffering at the End of Life. Schutzian Research 3:79-106.
    This analysis explores the phenomenology of suffering and temporal, genetic and social developmental aspects of suffering for seriously ill older adults. A phenomenological account of suffering is advanced using oral history data from in-depth interviews with a seriously ill, frail elderly woman. The analysis evaluates how a phenomenological account of suffering may inform ethics in end-of-life decision making, and may provide a further basis for an integrated ethical and gerontological response to suffering in palliative social work practice with (...)
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  49. Christine James (1997). Feminism and Masculinity: Reconceptualizing the Dichotomy of Reason and Emotion. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 17 (1/2):129-152.
    In the context of feminist and postmodern thought, traditional conceptions of masculinity and what it means to be a “Real Man” have been critiqued. In Genevieve Lloyd's The Man of Reason, this critique takes the form of exposing the effect that the distinctive masculinity of the “man of reason” has had on the history of philosophy. One major feature of the masculine-feminine dichotomy will emerge as a key notion for understanding the rest of the paper: the dichotomy of reason-feeling, (...)
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  50. Kelly Oliver & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1998). Feminist Interpretations of Friedrich Nietzsche. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Nietzsche has the reputation of being a virulent misogynist, so why are feminists interested in his philosophy? The essays in this volume provide answers to this question from a variety of feminist perspectives. The organization of the volume into two sets of essays, "Nietzsche's Use of Woman" and "Feminists' Use of Nietzsche," reflects the two general approaches taken to the issue of Nietzsche and woman. First, many debates have focused on how to interpret Nietzsche's remarks about women and (...)
     
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