Results for 'Word'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Bibliography: Words in Philosophy of Language
  1. Polysemy and Word Meaning: An Account of Lexical Meaning for Different Kinds of Content Words.Agustin Vicente - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (4):947-968.
    There is an ongoing debate about the meaning of lexical words, i.e., words that contribute with content to the meaning of sentences. This debate has coincided with a renewal in the study of polysemy, which has taken place in the psycholinguistics camp mainly. There is already a fruitful interbreeding between two lines of research: the theoretical study of lexical word meaning, on the one hand, and the models of polysemy psycholinguists present, on the other. In this paper I aim (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  59
    Cross-Situational Learning: An Experimental Study of Word-Learning Mechanisms.Kenny Smith, Andrew D. M. Smith & Richard A. Blythe - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):480-498.
    Cross-situational learning is a mechanism for learning the meaning of words across multiple exposures, despite exposure-by-exposure uncertainty as to the word's true meaning. We present experimental evidence showing that humans learn words effectively using cross-situational learning, even at high levels of referential uncertainty. Both overall success rates and the time taken to learn words are affected by the degree of referential uncertainty, with greater referential uncertainty leading to less reliable, slower learning. Words are also learned less successfully and more (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  3.  73
    Japanese Sound-Symbolism Facilitates Word Learning in English-Speaking Children.Katerina Kantartzis, Mutsumi Imai & Sotaro Kita - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):575-586.
    Sound-symbolism is the nonarbitrary link between the sound and meaning of a word. Japanese-speaking children performed better in a verb generalization task when they were taught novel sound-symbolic verbs, created based on existing Japanese sound-symbolic words, than novel nonsound-symbolic verbs (Imai, Kita, Nagumo, & Okada, 2008). A question remained as to whether the Japanese children had picked up regularities in the Japanese sound-symbolic lexicon or were sensitive to universal sound-symbolism. The present study aimed to provide support for the latter. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  4.  36
    Retrieval Dynamics and Retention in Cross‐Situational Statistical Word Learning.Haley A. Vlach & Catherine M. Sandhofer - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):757-774.
    Previous research on cross-situational word learning has demonstrated that learners are able to reduce ambiguity in mapping words to referents by tracking co-occurrence probabilities across learning events. In the current experiments, we examined whether learners are able to retain mappings over time. The results revealed that learners are able to retain mappings for up to 1 week later. However, there were interactions between the amount of retention and the different learning conditions. Interestingly, the strongest retention was associated with a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  5.  47
    Competitive Processes in Cross‐Situational Word Learning.Daniel Yurovsky, Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (5):891-921.
    Cross-situational word learning, like any statistical learning problem, involves tracking the regularities in the environment. However, the information that learners pick up from these regularities is dependent on their learning mechanism. This article investigates the role of one type of mechanism in statistical word learning: competition. Competitive mechanisms would allow learners to find the signal in noisy input and would help to explain the speed with which learners succeed in statistical learning tasks. Because cross-situational word learning provides (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  6.  44
    A Probabilistic Computational Model of Cross-Situational Word Learning.Afsaneh Fazly, Afra Alishahi & Suzanne Stevenson - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (6):1017-1063.
    Words are the essence of communication: They are the building blocks of any language. Learning the meaning of words is thus one of the most important aspects of language acquisition: Children must first learn words before they can combine them into complex utterances. Many theories have been developed to explain the impressive efficiency of young children in acquiring the vocabulary of their language, as well as the developmental patterns observed in the course of lexical acquisition. A major source of disagreement (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  7.  19
    Word Meanings Evolve to Selectively Preserve Distinctions on Salient Dimensions.Catriona Silvey, Simon Kirby & Kenny Smith - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (1):212-226.
    Words refer to objects in the world, but this correspondence is not one-to-one: Each word has a range of referents that share features on some dimensions but differ on others. This property of language is called underspecification. Parts of the lexicon have characteristic patterns of underspecification; for example, artifact nouns tend to specify shape, but not color, whereas substance nouns specify material but not shape. These regularities in the lexicon enable learners to generalize new words appropriately. How does the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8.  80
    Looking in the Wrong Direction Correlates With More Accurate Word Learning.Stanka A. Fitneva & Morten H. Christiansen - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):367-380.
    Previous research on lexical development has aimed to identify the factors that enable accurate initial word-referent mappings based on the assumption that the accuracy of initial word-referent associations is critical for word learning. The present study challenges this assumption. Adult English speakers learned an artificial language within a cross-situational learning paradigm. Visual fixation data were used to assess the direction of visual attention. Participants whose longest fixations in the initial trials fell more often on distracter images performed (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  9.  22
    Multimodal Word Meaning Induction From Minimal Exposure to Natural Text.Angeliki Lazaridou, Marco Marelli & Marco Baroni - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S4):677-705.
    By the time they reach early adulthood, English speakers are familiar with the meaning of thousands of words. In the last decades, computational simulations known as distributional semantic models have demonstrated that it is possible to induce word meaning representations solely from word co-occurrence statistics extracted from a large amount of text. However, while these models learn in batch mode from large corpora, human word learning proceeds incrementally after minimal exposure to new words. In this study, we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  20
    The Pursuit of Word Meanings.Stevens Jon Scott, R. Gleitman Lila, C. Trueswell John & Yang Charles - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S4):638-676.
    We evaluate here the performance of four models of cross-situational word learning: two global models, which extract and retain multiple referential alternatives from each word occurrence; and two local models, which extract just a single referent from each occurrence. One of these local models, dubbed Pursuit, uses an associative learning mechanism to estimate word-referent probability but pursues and tests the best referent-meaning at any given time. Pursuit is found to perform as well as global models under many (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  46
    Serving Two Masters: Ethics, Epistemology, and Taking People at Their Word.Jorah Dannenberg - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (1):119-136.
    Word-taking has both an epistemic and an ethical dimension. I argue that we have no good way of understanding how both ethical and epistemic considerations can be brought to bear when someone makes up her mind to take another at her word, even as we recognize that they must. This difficulty runs deep, and takes the familiar form of a sceptical problem. It originates in an otherwise powerful and compelling way of thinking about what distinguishes theoretical from practical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  33
    Classical Sāṁkhya on the Relationship Between a Word and Its Meaning.Ołena Łucyszyna - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (2):303-323.
    The aim of this article is to reconstruct the classical Sāṁkhya view on the relationship between a word and its meaning. The study embraces all the extant texts of classical Sāṁkhya, but it is based mainly on the Yuktidīpikā, since this commentary contains most of the fragments which are directly related to the topic of our research. The textual analysis has led me to the following conclusion. It is possible to reconstruct two different and conflicting views on the relationship (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  17
    Cross‐Situational Learning of Minimal Word Pairs.Paola Escudero, Karen E. Mulak & Haley A. Vlach - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):455-465.
    Cross-situational statistical learning of words involves tracking co-occurrences of auditory words and objects across time to infer word-referent mappings. Previous research has demonstrated that learners can infer referents across sets of very phonologically distinct words, but it remains unknown whether learners can encode fine phonological differences during cross-situational statistical learning. This study examined learners’ cross-situational statistical learning of minimal pairs that differed on one consonant segment, minimal pairs that differed on one vowel segment, and non-minimal pairs that differed on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Protein Analysis Meets Visual Word Recognition: A Case for String Kernels in the Brain.Thomas Hannagan & Jonathan Grainger - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (4):575-606.
    It has been recently argued that some machine learning techniques known as Kernel methods could be relevant for capturing cognitive and neural mechanisms (Jäkel, Schölkopf, & Wichmann, 2009). We point out that ‘‘String kernels,’’ initially designed for protein function prediction and spam detection, are virtually identical to one contending proposal for how the brain encodes orthographic information during reading. We suggest some reasons for this connection and we derive new ideas for visual word recognition that are successfully put to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  12
    Not Only Size Matters: Early‐Talker and Late‐Talker Vocabularies Support Different Word‐Learning Biases in Babies and Networks.Eliana Colunga & Clare E. Sims - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):73-95.
    In typical development, word learning goes from slow and laborious to fast and seemingly effortless. Typically developing 2-year-olds seem to intuit the whole range of things in a category from hearing a single instance named—they have word-learning biases. This is not the case for children with relatively small vocabularies. We present a computational model that accounts for the emergence of word-learning biases in children at both ends of the vocabulary spectrum based solely on vocabulary structure. The results (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  41
    Detailed Behavioral Analysis as a Window Into Cross-Situational Word Learning.Sumarga H. Suanda & Laura L. Namy - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):545-559.
    Recent research has demonstrated that word learners can determine word-referent mappings by tracking co-occurrences across multiple ambiguous naming events. The current study addresses the mechanisms underlying this capacity to learn words cross-situationally. This replication and extension of Yu and Smith (2007) investigates the factors influencing both successful cross-situational word learning and mis-mappings. Item analysis and error patterns revealed that the co-occurrence structure of the learning environment as well as the context of the testing environment jointly affected learning (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  17.  19
    Moving Word Learning to a Novel Space: A Dynamic Systems View of Referent Selection and Retention.K. Samuelson Larissa, C. Kucker Sarah & P. Spencer John - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):52-72.
    Theories of cognitive development must address both the issue of how children bring their knowledge to bear on behavior in-the-moment, and how knowledge changes over time. We argue that seeking answers to these questions requires an appreciation of the dynamic nature of the developing system in its full, reciprocal complexity. We illustrate this dynamic complexity with results from two lines of research on early word learning. The first demonstrates how the child's active engagement with objects and people supports referent (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  18
    Feature Biases in Early Word Learning: Network Distinctiveness Predicts Age of Acquisition.Tomas Engelthaler & Thomas T. Hills - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    Do properties of a word's features influence the order of its acquisition in early word learning? Combining the principles of mutual exclusivity and shape bias, the present work takes a network analysis approach to understanding how feature distinctiveness predicts the order of early word learning. Distance networks were built from nouns with edge lengths computed using various distance measures. Feature distinctiveness was computed as a distance measure, showing how far an object in a network is from other (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  22
    Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect.Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (8):1604-1633.
    Children and adults may not realize how much they depend on external sources in understanding word meanings. Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a “Misplaced Meaning” effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that children and adults show a highly consistent MM effect, and that it is stronger in young children. Study (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20.  30
    The Perceptions of Consumers Regarding Online Retailers' Ethics and Their Relationship with Consumers' General Internet Expertise and Word of Mouth: A Preliminary Analysis. [REVIEW]Sergio Román & Pedro J. Cuestas - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):641 - 656.
    Ethical concerns of Internet users continue to rise. Accordingly, several scholars have called for systematic empirical research to address these issues. This study examines the conceptualization and measurement of consumers' perceptions regarding the ethics of online retailers (CPEOR). Also, this research represents a first step into the analysis of the relationship between CPEOR, consumers' general Internet expertise and reported positive word of mouth (WOM). Results, from a convenience sample of 357 online shoppers, suggest that CPEOR can be operationalized as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21.  54
    Using Variability to Guide Dimensional Weighting: Associative Mechanisms in Early Word Learning.Keith S. Apfelbaum & Bob McMurray - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1105-1138.
    At 14 months, children appear to struggle to apply their fairly well-developed speech perception abilities to learning similar sounding words (e.g., bih/dih; Stager & Werker, 1997). However, variability in nonphonetic aspects of the training stimuli seems to aid word learning at this age. Extant theories of early word learning cannot account for this benefit of variability. We offer a simple explanation for this range of effects based on associative learning. Simulations suggest that if infants encode both noncontrastive information (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22.  32
    Learning During Processing: Word Learning Doesn't Wait for Word Recognition to Finish.S. Apfelbaum Keith & McMurray Bob - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S4):706-747.
    Previous research on associative learning has uncovered detailed aspects of the process, including what types of things are learned, how they are learned, and where in the brain such learning occurs. However, perceptual processes, such as stimulus recognition and identification, take time to unfold. Previous studies of learning have not addressed when, during the course of these dynamic recognition processes, learned representations are formed and updated. If learned representations are formed and updated while recognition is ongoing, the result of learning (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  13
    The Utility of Cognitive Plausibility in Language Acquisition Modeling: Evidence From Word Segmentation.Lawrence Phillips & Lisa Pearl - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1824-1854.
    The informativity of a computational model of language acquisition is directly related to how closely it approximates the actual acquisition task, sometimes referred to as the model's cognitive plausibility. We suggest that though every computational model necessarily idealizes the modeled task, an informative language acquisition model can aim to be cognitively plausible in multiple ways. We discuss these cognitive plausibility checkpoints generally and then apply them to a case study in word segmentation, investigating a promising Bayesian segmentation strategy. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  18
    When Cars Hit Trucks and Girls Hug Boys: The Effect of Animacy on Word Order in Gestural Language Creation.Annemarie Kocab, Hannah Lam & Jesse Snedeker - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (3):918-938.
    A well-known typological observation is the dominance of subject-initial word orders, SOV and SVO, across the world's languages. Recent findings from gestural language creation paradigms offer possible explanations for the prevalence of SOV. When asked to gesture transitive events with an animate agent and inanimate patient, gesturers tend to produce SOV order, regardless of their native language biases. Interestingly, when the patient is animate, gesturers shift away from SOV to use of other orders, like SVO and OSV. Two competing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  58
    The Modulation of Visual and Task Characteristics of a Writing System on Hemispheric Lateralization in Visual Word Recognition—A Computational Exploration.Janet H. Hsiao & Sze Man Lam - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (5):861-890.
    Through computational modeling, here we examine whether visual and task characteristics of writing systems alone can account for lateralization differences in visual word recognition between different languages without assuming influence from left hemisphere (LH) lateralized language processes. We apply a hemispheric processing model of face recognition to visual word recognition; the model implements a theory of hemispheric asymmetry in perception that posits low spatial frequency biases in the right hemisphere and high spatial frequency (HSF) biases in the LH. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  13
    A Bootstrapping Model of Frequency and Context Effects in Word Learning.Kachergis George, Yu Chen & M. Shiffrin Richard - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (3):590-622.
    Prior research has shown that people can learn many nouns from a short series of ambiguous situations containing multiple words and objects. For successful cross-situational learning, people must approximately track which words and referents co-occur most frequently. This study investigates the effects of allowing some word-referent pairs to appear more frequently than others, as is true in real-world learning environments. Surprisingly, high-frequency pairs are not always learned better, but can also boost learning of other pairs. Using a recent associative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  8
    Canalization of Language Structure From Environmental Constraints: A Computational Model of Word Learning From Multiple Cues.Padraic Monaghan - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (1):21-34.
    There is substantial variation in language experience, yet there is surprising similarity in the language structure acquired. Constraints on language structure may be external modulators that result in this canalization of language structure, or else they may derive from the broader, communicative environment in which language is acquired. In this paper, the latter perspective is tested for its adequacy in explaining robustness of language learning to environmental variation. A computational model of word learning from cross-situational, multimodal information was constructed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  12
    Graph‐Theoretic Properties of Networks Based on Word Association Norms: Implications for Models of Lexical Semantic Memory.Thomas M. Gruenenfelder, Gabriel Recchia, Tim Rubin & Michael N. Jones - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1460-1495.
    We compared the ability of three different contextual models of lexical semantic memory and of a simple associative model to predict the properties of semantic networks derived from word association norms. None of the semantic models were able to accurately predict all of the network properties. All three contextual models over-predicted clustering in the norms, whereas the associative model under-predicted clustering. Only a hybrid model that assumed that some of the responses were based on a contextual model and others (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  5
    Canalization of Language Structure From Environmental Constraints: A Computational Model of Word Learning From Multiple Cues.Padraic Monaghan - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4).
    There is substantial variation in language experience, yet there is surprising similarity in the language structure acquired. Constraints on language structure may be external modulators that result in this canalization of language structure, or else they may derive from the broader, communicative environment in which language is acquired. In this paper, the latter perspective is tested for its adequacy in explaining robustness of language learning to environmental variation. A computational model of word learning from cross-situational, multimodal information was constructed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  58
    Locke and the Primary Signification of Words: An Approach to Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):486-506.
    Locke’s claim that the primary signification of (most) words is an idea, or complex of ideas, has received different interpretations. I support the majority view that Locke’s notion of primary signification can be construed in terms of linguistic meaning. But this reading has been seen as making Locke’s account vulnerable to various criticisms, of which I consider two. First, it appears to make the account vulnerable to the charge that an idea cannot play the role that a word meaning (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  23
    Interactive Skills and Individual Differences in a Word Production Task.Frédéric Vallée-Tourangeau & Miles Wrightman - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (4):433-439.
    In attempting to solve a wide variety of tasks, people naturally seek to modify their external environment such that the physical space in which they work is more amenable or ‘congenial’ to achieving a desired outcome. Attempts to determine the effectiveness of certain artifacts or spatial reorganizations in aiding reasoners solve problems must be relativised to the difficulty of the task and the cognitive abilities of the reasoners. These factors were examined using a simple word production task with letter (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  15
    The Interplay of Cross‐Situational Word Learning and Sentence‐Level Constraints.Judith Koehne & Matthew W. Crocker - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (5):849-889.
    A variety of mechanisms contribute to word learning. Learners can track co-occurring words and referents across situations in a bottom-up manner. Equally, they can exploit sentential contexts, relying on top–down information such as verb–argument relations and world knowledge, offering immediate constraints on meaning. When combined, CSWL and SLCL potentially modulate each other's influence, revealing how word learners deal with multiple mechanisms simultaneously: Do they use all mechanisms? Prefer one? Is their strategy context dependent? Three experiments conducted with adult (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Exclusion Constraints Facilitate Statistical Word Learning.Katherine Yoshida, Mijke Rhemtulla & Athena Vouloumanos - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):933-947.
    The roles of linguistic, cognitive, and social-pragmatic processes in word learning are well established. If statistical mechanisms also contribute to word learning, they must interact with these processes; however, there exists little evidence for such mechanistic synergy. Adults use co-occurrence statistics to encode speech–object pairings with detailed sensitivity in stochastic learning environments (Vouloumanos, 2008). Here, we replicate this statistical work with nonspeech sounds and compare the results with the previous speech studies to examine whether exclusion constraints contribute equally (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  31
    The Effect of Sonority on Word Segmentation: Evidence for the Use of a Phonological Universal.Marc Ettlinger, Amy S. Finn & Carla L. Hudson Kam - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (4):655-673.
    It has been well documented how language-specific cues may be used for word segmentation. Here, we investigate what role a language-independent phonological universal, the sonority sequencing principle (SSP), may also play. Participants were presented with an unsegmented speech stream with non-English word onsets that juxtaposed adherence to the SSP with transitional probabilities. Participants favored using the SSP in assessing word-hood, suggesting that the SSP represents a potentially powerful cue for word segmentation. To ensure the SSP influenced (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  50
    Semantic Priming: On the Role of Awareness in Visual Word Recognition in the Absence of an Expectancy.Matthew Brown & Derek Besner - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):402-422.
    By hypothesis, awareness is involved in the modulation of feedback from semantics to the lexical level in the visual word recognition system. When subjects are aware of the fact that there are many related prime–target pairs in a semantic priming experiment, this knowledge is used to configure the system to feed activation back from semantics to the lexical level so as to facilitate processing. When subjects are unaware of this fact, the default set is maintained in which activation is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  29
    Partial Word Order Freezing in Dutch.Gerlof J. Bouma & Petra Hendriks - 2012 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 21 (1):53-73.
    Dutch allows for variation as to whether the first position in the sentence is occupied by the subject or by some other constituent, such as the direct object. In particular situations, however, this commonly observed variation in word order is ‘frozen’ and only the subject appears in first position. We hypothesize that this partial freezing of word order in Dutch can be explained from the dependence of the speaker’s choice of word order on the hearer’s interpretation of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  7
    Polynomial Time Uniform Word Problems.Stanley Burris - 1995 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 41 (2):173-182.
    We have two polynomial time results for the uniform word problem for a quasivariety Q: The uniform word problem for Q can be solved in polynomial time iff one can find a certain congruence on finite partial algebras in polynomial time. Let Q* be the relational class determined by Q. If any universal Horn class between the universal closure S and the weak embedding closure S̄ of Q* is finitely axiomatizable then the uniform word problem for Q (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  23
    Word Order and Scrambling.Simin Karimi (ed.) - 2003 - Blackwell.
    Word Order and Scrambling introduces readers to recent research into the linguistic phenomenon called scrambling and is a valuable contribution to the fields of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  21
    Bayesian Word Learning in Multiple Language Environments.Benjamin D. Zinszer, Sebi V. Rolotti, Fan Li & Ping Li - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):439-462.
    Infant language learners are faced with the difficult inductive problem of determining how new words map to novel or known objects in their environment. Bayesian inference models have been successful at using the sparse information available in natural child-directed speech to build candidate lexicons and infer speakers’ referential intentions. We begin by asking how a Bayesian model optimized for monolingual input generalizes to new monolingual or bilingual corpora and find that, especially in the case of the bilingual input, the model (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  14
    Context Effects and Spoken Word Recognition of Chinese: An Eye‐Tracking Study.Michael C. W. Yip & Mingjun Zhai - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S4):1134-1153.
    This study examined the time-course of context effects on spoken word recognition during Chinese sentence processing. We recruited 60 native Mandarin listeners to participate in an eye-tracking experiment. In this eye-tracking experiment, listeners were told to listen to a sentence carefully, which ended with a Chinese homophone, and look at different visual probes presented concurrently on the computer screen naturally. Different types of context and probe types were manipulated in the experiment. The results showed that preceding sentence context had (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  21
    A centralidade da Palavra de Deus em Lucas 5,1-11 (The centrality of the Word od God in Luke 5,1-11) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p682. [REVIEW]Ildo Perondi, Fabrizio Zandonadi Catenassi & Gisele Soares Silva - 2013 - Horizonte 11 (30):682-708.
    Pouca atenção foi dada pelos estudiosos para a função da Palavra de Deus no relato da pesca milagrosa em Lucas, tanto em nível literário, quanto teológico. Diante disso, o objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a perícope de Lc 5,1-11, com enfoque na Palavra de Deus, proclamada em Jesus e por ele. A metodologia utilizada foi a análise e interpretação de textos, privilegiando o método histórico-crítico e os seus elementos essenciais, além do uso de outros métodos, baseados na ciência da linguagem. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  12
    All the Right Noises: Background Variability Helps Early Word Learning.Katherine E. Twomey, Lizhi Ma & Gert Westermann - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):413-438.
    Variability is prevalent in early language acquisition, but, whether it supports or hinders learning is unclear; while target variability has been shown to facilitate word learning, variability in competitor items has been shown to make the task harder. Here, we tested whether background variability could boost learning in a referent selection task. Two groups of 2-year-old children saw arrays of one novel and two known objects on a screen, and they heard a novel or known label. Stimuli were identical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  9
    Linguistic Constraints on Statistical Word Segmentation: The Role of Consonants in Arabic and English.Itamar Kastner & Frans Adriaans - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):494-518.
    Statistical learning is often taken to lie at the heart of many cognitive tasks, including the acquisition of language. One particular task in which probabilistic models have achieved considerable success is the segmentation of speech into words. However, these models have mostly been tested against English data, and as a result little is known about how a statistical learning mechanism copes with input regularities that arise from the structural properties of different languages. This study focuses on statistical word segmentation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  7
    God’s Word Among Hermeneutics, Exegesis and Homiletics.Ramona Hosu - 2017 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 16 (48):141-146.
    Review of Pr. Ioan Chirilă, Scara cuvântului. Eseuri omiletice [ The Ladder of the Word. Homiletic Essays ],.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  14
    Seperating the Intrinsic Complexity and the Derivational Complexity of the Word Problem for Finitely Presented Groups.Daniel E. Cohen, Klaus Madlener & Friedrich Otto - 1993 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 39 (1):143-157.
    A pseudo-natural algorithm for the word problem of a finitely presented group is an algorithm which not only tells us whether or not a word w equals 1 in the group but also gives a derivation of 1 from w when w equals 1. In [13], [14] Madlener and Otto show that, if we measure complexity of a primitive recursive algorithm by its level in the Grzegorczyk hierarchy, there are groups in which a pseudo-natural algorithm is arbitrarily more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  5
    Parallels Between Action‐Object Mapping and Word‐Object Mapping in Young Children.Kevin J. Riggs, Emily Mather, Grace Hyde & Andrew Simpson - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (4):992-1006.
    Across a series of four experiments with 3- to 4-year-olds we demonstrate how cognitive mechanisms supporting noun learning extend to the mapping of actions to objects. In Experiment 1 the demonstration of a novel action led children to select a novel, rather than a familiar object. In Experiment 2 children exhibited long-term retention of novel action-object mappings and extended these actions to other category members. In Experiment 3 we showed that children formed an accurate sensorimotor record of the novel action. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  7
    Does Priming with Awareness Reflect Explicit Contamination? An Approach with a Response-Time Measure in Word-Stem Completion.Séverine Fay, Michel Isingrini & Viviane Pouthas - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):459-473.
    The present experiment investigates the involvement of awareness in functional dissociations between explicit and implicit tests. In the explicit condition, participants attempted to recall lexically or semantically studied words using word stems. In the implicit condition, they were instructed to complete each stem with the first word which came to mind. Subjective awareness was subsequently measured on an item-by-item basis. As voluntary retrieval strategies are known to be time consuming, the time taken to complete each stem was recorded. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  43
    Studies of Scrambling: Movement and Non-Movement Approaches to Free Word-Order Phenomena.Norbert Corver & Henk C. van Riemsdijk (eds.) - 1994 - Mouton De Gruyter.
    ... the phenomenon of variable word order within a clause. Ross (), who was one of the first to discuss this phenomenon within the generative paradigm, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  32
    Word-Order Change as a Source of Grammaticalisation.Susann Fischer - 2010 - John Benjamins Pub. Company.
    1. Introduction -- 2. Different views on grammaticalisation and its relation to word-order -- 3. Historical overview of oblique subjects in Germanic and Romance -- 4. Historical overview of stylistic fronting in Germanic and Romance -- 5. Accounting for the differences and similarities between the languages under investigation -- 6. Explaining the changes: minimalism meets von Humboldt and Meillet -- References.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  34
    Word-Order Based Grammar.Eva Koktova - 1999 - Mouton De Gruyter.
    In this book, a new theory of grammar based on word order is proposed: a deep word order as the multipartioned communicative-information structure of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000