18 found
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  1. Religion, the Nature of Ultimate Owner, and Corporate Philanthropic Giving: Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Yingjie Du, Wentao Feng & Quan Zeng - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-22.
    Using a sample of Chinese listed firms for the period of 2004–2010, this study examines the impact of religion on corporate philanthropic giving. Based on hand-collected data of religion and corporate philanthropic giving, we provide strong and robust evidence that religion is significantly positively associated with Chinese listed firms’ philanthropic giving. This finding is consistent with the view that religiosity has remarkable effects on individual thinking and behavior, and can serve as social norms to influence corporate philanthropy. Moreover, religion and (...)
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  2. Corporate Environmental Responsibility in Polluting Industries: Does Religion Matter?Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Quan Zeng & Yingjie Du - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):1-23.
    Using a sample of Chinese listed firms in polluting industries for the period of 2008–2010, we empirically investigate whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, affects corporate environmental responsibility (CER). In this study, we measure Buddhist variables as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses. In addition, we hand-collect corporate environmental disclosure scores based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting guidelines. Using hand-collected Buddhism data and corporate environmental disclosure scores, (...)
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  3.  16
    Does Religion Matter to Owner-Manager Agency Costs? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):319-347.
    In China, Buddhism and Taoism are two major religions. Using a sample of 10,363 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2010, I provide strong and robust evidence that religion (i.e., Buddhism and Taoism on the whole) is significantly negatively associated with owner-manager agency costs. In particular, using firm-level religion data measured by the number of religious sites within a radius of certain distance around a listed firm’s registered address, I find that religion is significantly negatively (...)
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  4.  30
    Does Religion Mitigate Earnings Management? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Shaojuan Lai, Yingjie Du & Hongmei Pei - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (3):699-749.
    Using a sample of 11,357 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2011, we investigate whether and how religion can mitigate earnings management. Specifically, based on geographic-proximity-based religion variables, we provide strong and robust evidence to show that religion is significantly negatively associated with the extent of earnings management, suggesting that religion can serve as a set of social norms to mitigate corporate unethical behavior such as earnings management. Our findings also reveal that the negative association (...)
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  5.  14
    Is Corporate Philanthropy Used as Environmental Misconduct Dressing? Evidence From Chinese Family-Owned Firms.Xingqiang Du - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):341-361.
    In this study, I examine the hidden connection between corporate philanthropic giving and corporate environmental misconduct. Using survey data from Chinese family-owned firms, I provide strong and consistent evidence to show that corporate environmental misconduct is significantly positively associated with corporate philanthropic giving, suggesting that some Chinese family-owned firms act philanthropically to divert public attention from their environmentally unfriendly behavior. Moreover, the positive association between corporate environmental misconduct and corporate philanthropic giving is less pronounced for politically connected family-owned firms than (...)
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  6.  37
    Does Religion Mitigate Tunneling? Evidence From Chinese Buddhism.Xingqiang Du - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-29.
    In the Chinese stock market, controlling shareholders often use inter-corporate loans to expropriate a great amount of cash from listed firms, through a process called “tunneling.” Using a sample of 10,170 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2010, I examine whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, can mitigate tunneling. In particular, using firm-level Buddhism data, measured as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses, this study (...)
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  7.  34
    How the Market Values Greenwashing? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):547-574.
    In China, many firms advertise that they follow environmentally friendly practices to cover their true activities, a practice called greenwashing, which can cause the public to doubt the sincerity of greenization messages. In this study, I investigate how the market values greenwashing and further examine whether corporate environmental performance can explain different and asymmetric market reactions to environmentally friendly and unfriendly firms. Using a sample from the Chinese stock market, I provide strong evidence to show that greenwashing is significantly negatively (...)
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  8.  15
    Does Confucianism Reduce Minority Shareholder Expropriation? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (4):661-716.
    Using a sample of 12,061 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2011 and geographic-proximity-based Confucianism variables, this study provides strong evidence that Confucianism is significantly negatively associated with minority shareholder expropriation, implying that Confucianism does mitigate agency conflicts between the controlling shareholder and minority shareholders. This finding suggests that Confucianism has important influence on business ethics, and thus can serve as an important ethical philosophy or social norm to mitigate the controlling shareholder’s unethical expropriation behavior. (...)
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  9.  11
    Does CEO-Auditor Dialect Sharing Impair Pre-IPO Audit Quality? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (3):699-735.
    Using a sample of Chinese to-be-listed firms during the period of 2006–2012, this study examines the influence of CEO-auditor dialect sharing on pre-IPO audit quality and further investigates the moderating effects of auditor reputation and audit firm industry specialization. On the basis of information in personal identification cards, this study hand-collects data about CADS, and then provides strong and consistent evidence to show that CADS is significantly positively related with discretionary accruals, suggesting that CADS leads to the collusion between the (...)
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  10.  26
    Do Lenders Applaud Corporate Environmental Performance? Evidence From Chinese Private-Owned Firms.Xingqiang Du, Jianying Weng, Quan Zeng, Yingying Chang & Hongmei Pei - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):179-207.
    This study extends previous literature on the association between corporate social responsibility and corporate financial behavior by investigating the influence of corporate environmental performance on the cost of debt. Using a sample of Chinese private-owned firms, we document strong and consistent evidence to show that corporate environmental performance is significantly negatively associated with the interest rate on debt—the proxy for the cost of debt. The findings suggest that lenders applaud better environmental performance. Moreover, internal control attenuates the negative association between (...)
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  11.  21
    Culture, Marketization, and Owner-Manager Agency Costs: A Case of Merchant Guild Culture in China.Xingqiang Du, Jianying Weng, Quan Zeng & Hongmei Pei - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (2):353-386.
    This study explores cultural influence on corporate behavior employing the case of merchant guild culture in China and further the moderating role of Marketization. Using hand-collected data on merchant guild culture, we find that merchant guild culture is significantly negatively associated with owner-manager agency costs, suggesting that merchant guild culture in ancient China still has its continuous and remarkable effects on managerial behavior in contemporary corporations. This finding also implies that merchant guild culture motivates managers to upgrade the efficiency of (...)
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  12.  35
    Buy, Lie, or Die: An Investigation of Chinese ST Firms' Voluntary Interim Audit Motive and Auditor Independence. [REVIEW]Alex G. H. Chu, Xingqiang Du & Guohua Jiang - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):135-153.
    In the Chinese stock market, special treatment (ST) firms are the firms listed as facing imminent danger of delisting, unless they return to profitability after reporting two consecutive annual losses. Some ST firms voluntarily pay substantial fees to their external auditors to conduct interim audits, which are not required by regulations. In this study, we investigate and find that ST firms that pay for voluntary interim audits report greater discretionary accrued earnings, higher non-operating earnings, and higher returns on assets in (...)
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  13.  6
    Underwriter–Auditor Relationship and Pre-IPO Earnings Management: Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du, Xu Li, Xuejiao Liu & Shaojuan Lai - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (2):365-392.
    This study examines the influence of underwriter–auditor relationship on pre-initial public offering earnings management. Using a sample of Chinese to-be-listed firms, we find that a close UAR, as reflected in repeated collaborations between an underwriter and an audit firm in IPOs, is positively associated with pre-IPO earnings management. This association is more pronounced for firms with politically connected auditors/underwriters, firms with less reputable auditors/underwriters, firms located in provinces with weak legal environment, firms to-be-listed on boards with lax listing requirements, and (...)
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  14.  23
    Does Confucianism Reduce Board Gender Diversity? Firm-Level Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):399-436.
    This study extends previous literature on the association between Confucianism and corporate decisions by examining Confucianism’s influence on board gender diversity. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms during the period of 2001–2011 and geographic-proximity-based Confucianism variables, I provide strong and consistent evidence to show that Confucianism is significantly negatively associated with board gender diversity, suggesting that the proportion of women directors in the boardroom is significantly lower for firms surrounded by strong Confucianism atmosphere than for firms located in regions (...)
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  15.  14
    Financial Distress, Investment Opportunity, and the Contagion Effect of Low Audit Quality: Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du & Shaojuan Lai - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (3):565-593.
    Using the presence of at least one client with net-income-increasing misstatement as a signal of low audit quality for an audit firm, this study examines the existence of the contagion effect of low audit quality and further investigates whether financial distress and investment opportunity as two firm-specific financial characteristics moderate the contagion effect of low audit quality. Using a sample of 7887 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market over the period of 2007–2012, our study documents strong and consistent evidence (...)
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  16.  13
    What’s in a Surname? The Effect of Auditor-CEO Surname Sharing on Financial Misstatement.Xingqiang Du - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):849-874.
    This study examines the influence of auditor-CEO surname sharing on financial misstatement and further investigates whether the above effect depends on hometown relationship and the rarity of surnames, respectively. Using hand-collected data from China, the findings show that ACSS is significantly positively related to financial misstatement, suggesting that the auditor-CEO ancestry membership elicits the collusion and increases the likelihood of financial misstatement. Moreover, ACSS based upon hometown relationship leads to significantly higher likelihood of financial misstatement, compared with ACSS without hometown (...)
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  17.  25
    Religious Belief, Corporate Philanthropy, and Political Involvement of Entrepreneurs in Chinese Family Firms.Xingqiang Du - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (2):385-406.
    This study examines whether religious belief influences an entrepreneur’s political involvement and further explores the moderating role of corporate philanthropy. Using the data from the 2008 national survey of Chinese family firms, my study provides strong evidence to show that the likelihood of political involvement is significantly higher for entrepreneurs with religious beliefs than for their counterparts, suggesting that religious entrepreneurs in Chinese family firms are more likely to participate in political affairs. This finding echoes the view that religious believers (...)
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  18.  9
    Do Auditors Applaud Corporate Environmental Performance? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Quan Zeng & Yingying Chang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):1049-1080.
    This study examines the influence of corporate environmental performance on the propensity that auditors issue modified audit opinions and further investigates the moderating effects of internal control and greenwashing. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms, our findings reveal that corporate environmental performance is significantly negatively associated with modified audit opinions, suggesting that auditors applaud environmentally friendly firms. Moreover, internal control reinforces the negative association between corporate environmental performance and modified audit opinions, but greenwashing attenuates the negative effect of corporate (...)
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