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  1.  47
    On (∈, ∈ ∨ Q)‐Fuzzy Filters of R0‐Algebras.Xueling Ma, Jianming Zhan & Young B. Jun - 2009 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 55 (5):493-508.
    In this paper, we introduce the notions of -fuzzy filters and -fuzzy Boolean filters in R0-algebras and investigate some of their related properties. Some characterization theorems of these generalized fuzzy filters are derived. In particular, we prove that a fuzzy set in R0-algebras is an -fuzzy Boolean filter if and only if it is an -fuzzy implicative filter. Finally, we consider the concepts of implication-based fuzzy Boolean filters of R0-algebras.
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  2.  28
    On -Fuzzy Filters ofR0-Algebras.Xueling Ma, Jianming Zhan & Young B. Jun - 2009 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 55 (5):493-508.
    In this paper, we introduce the notions of -fuzzy filters and -fuzzy Boolean filters in R0-algebras and investigate some of their related properties. Some characterization theorems of these generalized fuzzy filters are derived. In particular, we prove that a fuzzy set in R0-algebras is an -fuzzy Boolean filter if and only if it is an -fuzzy implicative filter. Finally, we consider the concepts of implication-based fuzzy Boolean filters of R0-algebras.
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    The Role of Social Power in Neural Responses to Others’ Pain.Xueling Ma, Kai Wu & Entao Zhang - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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    How Social Power Affects the Processing of Angry Expressions: Evidence From Behavioral and Electrophysiological Data.Entao Zhang, Xueling Ma, Ruiwen Tao, Tao Suo, Huang Gu & Yongxin Li - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    With the help of event-related potentials, the present study used an oddball paradigm to investigate how both individual and target power modulate neural responses to angry expressions. Specifically, participants were assigned into a high-power or low-power condition. Then, they were asked to detect a deviant angry expression from a high-power or low-power target among a series of neutral expressions, while behavioral responses and electroencephalogram were recorded. The behavioral results showed that high-power individuals responded faster to detect angry expressions than low-power (...)
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