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  1.  81
    The a Priori Value and Feeling in Max Scheler and Wang Yangming.Yinghua Lu - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (3):197-211.
    Following Mou Zongsan’s interpretation of Wang Yangming, this paper investigates the phenomenology of values and moral emotions in Max Scheler and the Confucian learning of heart, especially Wang Yangming. Part I illustrates the meaning of moral emotions in Confucianism and introduces Wang Yangming’s idea of pure knowing . Part II introduces Max Scheler’s idea of a priori value and feeling in order to explain how pure knowing could be both immanent and transcendental, both subjective and objective. Part III explores the (...)
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  2.  19
    Pure Knowing as Moral Feeling and Moral Cognition: Wang Yangming’s Phenomenology of Approval and Disapproval.Yinghua Lu - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (4):309-323.
    The main goals of this paper are two. First, it articulates what kinds of knowing pure knowing is in its narrow sense pure knowing as the capacity of moral judgment; pure knowing as moral knowledge and standard. Besides, it analyses pure knowing’s different features through a phenomenological description. All these aspects of pure knowing are tied by moral feeling. Second, this paper addresses two sets of theoretical problems that have been raised in Confucian discourse with respect to pure knowing and (...)
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  3.  10
    Shame and the Confucian Idea of Yi.Yinghua Lu - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (1):5-18.
    This paper analyzes the relation between shame and a Confucian notion of yi, especially through discussions from Confucius and Mencius. Section one clarifies Mencius’s position that righteousness is both external and internal. Although this idea includes rules, it is primarily something intended by our innate moral feelings. Section two illustrates the point that if one’s action is not right, the feeling of shame spontaneously arises and motivates a self-correction. This section also clarifies the difference between the idea of shame in (...)
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  4.  10
    Shame and the Confucian Idea of Yi in Advance.Yinghua Lu - forthcoming - International Philosophical Quarterly.
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  5.  4
    Wang Yangming's Theory of the Unity of Knowledge and Action Revisited: An Investigation From the Perspective of Moral Emotion.Yinghua Lu - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (1):197-214.
    This article is an extension of my previous article, which describes pure knowing as the ability and criteria for making moral judgment.1 Due to apparent contradictions among Wang Yangming's statements, there are controversies over the evaluation and interpretation of Wang's idea of the relation between moral knowledge 2 and moral action. Generally, on the one hand, Wang admits that there are people who commit wrong actions even though they recognize that these actions are wrong. He claims not only that sages (...)
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  6.  12
    The Phenomenology of Shame: A Clarification in Light of Max Scheler and Confucianism.Yinghua Lu - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (4):507-525.
    This paper will investigate the phenomenology of shame with referring to Max Scheler’s description of the phenomenon and to the tradition of Confucianism. Section I explores the conflict between spirit, life and pleasure in the experience of shame. Shame implies a hierarchy of value, and it is felt when there is a conflict among different values and when the agent intends to sacrifice a higher value for a lower one. Shame also takes place when one is treated by others as (...)
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  7.  13
    The Phenomenology of Respect: With Special Attention to Kant, Scheler, and Confucianism.Yinghua Lu - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (2):112-126.
    In this paper, I focus on analyzing the manifestation and significance of respect. I first illustrate the two meanings of jing 敬 and their connection in Confucian classical texts, which is helpful to understand the Confucian phenomenology of respect. The two meanings are seriousness as a mind-state and respect as an intentional feeling. After clarifying this point, I undertake a phenomenological analysis of respect, in order to show that respect helps one to achieve moral pursuit. This analysis takes the Kantian (...)
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