Results for 'Yiqun Xi'

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  1.  31
    Analysis of the Status of Informed Consent in Medical Research Involving Human Subjects in Public Hospitals in Shanghai.Wang Jianping, Lan Li, Zhongjin di XueTang, Xieyang Jia, Rong Wu, Yiqun Xi, Tong Wang & Ping Zhou - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (7):415-419.
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  2.  67
    Emotion, Desire, and Numismatic Experience in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming.Brian Bruya - 2001 - Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:45-75.
    In this article, I explore the relationship between desire and emotion in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming with the aim of demonstrating 1) that Zhu Xi, by keying on the detriments of selfishness, represents an improvement over the more sweeping Cartesian suggestion to control desires in general; and 2) that Wang Yangming, in turn, represents an improvement over Zhu Xi by providing a more sophisticated hermeneutic of the cosmology of desire.
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  3.  28
    Fate and the Good Life: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yagyong’s Discourse on Ming.Youngsun Back - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):255-274.
    This essay examines the Ru 儒 notion of ming 命, usually translated into English as “fate,” with an emphasis on the thought of two prominent Ru thinkers, Zhu Xi 朱熹 of Song 宋 China and Jeong Yagyong 丁若鏞 of Joseon 朝鮮 Korea. Although they were faithful followers of the tradition of Kongzi 孔子and Mengzi 孟子, they held very different views on ming. Zhu Xi saw the realm of fate as determined by contingent movements of psychophysical force, whereas Jeong Yagyong believed (...)
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  4.  45
    Does Zhu Xi Distinguish Prudence From Morality?Justin Tiwald - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):359-368.
    In Stephen Angle’s Sagehood, he contends that Neo-Confucian philosophers reject ways of moral thinking that draw hard and fast lines between self-directed or prudential concerns (about what is good for me) and other-directed or moral concerns (about what is right, just, virtuous, etc.), and suggests that they are right to do so. In this paper, I spell out Angle’s arguments and interpretation in greater detail and then consider whether they are faithful to one of the chief figures in Neo-Confucian thought. (...)
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  5.  44
    Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,”.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender. pp. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophy’s encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. In “Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,” Ann A. Pang-White investigates Song Neo-Confucians’ views (in particular, that of Zhu Xi) on women by examining the Classifi ed Conversations of Zhu Xi (Zhuzi Yulei), the Reflections on Things at Hand (Jinsi Lu), Further Reflections on Things at Hand (Xu Jinsi Lu), and other texts. Pang-White also takes a close (...)
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  6.  61
    Zhu Xi’s Choice, Historical Criticism and Influence—An Analysis of Zhu Xi’s Relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism.Weixiang Ding - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):521-548.
    As a great synthesist for the School of Principles of the Northern and Southern Song dynasties, Zhu Xi’s influence over the School of Principles was demonstrated not only through his positive theoretical creation, but also through his choice and critical awareness. Zhu’s relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism is a typical case; and his activities, ranging from his research of Buddhism (the Chan School) in his early days to his farewell to the Chan School as a student of Li Dong from (...)
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  7.  19
    Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender,. pp. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophy’s encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. In “Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,” Ann A. Pang-White investigates Song Neo-Confucians’ views (in particular, that of Zhu Xi) on women by examining the Classified Conversations of Zhu Xi (Zhuzi Yulei),the Reflections on Things at Hand (Jinsi Lu), Further Reflections on Things at Hand (Xu Jinsi Lu), and other texts. Pang-White also takes a close look at (...)
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  8.  22
    Dai Zhen’s Criticism and Misunderstanding of Zhu Xi’s Moral Theory.Zemian Zheng - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):433-449.
    Dai Zhen 戴震 criticizes Song-Ming 宋明 Neo-Confucianism, especially Zhu Xi’s 朱熹 dichotomy between principle and desires and his claim that principle is received from Heaven and completely embodied in the heart/mind, as if Zhu advocates asceticism and ultra-intuitionism. This criticism culminates in the accusation of “using principle as a means of killing or persecuting people.” In this paper, I argue that Dai Zhen misunderstands Zhu Xi’s moral theory and does not do him justice. At some point Dai’s criticism is similar (...)
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  9.  50
    Flowing Within the Text: A Discussion on He Lin’s Explanation of Zhu Xi’s Method of Intuition.Xianglong Zhang - 2005 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):60-65.
    The author examines He Lin's interpretation of Zhu Xi's method of intuition from a phenomenological-hermeneutical perspective and by exposing Zhu's philosophical presuppositions. In contrast with Lu Xiangshan's intuitive method, Zhu Xi's method of reading classics advocates "emptying your heart and flowing with the text" and, in this spirit, explains the celebrated "exhaustive investigation on the principles of things (ge wu qiong li)." "Text," according to Zhu, is therefore not an object in ordinary sense but a "contextual region" or "sensible pattern" (...)
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  10.  45
    The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu Xi’s Discussion of “Dreams”—And on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”.Yu Chang - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
    Dreams were a topic of study even in ancient times, and they are a special spiritual phenomenon. Generations of literati have defined the meaning of dreams in their own way, while Zhu Xi was perhaps the most outstanding one among them. He made profound explanations of dreams from aspects such as the relationship between dreams and the principles li and qi, the relationship between dreams and the state of the heart, and the relationship between dreams and an individual’s moral improvement. (...)
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  11. Comentários literários, estilísticos E sintáticos sobre O epodo XI de horácio.Aline Chagas dos Santos - 2011 - Principia: Revista do Departamento de Letras Clássicas e Orientais do Instituto de Letras 2 (23):29-44.
    Augusto foi um governante admirável que, durante o longo tempo de seu império, fez com que a paz reinasse em Roma e com ela o mundo prosperasse. Pode-se considerar que durante seu império ocorreu o período mais produtivo da literatura latina. Apesar de o imperador ter se esforçado em garantir o triunfo da tradição romana, os modelos preferíveis sempre foram as produções gregas. A influência do helenismo revelava-se nas obras de escritores como, por exemplo, Horácio, considerado o mais autobiográfico de (...)
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  12.  9
    The Confucian Canon’s Pivotal and Problematic Middle Era: Reflecting on the Northern Song Masters and Zhu Xi.Hui Yin & Hoyt Tillman - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (1):95-105.
    Zhu Xi’s 朱熹 interpretations systematized the Five Classics; moreover, he elevated the “Four Books” to such a supra-canonical status that these texts along with his commentaries became the core curriculum for civil service examinations from the early 13th century to the 20th century. Inquiring into what was the essential and unique Song 宋 character of Classical scholarship, we will highlight the canonical Ritual Classics because these texts were crucial for centuries, especially during the Han 漢 through Tang 唐 dynasties. We (...)
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  13.  9
    The Significance of Shendu in the Interpretation of Classical Learning and Zhu Xi’s Misreading.Tao Liang - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):305-321.
    According to recently excavated bamboo and silk material, the idea of du 獨 in the concept shendu 慎獨 does not refer to a spatial notion of dwelling in solitude or a solitary dwelling; rather it is the state before having made contact with external things, or the state “before feelings are aroused” (weifa 未發) of the inner heart/mind. It refers to internal thoughts and volitions, or “casting aside external sensations” (sheti 舍體). Shen 慎 should be glossed in accordance with the (...)
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  14.  34
    Zhu Xi's Critique of Buddhism: Selfishness, Salvation, and Self-Cultivation.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In John Makeham (ed.), The Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi's Philosophical Thought. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 122-155.
    This article (1) offers a relatively comprehensive survey of criticisms of Buddhism made by the influential Chinese philosopher Zhu Xi 朱熹 (1130-1200) with translations of key passages, and (2) proposes that these criticisms are best understood as targeting the implicit presuppositions and practical implications of Buddhist teachings, not so much the explicit doctrines of the Buddhists. The article examines three sets of criticisms. The first has to do with Buddhist soteriology, the fundamental priority of Buddhist salvation, which Zhu takes to (...)
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  15.  16
    The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu Xi’s Discussion of “Dreams”—And on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”.Chang Yu - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
  16. Zhu Xi de Si Wei Shi Jie.Hoyt Cleveland Tillman - 2002
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  17.  7
    An Alternative Way of Confucian Sincerity: Wang Yangming's "Unity of Knowing and Doing" as a Response to Zhu Xi's Puzzle of Self-Deception.Zemian Zheng - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1345-1368.
    In this essay I offer a new interpretation of Wang Yangming's 王陽明 well-known doctrine of zhi xing he yi 知行合一 by contextualizing it in his endeavor to seek an alternative way of Confucian learning other than Zhu Xi's 朱熹. Both Wang and Zhu Xi understand the ideal of a Confucian sage as cheng 誠, but propose different ways to attain it. To some extent, Wang's original concern has long been neglected. The recent scholarship on Wang's unity of knowing and doing (...)
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  18.  17
    Zhu Xi's Reading of the Analects: Canon, Commentary and the Classical Tradition.Daniel Gardner - 2003 - Columbia University Press.
    A pioneering study of Zhu Xi's reading of the Analects, this book demonstrates how commentary is both informed by a text and informs future readings, and highlights the importance of interlinear commentary as a genre in Chinese philosophy.
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  19.  15
    Moral Emotions, Awareness, and Spiritual Freedom in the Thought of Zhu Xi.Kai Marchal - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):199-220.
    It is well known that the Neo-Confucian thinker Zhu Xi particularly emphasizes the role of emotions in human life. This paper shows that the four ‘moral emotions’ are central to Zhu's thinking, insofar as only their genuine actualization enables the individual to achieve spiritual freedom. Moreover, I discuss the crucial notions of ‘awareness’/‘perception’ and ‘knowledge’/‘wisdom’, in order to reveal the complex dynamic that moral emotions are said to create in the moral agent. I also analyse two important passages from the (...)
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  20.  10
    Above the Literal Sense: Hermeneutical Rules in Zhu Xi, Eckhart, and Augustine.Shuhong Zheng - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (2):253-276.
    This article is designed to form a question-focused cross-cultural dialogue, rather than compare Zhu Xi 朱熹 with Meister Eckhart in general terms. It will start with an analysis of the exegetical/hermeneutical rules that Zhu Xi and Eckhart set up for their own scriptural commentaries. The study of Eckhart will then be extended to Augustine, in order to explore how Eckhart resorts to Augustine in his commentary writings. Having explored Eckhart’s affinity with Augustine regarding their consensus about the multiplicity of literal (...)
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  21. Zhu XI's Prayers to the Spirit of Confucius and Claim to the Transmission of the Way.Hoyt Cleveland Tillman - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (4):489-513.
    : What philosophical and historical insights might be gained by juxtaposing and linking two distinct areas of Zhu Xi's comments, those on guishen (conventionally glossed as ghosts or spirits) and those on the transmission and succession of the Way (daotong)? There is considerable evidence that he regarded canonical rites for ancestors and teachers as insufficiently satisfying, and thus he sought enhanced communion with the dead. His statements about spirits and especially his prayers to Confucius' spirit served to enhance his confidence (...)
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  22.  80
    Metaphysics and Morality in Neo-Confucianism and Greece: Zhu XI, Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus.Kenneth Dorter - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):255-276.
    If Z hu Xi had been a western philosopher, we would say he synthesized the philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus: that he took from Plato the theory of forms, from Aristotle the connection between form and empirical investigation, and from Plotinus self-differentiating holism. But because a synthesis abstracts from the incompatible elements of its members, it involves rejection as well as inclusion. Thus, Z hu Xi does not accept the dualism by which Plato opposed to the rational forms an (...)
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  23.  19
    Tian as Cosmos in Z Hu Xi’s Neo-Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (2):169-185.
    Tian 天 is central to the metaphysics, cosmology, and ethics of the 800-year-long Chinese philosophical tradition we call “Neo-Confucianism,” but there is considerable confusion over what tian means—confusion which is exacerbated by its standard translation into English as “Heaven.” This essay analyzes the meaning of tian in the works of the most influential Neo-Confucian, Zhu Xi 朱熹, presents a coherent interpretation that unifies the disparate aspects of the term’s meaning, and argues that “cosmos” does an excellent job of capturing this (...)
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  24. Zhu Xi on Family and Women: Challenges and Potentials.Ann A. Pang‐White - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):436-455.
    This article reappraises Zhu Xi's philosophy of women. First, it examines Zhu's descriptive texts. Second, it analyzes Zhu's didactic texts on li, qi, yin, yang, and gender. It finds that (i) surprisingly Zhu exhibited a level of flexibility toward women on subjects of education, property rights, and household management; (ii) his view on the male/yang and female/yin relationship was inconsistent; and (iii) improvement on Zhu's social-political teaching on women's role could result from a more consistent development of his metaphysics. When (...)
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  25.  70
    Ideal Interpretation: The Theories of Zhu Xi and Ronald Dworkin.A. P. & Yang Xiao - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):88-114.
    Ideal interpretation is understanding a text in the best possible way. It is usually used when the text has a canonical status, such as the Bible or the U.S. Constitution. We argue that Zhu Xi’s view about interpreting the Four Books and Ronald Dworkin’s view about constitutional interpretation are examples of ideal interpretation and that their basic principles are similar. Each holds, roughly, that their target text contains moral truth; that the author’s mind requires the mediation of learning; that the (...)
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  26.  11
    Between Poetry and Philosophy: The Neo-Confucian Hermeneutics of Zhu Xi's Nine Bends Poem.Christina Han - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (1):62-85.
    This paper examines the Neo-Confucian hermeneutic debates surrounding the interpretation of Zhu Xi's poem ‘The Boat Song of Wuyi's Nine Bends’. The question of whether to regard the poem as a poetic description of landscape or as a philosophical lesson in a poetic form led to serious philosophical discussions in China and Korea in the centuries that followed its publication. This paper investigates the philosophical commentaries on the poem produced during the Yuan and Ming dynasties, and the contentious hermeneutic debates (...)
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  27.  76
    Zhu Xi on Family and Women.Ann A. Pang-White - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):436-455.
    This article reappraises Zhu Xi's philosophy of women. First, it examines Zhu's descriptive texts. Second, it analyzes Zhu's didactic texts on li, qi, yin, yang, and gender. It finds that (i) surprisingly Zhu exhibited a level of flexibility toward women on subjects of education, property rights, and household management; (ii) his view on the male/yang and female/yin relationship was inconsistent; and (iii) improvement on Zhu's social-political teaching on women's role could result from a more consistent development of his metaphysics. When (...)
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  28.  19
    Influence of Interaction: A Study of Zhu Xi’s Reading of the Taijitu Shuo and the Tongshu.Lizhu Li - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (4):369-377.
    Zhu Xi, as a great leader of Neo-Confucianism, established the succession of the Way and raised Zhou Dunyi to the position of successor of Mencius. Zhu Xi drew attention to Zhou’s thought and wrote a commentary on his Taijitu Shuo 太極圖說 and Tongshu 通書. During the process of annotating these two works, Zhu discussed the texts with scholars such as Li Tong, Lü Zuqian, Zhang Shi, and Lu Jiuyuan to improve his annotation. The suggestions from other scholars affected Zhu’s explanation (...)
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  29.  7
    Ideal Interpretation: The Theories of Zhu Xi and Ronald Dworkin.A. Martinich & Yang Xiao - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):88-114.
    Ideal interpretation is understanding a text in the best possible way. It is usually used when the text has a canonical status, such as the Bible or the U.S. Constitution. We argue that Zhu Xi’s view about interpreting the Four Books and Ronald Dworkin’s view about constitutional interpretation are examples of ideal interpretation and that their basic principles are similar. Each holds, roughly, that their target text contains moral truth; that the author’s mind requires the mediation of learning; that the (...)
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  30.  37
    The Archery of "Wisdom" in the Stream of Life: "Wisdom" in the "Four Books" with Zhu Xi's Reflections.Kirill O. Thompson - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):330 - 344.
    Confucian wisdom is commonly assumed to consist in the Confucian value perspective as humanism in a naturalistic outlook. In fact, Confucius and Mencius sketched out a far more interesting notion of wisdom (zhi) as rooted in cognizance and flexibility and expressed in sensitive discernment and the ability to read and respond to complex, changing circumstances--to read (and respond to) the writing on the wall. Whereas the notions of tradition and the Way are thought to weigh heavily in the Confucian perspective, (...)
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  31. Zhu Xi’s Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (1133–1180) and the other “gentlemen of Hunan” from about 1167 to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to (...)
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  32.  9
    Are Animals Moral?: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yakyong’s Views on Nonhuman Animals.Youngsun Back - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):97-116.
    ABSTRACTOne significant feature of Jeong Yakyong’s丁若鏞 thought is his deconstruction of Zhu Xi’s 朱熹 moral universe based on li 理 and qi 氣. For Zhu Xi, the world in its entirety was a moral place, but Jeong Yakyong distinguished nonmoral domains from the moral domain. One question that follows in pursuing a comparison of their philosophies on this topic is what each thinker meant by ‘moral’ and, in particular, whether they meant the same thing. In this paper, I delve deeper (...)
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  33.  85
    Two Dilemmas in Virtue Ethics and How Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucianism Avoids Them.Yong Huang - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:247-281.
    Virtue ethics has become an important rival to deontology and consequentialism, the two dominant moral theories in modern Western philosophy. What unites various forms of virtue ethics and distinguishes virtue ethics from its rivals is its emphasis on the primacy of virtue. In this article, I start with an explanation of the primacy of virtue in virtue ethics and two dilemmas, detected by Gary Watson, that virtue ethics faces: (1) virtue ethics may maintain the primacy of virtue and thus leave (...)
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  34.  25
    The Ethics of Using Chapter XI as a Management Strategy.Mahmoud Salem & Opal-Dawn Martin - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2):95 - 104.
    In the past decade, the use of the Chapter XI has soared to the detriment of many creditors, workers, and consumers. A good number of cases were not based on imminent insolvency, but on firms attempts to avoid litigation claims against them, to terminate labor or other contractual obligations, or to gain new financing.These filings for Chapter XI highlight the use of bank-ruptcy as a strategic option used by management in running a viable organization. This usage is even advised by (...)
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  35.  5
    The Archery of "Wisdom" in the Stream of Life: "Wisdom" in the Four Books with Zhu Xi's Reflections.Kirill O. Thompson - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):330-344.
    Confucian wisdom is commonly assumed to consist in the Confucian value perspective as humanism in a naturalistic outlook. In fact, Confucius and Mencius sketched out a far more interesting notion of wisdom as rooted in cognizance and flexibility and expressed in sensitive discernment and the ability to read and respond to complex, changing circumstances--to read the writing on the wall. Whereas the notions of tradition and the Way are thought to weigh heavily in the Confucian perspective, the deeper insight and (...)
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  36.  9
    Returning to Zhu Xi: Emerging Patterns Within the Supreme Polarity Ed. By David Jones and Jinli He.On-cho Ng - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 68 (1):321-324.
    Lest we take Zhu Xi merely as a grand synthesizer who, in the words of Wing-tsit Chan, made "Neo-Confucianism truly Confucian" by countering and assimilating Buddhist and Daoist influences, this volume urges us to regard him as a profound philosopher who brought metaphysical and cosmological insights to bear on ethical cultivation and social praxis. The twelve essays assembled in Returning to Zhu Xi: Emerging Patterns within the Supreme Polarity, edited by David Jones and Jinli He, examine the manifold aspects of (...)
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  37.  6
    Zhu Xi and Meister Eckhart: Two Intellectual Profiles by Shuhong Zheng.Catherine Hudak Klancer - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (2):1-3.
    Shuhong Zheng's scrupulously researched book succeeds in putting two men from different cultures into fruitful and relevant conversation with each other.Comparative studies have many minefields to avoid, and Zheng navigates her way around them with her circumscribed methodology. Rather than comparing Christianity and Confucianism, and hence putting herself at risk for making unsustainable claims about either of these complex traditions, she concentrates on specific elements of the thought of two individuals, Zhu Xi and Meister Eckhart: their shared focus on the (...)
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  38.  29
    Acerca de las funciones del adab en la sociedad andalusí del s. V/XI: código críptico y elite cultural.José Mohedano Barceló - 2004 - Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 25 (2):503-538.
    En el presente artículo pretendemos reflexionar acerca de algunos de los parámetros que determinan la producción de literatura (adab) en al-Andalus en la segunda mitad del s. v/Xí y, más concretamente, levantar algunas hipótesis acerca de las relaciones entre un modelo literario cargado de códigos encriptados, dando especial relieve a la correspondencia personal (al-rasá 'ti al-(jwániyyáí), y la adopción de dicho sistema como lenguaje particular por parte de una elite Político-cultural cuyo entorno histórico procuramos definir.
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  39.  46
    Zhu Xi and Thomas Aquinas on the Foundations of Moral Self-Cultivation.Andrew J. Dell’Olio - 2003 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:235-246.
    The twelfth-century Neo-Confucian philosopher, Zhu Xi, has often been compared to the thirteenth-century Christian philosopher, Thomas Aquinas. In this essay, I explore the similarities between these two thinkers, focusing on their respective accounts of the metaphysical foundations of moral self-cultivation. I suggestthat both philosophers play similar roles within their respective traditions and share similar aims. In general, both philosophers seek to appropriate ideas of rivalintellectual traditions in order to extend the moral vision of their home traditions, and both hope to (...)
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  40.  23
    Self-Deception, Sincerity , and Zhu Xi’s Last Word.Zemian Zheng - 2015 - International Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):345-362.
    Zhu Xi believes that if one attains genuine knowledge of good and evil, one will do good and avoid evil wholeheartedly. As a result, the phenomena of self-deception and akrasia pose a challenge to his moral psychology. On his deathbed, he revised his commentary on self-deception and sincerity in the book Great Learning. His final explanatory model could be understood as a moderate version of intentionalism: a self-deceiver tacitly allows room for thoughts that run counter to his ethical beliefs, even (...)
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  41.  14
    Totality and Idolatry: Rereading Pius XI.John J. Conley - 2001 - Catholic Social Science Review 6:165-174.
    In three encyclicals, Pius XI denounces the abuses of totalitarian regimes: fascism, national socialism, and communism. The Pope argues that the motor of the human rights abuses operative in each regime is idolatry. Totalitarian movements have placed respectively the state, race, and class in the place of God. The prophetic defense of the rights of the persecuted entails a theological critique of the idolatrous substitutes for God and of the counterfeit Christianity fabricated by totalitarian movements.
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  42. The Question of Lacanian Ontology: Badiou and Žižek as Responses to Seminar XI.Michael Austin - 2011 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 5 (2).
    In Seminar XI, Lacan begins by saying that the seminar will be a response to the question of ontology posed at the close of Seminar X. What emerges from this question is a new priority given to thinking the Real, as well as his famous myth of the lamella and his clearest writings on the death drive. This paper proposes that the metaphysical works of both Žižek and Badiou aim to answer the same question posed by Jacques-Alain Miller, “What is (...)
     
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  43.  26
    The Vatican, Racism, and Anti-Semitism Between Pius XI and Pius XII.Valerio De Cesaris - 2013 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2013 (164):117-149.
    ExcerptIn 1938, when anti-Jewish Racial Laws were passed in Italy, Pope Pius XI and Mussolini went through a long confrontation on the racial problem: for the Duce of Fascism, anything related to racial policies fell within the competence of the Italian government and had nothing to do with religion, hence the Vatican had no authority to intervene; conversely, for the Pope, racism was a dangerous heresy and, as such, had to be condemned by the Catholic Church. This confrontation was harsh (...)
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  44.  25
    Xunzi and Zhu Xi.John Berthrong - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):400-416.
    Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 ironically once wrote that Zhu Xi 朱熹 could be considered Xunzi's 荀子 philosophical revenge on Mengzi 孟子. Mou implied that when you retreat from Zhu's staunch rhetorical support of Mengzi philosophy, what you discover are all kinds of significant analogies between the philosophical lexicon as well as deeper structural affinities between Xunzi and Zhu Xi. We discover, ironically, that there is a great deal of merit in Mou's offhanded suggestion of the comparison of two of the greatest (...)
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  45.  32
    Zhu Xi's Spirituality: A New Interpretation of the Great Learning.Diana Arghirescu - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):272-289.
    This essay analyzes the spiritual dimension of Zhu Xi's thought as reflected in his commentary on the four inner stages of the Great Learning (the Daxue《大學》). I begin with a presentation of the notions “spirituality,” “religion,” and “practice,” and of the interpretative methods used. I then examine the signification of Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucian numinous root as embodied in the luminous moral potentiality, investigate from this perspective each one of the four inner stages of the Great Learning, and point out the (...)
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  46.  12
    Intellect and Will in Zhu Xi and Meister Eckhart.Shuhong Zheng - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1319-1339.
    Such is the significance of the question concerning intellect and will that it has been discussed in both the Confucian and the Christian traditions and has even triggered two different schools of thought within each tradition. In Confucianism, it speaks of the fundamental divergence between lixue 理學 and xinxue 心學 in the Neo-Confucian movement. In the Christian tradition, it speaks of the difference between the Franciscans and the Dominicans. A comparative study of Zhu Xi, the leading master of lixue in (...)
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  47.  21
    On Zhu Xi'S Metaphysical Theory of "Investigating Things" [Gewu].Deng Aimin - 1983 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 14 (3):35-96.
    In order to establish his "school of principle" system of thought, which was founded on objective idealism, Zhu Xi proposed a theory of "investigating things and exhausting principles" [gewu qiongli]. This became the epistemological foundation for his system of thought. This epistemology formed an organic whole with his world view. On the one hand, his "theory-of-investigating-things" epistemology opened up pathways for his system of objective idealism; on the other hand, his "school-of-principle" system formed the theoretical foundation for his epistemology of (...)
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  48.  20
    The Inner Contradiction in Zhu Xi's Thoughts——An Analysis of the Possibility of a Metamorphosis From Zhu Zi's Philosophy to Yangming's Philosophy.Lin Dan - 2008 - Modern Philosophy 6:016.
    Zhu had originally thought throughout the domain for life, for the "metaphysical" and "physical" between the living environment of the deep feelings. However, Zhu could not resist the idea in the history of the final ready-made common tendency, eventually leading to and thought, metaphysical and physical fragmentation. Wang Yangming thought of a great significance is to overcome this inherent Zhu thought the inconsistency. Zhu Xi's thinking is deeply concerned with the life horizon between the "metaphysical" sphere and the "physical" one. (...)
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  49.  11
    Il concetto agostiniano di futuro: "Confessiones", XI.Maurizio Filippo Di Silva - 2015 - Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 56 (131):129-148.
    O objetivo deste artigo é examinar o conceito agostiniano de futuro tal como aparece em "Confissões", XI. Buscaremos mostrar que a noção de futuro é tanto uma parte constitutiva quanto uma expressão própria do conceito agostiniano de tempo. Vamos analisar inicialmente a reflexão agostiniana concernente à criação do mundo e à pergunta acerca do ser do tempo. Em seguida, vamos examinar o conceito de instante e sua natureza cinética. A terceira parte tratará da reflexão agostiniana sobre a medida do tempo, (...)
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  50.  5
    The Self-Centeredness Objection to Virtue Ethics: Zhu Xi’s Neo-Confucian Response.Yong Huang - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):651-692.
    As virtue ethics has developed into maturity, it has also met with a number of objections. This essay focuses on the self-centeredness objection: since virtue ethics recommends that we be concerned with our own virtues or virtuous characters, it is self-centered. In response, I first argue that, for Zhu Xi’s neo-Confucianism, the character that a virtuous person is concerned with consists largely in precisely those virtues that incline him or her to be concerned with the good of others. While such (...)
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