Results for 'Yogacara (Buddhism'

75 found
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  1. Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogācāra Buddhism and the Chʼeng Wei-Shih Lun.Dan Lusthaus - 2003 - Routledgecurzon.
  2.  8
    Yogacara Buddhism: A Sympathetic Description and Suggestion for Use in Western Theology and Philosophy of Religion.David Pensgard - 2010 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (15):94-103.
    A defense of Yogacara Buddhism in light of contemporary trends in Western philosophy and theology, this paper begins with an historical survey and proceeds with a comparative analysis. Yogacara was successful in addressing the same problems 1600 years ago that many in the West have failed to address, or even recognize today. With its metaphysical and epistemological implications, Yogacara may also be employed in the resolution of, or continuing investigation into, long-standing problems within Christian theology over and (...)
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  3.  50
    A Defense of Yogācāra Buddhism.Alex Wayman - 1996 - Philosophy East and West 46 (4):447-476.
    It is claimed that misrepresentations of Yogācāra Buddhism appeared in older and later works in India, and then in European and other scholarship. The thesis that Yogācāra denies external existence is rejected, the defense being this Buddhist system's own response. Two major sections divide the argument: (1) The Position of the Yogācārins and (2) Three Clarifications of the Position.
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  4.  91
    Idealism and Yogacara Buddhism.Saam Trivedi - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (3):231 – 246.
    Over the last several years, there has been a growing controversy about whether Yogacara Buddhism can be said to be idealist in some sense, as used to be commonly thought by earlier scholars. In this paper, I first clarify the different senses of idealism that might be pertinent to the debate. I then focus on some of the works of Vasubandhu, limiting myself to his Vimsatika, Trimsika, and Trisvabhavanirdesa. I argue that classical Yogacara Buddhism, at least as found (...)
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  5.  24
    Hegelian 'Absolute Idealism' with Yogācāra Buddhism on Consciousness, Concept ( Begriff ), and Co-Dependent Origination ( Pratītyasamutpāda ).Adam Scarfe - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1):47-73.
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  6.  21
    Whitehead's Doctrine of Objectification and Yogācāra Buddhism's Theory of the Three Natures.Adam C. Scarfe - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (2):111-125.
  7.  3
    Whitehead's Doctrine of Objectification and Yogācāra Buddhism's Theory of the Three Natures.Adam C. Scarfe - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (2):111-125.
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  8.  5
    Contexts and Dialogue: Yogācāra Buddhism and Modern Psychology on the Subliminal Mind, And: Sciousness (Review).Benjamin J. Chicka - 2010 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 30 (1):201-205.
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  9. Husserl and Yogacara. Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogacara Buddhism and the Ch'eng Wei-Shih Lun, Dan Lusthaus: Book Review. [REVIEW]Plamen Gradinarov - 2005 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 5 (1).
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  10.  29
    From Inwardness to Emptiness: Kierkegaard and Yogacara Buddhism.James Giles - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):311 – 340.
  11.  13
    Knowledge and Transcendence: Modern Idealist Philosophy & Yogacara Buddhism (Part 2).Hase Shoto - 1984 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 11 (1):1-77.
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  12.  43
    Wisdom Beyond Words? Ineffability in Yogācāra and Madhyamaka Buddhism.David Burton - 2000 - Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):53-76.
    (2000). Wisdom beyond words? Ineffability in yogācāra and madhyamaka buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-76. doi: 10.1080/14639940008573721.
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  13.  28
    The One and the Many: Yogācāra Buddhism and Husserl.Mary J. Larrabee - 1981 - Philosophy East and West 31 (1):3-15.
  14.  12
    Knowledge and Transcendence: Modern Idealist Philosophy and Yogācāra Buddhism (Part I).Shōtō Hase - 1984 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 11 (1):77-93.
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  15.  42
    Contexts and Dialogue: Yogācāra Buddhism and Modern Psychology on the Subliminal Mind – by Tao Jiang.Peter D. Hershock - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):371–375.
  16.  14
    Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogacara Buddhism and the Ch'eng Wei-Shih Lun (Review).Charles Muller - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (1):135-139.
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  17.  2
    From Inwardness to Emptiness: Kierkegaard and Yogācāra Buddhism.James Giles - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):311-340.
  18.  1
    Knowledge and Transcendence: Modern Idealist Philosophy and Yogācāra Buddhism.Shoto Hase - 1984 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 11 (1).
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  19. Review of Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogacara Buddhism and the Ch'eng Wei-Shih Lun by Dan Lusthaus. [REVIEW]Muller Charles - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (1):135-139.
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  20.  96
    Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation.Jay L. Garfield - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  21. The Yogacara School of Buddhism: A Bibliography.John Powers - 1991 - Scarecrow Press.
    A comprehensive guide to scriptural sources and authors, translations and critical editions of texts, and books and articles on Yogacara and related topics.
     
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  22. The Yogācārā and Mādhyamika Interpretations of the Buddha-Nature Concept in Chinese Buddhism.Ming-Wood Liu - 1985 - Philosophy East and West 35 (2):171-193.
  23.  46
    Interpretation of Yogācāra Philosophy in Huayan Buddhism.Imre Hamar - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):181-197.
  24. Existence and Enlightenment in the Laṅkāvatāra-Sūtra: A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yogācāra School of Mahāyāna BuddhismExistence and Enlightenment in the Lankavatara-Sutra: A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yogacara School of Mahayana Buddhism.Paul J. Griffiths & Florin Giripescu Sutton - 1992 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 112 (2):345.
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  25. The Continuity of Madhyamaka and Yogācāra in Indian Mahāyāna BuddhismThe Continuity of Madhyamaka and Yogacara in Indian Mahayana Buddhism.John P. Keenan & Ian Charles Harris - 1993 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 113 (1):146.
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  26. The Structure of the Mind According to the Buddhist Idealistic School (Yogacara).F. Tola & C. Dragonetti - 1990 - Pensamiento 46 (182):129-147.
     
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  27.  8
    Light as an Analogy for Cognition in Buddhist Idealism (Vijñānavāda).Alex Watson - 2014 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (2-3):401-421.
    In Sect. 1 an argument for Yogācāra Buddhist Idealism, here understood as the view that everything in the universe is of the nature of consciousness / cognition, is laid out. The prior history of the argument is also recounted. In Sect. 2 the role played in this argument by light as an analogy for cognition is analyzed. Four separate aspects of the light analogy are discerned. In Sect. 3, I argue that although light is in some ways a helpful analogy (...)
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  28.  53
    Mipam's Middle Way Through Yogācāra and Prāsaṅgika.D. S. Duckworth - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):431-439.
    In Tibet, the negative dialectics of Madhyamaka are typically identified with Candrakīrti’s interpretation of Nāgārjuna, and systematic epistemology is associated with Dharmakīrti. These two figures are also held to be authoritative commentators on a univocal doctrine of Buddhism. Despite Candrakīrti’s explicit criticism of Buddhist epistemologists in his Prasannapadā, Buddhists in Tibet have integrated the theories of Candrakīrti and Dharmakīrti in unique ways. Within this integration, there is a tension between the epistemological system-building on the one hand, and “deconstructive” negative dialectics (...)
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  29.  50
    Philosophy of Mind in Sixth-Century China: Paramārtha's "Evolution of Consciousness".Diana Y. Paul - 1984 - Stanford University Press.
    Of the many translators who carried the Buddhist doctrine to China, Paramartha, a missionary-monk who arrived in China in AD 546, ranks as the translator par excellence of the sixth century. Introducing philosophical ideas that would subsequently excite the Chinese imagination to develop the great schools of Sui and T'ang Buddhism, Paramartha's translations are almost exclusively of Yogacara Buddhist texts on the nature of the mind and consciousness. This first study of Paramartha in a Western language focuses on the (...)
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  30.  3
    Buddhist Philosophy of Language in India: Jnanasrimitra's Monograph on Exclusion.Lawrence J. McCrea - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    This volume marks the first English translation of Jnanasrimitra's Monograph on Exclusion, a careful, critical investigation into language, perception, and conceptual awareness.
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  31. Ālayavijñāna: On the Origin and the Early Development of a Central Concept of Yogācāra Philosophy: Reprint with Addenda and Corrigenda.Lambert Schmithausen - 1987 - International Institute for Buddhist Studies of the International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies.
    pt. 1 Text -- pt. 2 Notes, bibliography and indices.
     
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  32.  19
    Buddhist Philosophy and the Ideals of Environmentalism.Colette Sciberras - 2010 - Dissertation, Durham University
    I examine the consistency between contemporary environmentalist ideals and Buddhist philosophy, focusing, first, on the problem of value in nature. I argue that the teachings found in the Pāli canon cannot easily be reconciled with a belief in the intrinsic value of life, whether human or otherwise. This is because all existence is regarded as inherently unsatisfactory, and all beings are seen as impermanent and insubstantial, while the ultimate spiritual goal is often viewed, in early Buddhism, as involving a deep (...)
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  33.  5
    Does Early Yogācāra Have a Theory of Meaning? Sthiramati’s Arguments on Metaphor in the Triṃśikā-Bhāṣya.Roy Tzohar - 2017 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 45 (1):99-120.
    Can the early Yogācāra be said to present a systematic theory of meaning? The paper argues that Sthiramati’s bhāṣya on Vasubandhu’s Triṃśikā, in which he argues that all language-use is metaphorical, indeed amounts to such a theory, both because of the text’s engagement with the wider Indian philosophical conversation about reference and meaning and by virtue of the questions it addresses and its motivations. Through a translation and analysis of key sections of Sthiramati’s commentary I present the main features of (...)
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  34.  40
    Review of Mark Siderits, Buddhism as Philosophy. [REVIEW]Peter Jilks - 2008 - Sophia 47 (1):79-82.
    Siderits’ book is a welcome contribution to the ongoing dialogue between Buddhism and Western analytic philosophy. It covers the three main areas of philosophical enquiry—metaphysics, ethics and epistemology. Although conceptually quite challenging in places, the information is always presented in a pedagogic, evolutionary and highly readable manner. There are occasional problems with Siderits’ approach of isolating Buddhism as philosophy from Buddhism as religion, particularly in his chapter on ethics, which cannot avoid being somewhat unbalanced, and possibly misrepresentational, as it skirts (...)
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  35.  19
    Two Models of the Two Truths: Ontological and Phenomenological Approaches. [REVIEW]Douglas S. Duckworth - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (5):519-527.
    Mipam (‘ju mi pham rgya mtsho, 1846–1912), an architect of the Nyingma (rnying ma) tradition of Tibet in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, articulates two distinct models of the two truths that are respectively reflected in Madhyamaka and Yogācāra Buddhist traditions. The way he positions these two models sheds light on how levels of description are at play in his integration of these traditions. Mipam positions one kind of two-truth model as the product of an ontological analysis while (...)
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  36.  1
    The Buddhist Roots of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics of Emptiness.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):606-635.
    Watsuji Tetsurô is famous for having constructed a systematic socio-political ethics on the basis of the idea of emptiness. This essay examines his 1938 essay “The Concept of ‘Dharma’ and the Dialectics of Emptiness in Buddhist Philosophy” and the posthumously published The History of Buddhist Ethical Thought, in order to clarify the Buddhist roots of his ethics. It aims to answer two main questions which are fundamentally linked: “Which way does Watsuji's legacy turn: toward totalitarianism or toward a balanced theory (...)
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  37.  20
    Gradual and Sudden Enlightenment: The Attainment of Yogipratyakṣa in the Later Indian Yogācāra School. [REVIEW]Jeson Woo - 2009 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (2):179-188.
    In the later Indian Yogācāra school, yogipratyakṣa, the cognition of yogins is a key concept used to explain the Buddhist goal of enlightenment. It arises through the practice of meditation upon the Four Noble Truths. The method of the practice is to contemplate their aspects with attention (sādara), without interruption (nairantarya), and over a long period of time (dīrghakāla). A problem occurs in this position since Buddhists hold the theory of momentariness: how is possible that a yogin attains yogipratyakṣa even (...)
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  38.  19
    Shakya Chokden's Interpretation of the Ratnagotravibhāga: “Contemplative” or “Dialectical”? [REVIEW]Yaroslav Komarovski - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):441-452.
    This reconciliation of the dialectical and contemplative approaches to the buddha-essence is related to and closely resembles Shakchok’s reconciliation of the two approaches to ultimate reality advocated respectively by Niḥsvabhāvavāda (ngo bo nyid med par smra ba, “Proponents of Entitylessness”) system of Madhyamaka and Alīkākāravāda (rnam rdzun pa, “False Aspectarians”) system of Yogācāra. These approaches in turn are connected respectively to the explicit teachings (dngos bstan) of the second dharmacakra (chos ’khor, “Wheel of Dharma”) and the definitive teachings (nges don, (...)
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  39.  9
    The Problem of the Unity of Consciousness: A Buddhist Solution.Monima Chadha - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):746-764.
    In the last decade, the research into the sciences of the mind has witnessed what some aptly call a “consciousness boom”. This boom has resulted in a new willingness to include the earlier frowned-upon discussions of dimensions, traditions, and practices into these sciences. Nowadays it is commonplace to find philosophers and scientists engaging in discussions of Conscious Presence, Subjectivity, Out-of-Body Experiences, Meditation, Phenomenology, and, more recently, Asian—particularly Indian—theories of the mind. This essay contributes to this process by showing that Yogācāra (...)
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  40.  4
    Book Review Husserl and Yogacara By Dan Lusthaus (2002). [REVIEW]Plamen Gradinarov - 2005 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 5 (1).
    Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogacara Buddhism and the Ch'eng Wei-shih Lun. London: Routledge-Curzon. (611 pages). ISBN 0-7007-1186-4 Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology , Volume 5, Edition 1 April 2005.
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  41. Saugataśāṅkaradvaitavādasamīkṣā.Ādityanātha Bhaṭṭācāryya - 2006 - Kr̥ṣṇagañja Devavāṇī Mandira.
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  42.  2
    Zur Sache des Bewusstseins: Phänomenologie, Buddhismus, Konfuzianismus.Liangkang Ni - 2010 - Königshausen & Neumann.
  43. Transcending Ego: Distinguishing Consciousness From Wisdom ( Tib. Namshe Yeshe Gepa) of Rangjung Dorje, the Third Karmapa. Raṅ-Byuṅ-Rdo-Rje - 2001 - Namo Buddha Publications.
     
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  44. Yongming Yanshou Xin Xue Yan Jiu.Qingqing Tian - 2010 - Ba Shu Shu She.
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  45. The Trisvabhāvanirdeśa of Vasubandhu. Vasubandhu - 1939 - Visvabharati.
     
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  46. Paving the Great Way: Vasubandhu's Unifying Buddhist Philosophy.Jonathan Gold - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Indian Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu is known for his critical contribution to Buddhist Abhidharma thought, his turn to the Mahayana tradition, and his concise, influential Yogacara-Vijñanavada texts. _Paving the Great Way_ reveals another dimension of his legacy: his integration of several seemingly incompatible intellectual and scriptural traditions, with far-ranging consequences for the development of Buddhist epistemology and the theorization of tantra. Most scholars read Vasubandhu's texts in isolation and separate his intellectual development into distinct phases. Featuring close studies of (...)
     
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  47. Buddhism and Techno-Physicalism: Is the Eightfold Path a Program?Mark Siderits - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (3):307-314.
    Recent developments in technology and material culture suggest that physicalism may come to be accepted as the commonsense view of the constitution of persons. Like many other spiritual practices, Buddhism has traditionally relied on a dualist understanding of human nature, according to which persons are made up of both physical and nonphysical entities and events. Would anything central to the Buddhist project be lost if that were replaced by physicalism? Clearly the Yogācāra doctrine of consciousness-only would be undermined. But it (...)
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  48.  40
    A Buddhist Epistemological Framework for Mindfulness Meditation.Monima Chadha - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (1):65-80.
    One of the major aims of this article is to provide the theoretical account of mindfulness provided by the systematic Abhidharma epistemology of conscious states. I do not claim to present the one true version of mindfulness, because there is not one version of it in Buddhism; in addition to the Abhidharma model, there is, for example, the nondual Mahāmudrā tradition. A better understanding of a Buddhist philosophical framework will not only help situate meditation practice in its originating tradition, but (...)
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  49.  34
    Dual and Non-Dual Ontology in Satre and MahāyāNa Buddhism.Derek K. Heyman - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):431-443.
    This paper examines Sartre's dualistic ontology in the light of the non-duality asserted by Mahayana Buddhism. In the first section, I show, against the objection of Hazel E. Barnes, that Sartre and Buddhism have comparable theories of consciousness. The second section discusses Steven W. Laycock's use of Zen philosophy to solve the Sartrean metaphysical problem regarding the origin of being for-itself. This solution involves rejecting the ontological priority of being in-itself in favor of the Buddhist understanding of interdependent origination (pratitya-samutpada) (...)
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  50.  22
    Moral Realism and Anti-Realism Outside the West: A Meta-Ethical Turn in Buddhist Ethics.Gordon Fraser Davis - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2).
    In recent years, discussions of Buddhist ethics have increasingly drawn upon the concepts and tools of modern ethical theory, not only to compare Buddhist perspectives with Western moral theories, but also to assess the meta-ethical implications of Buddhist texts and their philosophical context. Philosophers aiming to defend the Madhyamaka framework in particular – its ethics and soteriology along with its logic and epistemology – have recently attempted to explain its combination of moral commitment and philosophical scepticism by appealing to various (...)
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