Order:
  1.  70
    Do Corporations Invest Enough in Environmental Responsibility?Yongtae Kim & Meir Statman - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):115-129.
    Proponents of corporate environmental responsibility argue that corporations shortchange shareholders by investing too little in environmental responsibility. They claim that corporations can improve their financial performance by increasing their investment in environmental responsibility. Opponents of corporate social responsibility argue that corporations shortchange shareholders by investing too much in environmental responsibility. They claim that corporations can improve their financial performance by reducing their investment in environmental responsibility. Yet, others claim that corporations serve their shareholders well by investing just enough in social (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  2.  52
    Ethics and Disclosure: A Study of the Financial Performance of Firms in the Seasoned Equity Offerings Market.Hoje Jo & Yongtae Kim - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):855-878.
    In this article, we examine the association between ethics and disclosure and the impact of this association on the long-term, post-issue performance of seasoned equity offerings (SEOs). We argue that firms with extensive disclosure are less likely to face information problems, and more likely to lead to an active shareholder monitoring, and therefore, engage in fewer unethical activities, such as aggressive earnings manipulation, and have better long-term, post-issue performance. Consistent with these predictions, this study presents evidence that disclosure is negatively (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3.  17
    Is Institutional Ownership Related to Corporate Social Responsibility? The Nonlinear Relation and Its Implication for Stock Return Volatility.Maretno Harjoto, Hoje Jo & Yongtae Kim - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):77-109.
    This study examines the relation between corporate social responsibility and institutional investor ownership, and the impact of this relation on stock return volatility. We find that institutional ownership does not strictly increase or decrease in CSR; rather, institutional ownership is a concave function of CSR. This evidence suggests that institutional investors do not see CSR as strictly value-enhancing activities. Institutional investors adjust their percentage of ownership when CSR activities go beyond the perceived optimal level. Employing the path analysis, we also (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation