Results for 'Yue Xi'

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  1.  9
    A Time Series Analysis of the Effects of Financial Incentives and Mandatory Clinical Applications as Interventions to Improve Spontaneous Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting by Hospital Medical Staff in China.Feng Chang, Yue Xi, Jie Zhao, Xiaojian Zhang & Yun Lu - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (6):1316-1321.
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  2.  14
    The Art of Lamentation in the Works of Pan Yue: "Mourning the Eternally Departed".C. M. Lai & Pan Yue - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (3):409-425.
  3. Haidege, Gaodamei, da Sheng Fo Xue Yu Song Ming Li Xue: Xi Fang Quan Shi Xue Yu Han Yue Zhe Xue (Yi).Jingzhong Lu (ed.) - 2009 - Taiwan Jidu Jiao Wen Yi Chu Ban She.
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  4. Bi Jiao Yu Chao Yue: Shi Ji Zhi Jiao Zhong Xi Wen Lun Zhi Bi Jiao Yan Jiu.Yisheng Zhang - 2004 - Zhongguo She Hui Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
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  5. Zhu Xi Yin Yue Zhu Shu Ji Si Xiang Yan Jiu: Zhuxi Yinyue Zhushu Ji Sixiang Yanjiu.Junhui Zheng - 2010 - Ren Min Jiao Yu Chu Ban She.
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  6.  60
    Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,”.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender. pp. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophys encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. InNeo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family (...)
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  7.  93
    Emotion, Desire, and Numismatic Experience in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming.Brian Bruya - 2001 - Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:45-75.
    In this article, I explore the relationship between desire and emotion in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming with the aim of demonstrating 1) that Zhu Xi, (...)
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  8.  35
    Fate and the Good Life: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yagyongs Discourse on Ming.Youngsun Back - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):255-274.
    This essay examines the Ru notion of ming , usually translated into English asfate,” with an emphasis on the thought of two prominent Ru thinkers, (...)
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  9.  39
    Culture as Common Sense: Perceived Consensus Vs. Personal Beliefs as Mechanisms of Cultural Influence.Tam Kim-Pong, Morris Michael, Lee Sau-lai, Lau Ivy Yee-Man, Chiu Chi-yue & Zou Xi - unknown
    We propose that culture affects people through their perceptions of what is consensually believed. Whereas past research has examined whether cultural differences in social judgment are mediated (...)
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  10.  58
    Does Zhu Xi Distinguish Prudence From Morality?Justin Tiwald - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):359-368.
    In Stephen Angles Sagehood, he contends that Neo-Confucian philosophers reject ways of moral thinking that draw hard and fast lines between self-directed or prudential concerns (...)
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  11.  23
    New Developments in Zhu Xi Studies: A Hermeneutical Study of Returning to Zhu Xi.Diana Arghirescu - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1):88-95.
    This essay presents and examines the book Returning to Zhu Xi: Emerging Patterns within the Supreme Polarity edited by David Jones and Jinli He. I argue that (...)
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  12.  77
    Zhu Xis Choice, Historical Criticism and InfluenceAn Analysis of Zhu Xis Relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism.Weixiang Ding - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):521-548.
    As a great synthesist for the School of Principles of the Northern and Southern Song dynasties, Zhu Xis influence over the School of Principles was demonstrated (...)not only through his positive theoretical creation, but also through his choice and critical awareness. Zhus relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism is a typical case; and his activities, ranging from his research of Buddhism (the Chan School) in his early days to his farewell to the Chan School as a student of Li Dong from Yanping and then to his critical awareness of the Chan School, developed in his association with Wang Yingchen, set the entire course of his relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism. It fostered his antagonistic attitude towards the Chan School, which lasted his entire life. Zhu approached the Chan School mainly as an objective social and cultural phenomenon; his discrimination between Confucianism and Buddhism was from an epistemological point of view; and his refutation of the Chan School was mainly from the point of view of language and methodology, an antagonistic attitude of how to face learning. Therefore, his opposition to the Chan School not only directly fostered an awareness of the Confucians of the Ming dynasty against Buddhism, who simply viewed the latter as an external and objective existence, but to a certain extent resulted in the disappearance of the transcendence of the School of Principles, and caused a total change in academic direction during the Ming and Qing dynasties and the formation of the Qianjia Hanxue . What is more, such an opposition to Buddhism continues to influence peoples understanding of the School of Principles. (shrink)
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  13.  30
    Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender,. pp. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophys encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. InNeo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family (...)
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  14.  10
    Neural Dynamics During Resting State: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Exploration with Reduction and Visualization.Wei Li, Miao Wang, Wen Wen, Yue Huang, Xi Chen & Wenliang Fan - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-10.
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  15.  68
    Flowing Within the Text: A Discussion on He Lins Explanation of Zhu Xis Method of Intuition.Xianglong Zhang - 2005 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):60-65.
    The author examines He Lin's interpretation of Zhu Xi's method of intuition from a phenomenological-hermeneutical perspective and by exposing Zhu's philosophical presuppositions. In contrast (...)with Lu Xiangshan's intuitive method, Zhu Xi's method of reading classics advocates "emptying your heart and flowing with the text" and, in this spirit, explains the celebrated "exhaustive investigation on the principles of things (ge wu qiong li)." "Text," according to Zhu, is therefore not an object in ordinary sense but a "contextual region" or "sensible pattern" that, when merged with the reader, generates meanings. Furthermore, by discussing the related doctrines of Lao Zi, Zhuang Zi, Hua-Yan Buddhism, Zhou Dunyi, and Zhu Xi's own "One principle with many manifestations (li yi fen shu)," the author identifies the philosophical preconditions of Zhu's method. Based on this analysis, the author goes on to illustrate Zhu's understanding of "observing potential yet unapparent pleasure, anger, sorrow and happiness" and "maintaining a serious attitude (zhu jing).". (shrink)
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  16.  25
    Dai Zhens Criticism and Misunderstanding of Zhu Xis Moral Theory.Zemian Zheng - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):433-449.
    Dai Zhen 戴震 criticizes Song-Ming 宋明 Neo-Confucianism, especially Zhu Xis 朱熹 dichotomy between principle and desires and his claim that principle is received from Heaven (...)
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  17.  51
    The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu Xis Discussion ofDreams”—And onConfucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”.Yu Chang - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
    Dreams were a topic of study even in ancient times, and they are a special spiritual phenomenon. Generations of literati have defined the meaning of dreams in (...)
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  18. Comentários literários, estilísticos E sintáticos sobre O epodo XI de horácio.Aline Chagas dos Santos - 2011 - Principia: Revista do Departamento de Letras Clássicas e Orientais do Instituto de Letras 2 (23):29-44.
    Augusto foi um governante admirável que, durante o longo tempo de seu império, fez com que a paz reinasse em Roma e com ela o mundo prosperasse. (...)
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  19.  16
    The Significance of Shendu in the Interpretation of Classical Learning and Zhu Xis Misreading.Tao Liang - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):305-321.
    According to recently excavated bamboo and silk material, the idea of du in the concept shendu 慎獨 does not refer to a spatial notion of dwelling (...)
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  20.  10
    The Confucian Canons Pivotal and Problematic Middle Era: Reflecting on the Northern Song Masters and Zhu Xi.Hui Yin & Hoyt Tillman - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (1):95-105.
    Zhu Xis 朱熹 interpretations systematized the Five Classics; moreover, he elevated theFour Booksto such a supra-canonical status that these texts along with his commentaries (...) became the core curriculum for civil service examinations from the early 13th century to the 20th century. Inquiring into what was the essential and unique Song character of Classical scholarship, we will highlight the canonical Ritual Classics because these texts were crucial for centuries, especially during the Han through Tang dynasties. We show how Zhu updated ritual practices by focusing on the Yili 儀禮 as the crucial Classic for guidelines on etiquette, and also rebalanced the relation between rituals and moralprinciples.” We will explore how Zhus systematization of moral principles and ritual did not fully resolve tensions from his major 11th-century philosophical predecessors regarding principles and ritual, as well as the Four Books and the Five Classics. Even if Dai Zhens 戴震 criticism of Zhu was somewhat misplaced or overstated, tensions within Zhus views provide us a basis for understanding Dais attacks and ambivalence among Qing and 20th-century scholars toward Zhu Xis philosophy. (shrink)
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  21.  22
    Zhu Xi: Selected Writings.Philip J. Ivanhoe (ed.) - 2019 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press (Oxford Chinese Thought).
    This volume contains nine chapters of translation, by a range of leading scholars, focusing on core themes in the philosophy of Zhu Xi (1130-1200), one of (...)the most influential Chinese thinkers of the later Confucian tradition. -/- Table of Contents: Chapter One: Metaphysics, Epistemology, and Ethics by Philip J. Ivanhoe Chapter Two: Moral Psychology and Cultivating the Self by Curie Virág Chapter Three: Politics and Government by Justin Tiwald Chapter Four: Poetry, Literature, Textual Study, and Hermeneutics by On-cho Ng Chapter Five: Social Conditions of His Time by Beverly Bossler Chapter Six: Heaven, Ghosts and Spirits, and Ritual by Hoyt Tillman Chapter Seven: Criticisms of Buddhism, Daoism, and the Learning of the Heart-mind by Ellen Neskar and Ari Borrell Chapter Eight: Science and Natural Philosophy by Yung Sik Kim Chapter Nine: Zhu Xi's Commentarial Work: Abiding in the Mean and the Constant by Daniel Gardner. (shrink)
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  22.  51
    Zhu Xi's Critique of Buddhism: Selfishness, Salvation, and Self-Cultivation.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In John Makeham (ed.), The Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi's Philosophical Thought. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 122-155.
    This article (1) offers a relatively comprehensive survey of criticisms of Buddhism made by the influential Chinese philosopher Zhu Xi 朱熹 (1130-1200) with translations of key (...)passages, and (2) proposes that these criticisms are best understood as targeting the implicit presuppositions and practical implications of Buddhist teachings, not so much the explicit doctrines of the Buddhists. The article examines three sets of criticisms. The first has to do with Buddhist soteriology, the fundamental priority of Buddhist salvation, which Zhu takes to be egoistic and a corruption of the more relationship-oriented nature of ethics itself. The second set of criticisms concerns Buddhist over-reliance on meditation as a form of mental discipline, which in Zhus view leaves Buddhists ill-equipped to take independent standards of right and wrong into account. He proposes instead that Confucianreverential attention” (jing ) is the better means by which to reshape ones intentions and emotions in light of objective standards. The final criticisms are of the Buddhist doctrine of emptiness. Here Zhu seems to be an uncharitable critic, suggesting that Buddhists treat all things as illusory and without a certain ethically significant relationship to the larger world. But a closer examination of the evidence shows that he was both aware of more defensible notions of Buddhist emptiness and, at the end of the day, unconvinced that Buddhist practices were conducive to realizing them. (shrink)
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  23.  19
    The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu Xis Discussion ofDreams”—And onConfucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”.Chang Yu - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
  24. Zhu Xi de Si Wei Shi Jie.Hoyt Cleveland Tillman - 2002
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  25.  8
    The Neo-Confucian Transmoral Dimension of Zhu Xi's Moral Thought.Diana Arghirescu - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (1):52-70.
    This essay is an examination of the perception during the Song dynasty of moral life and human nature as reflected in the moral thought of Zhu Xi (...)
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  26.  25
    Zhu Xi's Reading of the Analects: Canon, Commentary and the Classical Tradition.Daniel Gardner - 2003 - Columbia University Press.
    A pioneering study of Zhu Xi's reading of the Analects, this book demonstrates how commentary is both informed by a text and informs future readings, and (...) highlights the importance of interlinear commentary as a genre in Chinese philosophy. (shrink)
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  27.  90
    The Self-Centeredness Objection to Virtue Ethics: Zhu Xis Neo-Confucian Response.Yong Huang - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):651-692.
    As virtue ethics has developed into maturity, it has also met with a number of objections. This essay focuses on the self-centeredness objection: since virtue ethics (...)recommends that we be concerned with our own virtues or virtuous characters, it is self-centered. In response, I first argue that, for Zhu Xis neo-Confucianism, the character that a virtuous person is concerned with consists largely in precisely those virtues that incline him or her to be concerned with the good of others. While such an answer is also available to the Aristotelian virtue ethics, I argue that Zhu Xis neo-Confucianism can better respond to the objection on two deeper levels: a virtuous person is not only concerned with othersexternal well-being but also their virtuous characters, and a virtuous persons concern with otherswellbeing, both internal and external, is neither self-indulgent nor self-effacing. (shrink)
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  28.  5
    On the Relationship Between Philosophical Constructions and Interpretations of the Classics with a Focus on Zhu Xis Interpretation of the Four Books.Chun-Chieh Huang - 2018 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 49 (3-4):171-185.
    This chapter examines the tension between philosophical construction and classical interpretation. It analyses Zhu Xis very specific philosophical interpretations of early classics, such as the Four (...)Books. As an example of the cross-cultural disputes among the East Asian Confucians, Huang introduces the middle-Tokugawa Confucianscriticisms of Zhus abstract interpretations. (shrink)
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  29. Zhu XI's Prayers to the Spirit of Confucius and Claim to the Transmission of the Way.Hoyt Cleveland Tillman - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (4):489-513.
    : What philosophical and historical insights might be gained by juxtaposing and linking two distinct areas of Zhu Xi's comments, those on guishen (conventionally glossed as ghosts (...)
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  30.  9
    Knowledge, Action, and Virtue in Zhu Xi.Matthew D. Walker - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (2):515-534.
    How are knowing and acting related? Zhu Xi 朱熹 addresses this question with a walking analogy: "Knowledge and action always need each other. It's like how (...)eyes cannot walk without feet, but feet cannot see without eyes. If we discuss them in terms of their sequence, knowledge comes first. But if we discuss them in terms of importance, action is what is important".1 In this analogy, a certain perceptual awareness is causally prior to walking. Such awareness is responsible for the walker's proceeding without obstacle and walking successfully. But, in the analogy, walking is normatively prior to sight. That is, sight's value is subordinated to that of walking: sight is valuable for the sake of... (shrink)
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  31.  15
    Above the Literal Sense: Hermeneutical Rules in Zhu Xi, Eckhart, and Augustine.Shuhong Zheng - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (2):253-276.
    This article is designed to form a question-focused cross-cultural dialogue, rather than compare Zhu Xi 朱熹 with Meister Eckhart in general terms. It will start with (...) an analysis of the exegetical/hermeneutical rules that Zhu Xi and Eckhart set up for their own scriptural commentaries. The study of Eckhart will then be extended to Augustine, in order to explore how Eckhart resorts to Augustine in his commentary writings. Having explored Eckharts affinity with Augustine regarding their consensus about the multiplicity of literal senses, as well as their emphasis on the renewal or the continuous growth of the meaning of scriptural texts, the discussion will come back to the starting point of this comparative model, and attempt to form a comparison between the two traditions, through the exemplars of Zhu Xi, Eckhart, and Augustine, with a focus on the implications of these hermeneutical rules. (shrink)
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  32.  3
    Zhu Xi's Grasp of Buddhism and its Limitations.Chen-Feng Tsai 蔡振豐 - 2019 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 49 (3-4):186-206.
    Zhu Xi was familiar with Buddhism in youth. After devoting himself to Confucianism at age 30, he became critical of Buddhism. The author shows that Zhu Xi (...)
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  33.  3
    Zhu Xis Study of the Chuci and the Tradition of Confucian Aesthetics.Chen Chao-Ying 陳昭瑛 - 2019 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 49 (3-4):207-218.
    Zhu Xi regarded the Chuci as highly as the Shijing. The author argues that Zhus positive reading of Chuci turned on the author Qu Yuans patriotic (...) intent but neglected the cult... (shrink)
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  34.  28
    Moral Emotions, Awareness, and Spiritual Freedom in the Thought of Zhu Xi.Kai Marchal - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):199-220.
    It is well known that the Neo-Confucian thinker Zhu Xi particularly emphasizes the role of emotions in human life. This paper shows that the fourmoral (...)emotionsare central to Zhu's thinking, insofar as only their genuine actualization enables the individual to achieve spiritual freedom. Moreover, I discuss the crucial notions ofawareness’/‘perceptionandknowledge’/‘wisdom’, in order to reveal the complex dynamic that moral emotions are said to create in the moral agent. I also analyse two important passages from the Mencius and examine how Zhu Xi, in his exegetical glosses, defines the conditions of virtuous agency as based on the moral emotions. Finally, I explain the reasons why Neo-Confucians like Zhu Xi have sometimes been described as Kantian thinkers avant la lettre. (shrink)
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  35.  16
    An Alternative Way of Confucian Sincerity: Wang Yangming's "Unity of Knowing and Doing" as a Response to Zhu Xi's Puzzle of Self-Deception.Zemian Zheng - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1345-1368.
    In this essay I offer a new interpretation of Wang Yangming's 王陽明 well-known doctrine of zhi xing he yi 知行合一 by contextualizing it in his endeavor (...) to seek an alternative way of Confucian learning other than Zhu Xi's 朱熹. Both Wang and Zhu Xi understand the ideal of a Confucian sage as cheng , but propose different ways to attain it. To some extent, Wang's original concern has long been neglected. The recent scholarship on Wang's unity of knowing and doing focuses on whether Wang's notion of zhi is restricted to moral knowledge, and whether the dictum makes sense when facing the challenge of weakness of will. Frisina takes Wang's notion of... (shrink)
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  36.  96
    Metaphysics and Morality in Neo-Confucianism and Greece: Zhu XI, Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus.Kenneth Dorter - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):255-276.
    If Z hu Xi had been a western philosopher, we would say he synthesized the philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus: that he took from Plato the (...)
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  37. Zhu Xis Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (11331180) and the othergentlemen of Hunanfrom about 1167 (...)to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to understand (or construct) the meaning of taiji in terms of the polarity of yin and yang; i.e. the Supreme Polarity as the most fundamental ordering principle (li 理). (shrink)
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  38.  48
    The Archery of "Wisdom" in the Stream of Life: "Wisdom" in the "Four Books" with Zhu Xi's Reflections.Kirill O. Thompson - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):330 - 344.
    Confucian wisdom is commonly assumed to consist in the Confucian value perspective as humanism in a naturalistic outlook. In fact, Confucius and Mencius sketched out a far (...)
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  39.  86
    Ideal Interpretation: The Theories of Zhu Xi and Ronald Dworkin.A. P. & Yang Xiao - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):88-114.
    Ideal interpretation is understanding a text in the best possible way. It is usually used when the text has a canonical status, such as the Bible or (...)
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  40. Zhu Xi on Family and Women: Challenges and Potentials.Ann A. Pang‐White - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):436-455.
    This article reappraises Zhu Xi's philosophy of women. First, it examines Zhu's descriptive texts. Second, it analyzes Zhu's didactic texts on li, qi, yin, yang, (...)
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  41.  42
    Zhu Xi's Spirituality: A New Interpretation of the Great Learning.Diana Arghirescu - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):272-289.
    This essay analyzes the spiritual dimension of Zhu Xi's thought as reflected in his commentary on the four inner stages of the Great Learning (the Daxue大學 (...)》). I begin with a presentation of the notionsspirituality,” “religion,” andpractice,” and of the interpretative methods used. I then examine the signification of Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucian numinous root as embodied in the luminous moral potentiality, investigate from this perspective each one of the four inner stages of the Great Learning, and point out the main attribute of the spiritual. I conclude with a portrait of the person for whom this method of practice was intended. (shrink)
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  42.  16
    Between Poetry and Philosophy: The Neo-Confucian Hermeneutics of Zhu Xi's Nine Bends Poem.Christina Han - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (1):62-85.
    This paper examines the Neo-Confucian hermeneutic debates surrounding the interpretation of Zhu Xi's poemThe Boat Song of Wuyi's Nine Bends’. The question of whether (...)
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  43.  8
    The Archery of "Wisdom" in the Stream of Life: "Wisdom" in the Four Books with Zhu Xi's Reflections.Kirill O. Thompson - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):330-344.
    Confucian wisdom is commonly assumed to consist in the Confucian value perspective as humanism in a naturalistic outlook. In fact, Confucius and Mencius sketched out a far (...)
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  44.  24
    Tian as Cosmos in Z Hu Xis Neo-Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (2):169-185.
    Tian is central to the metaphysics, cosmology, and ethics of the 800-year-long Chinese philosophical tradition we callNeo-Confucianism,” but there is considerable confusion over (...)
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  45.  76
    Zhu Xi on Family and Women.Ann A. Pang-White - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):436-455.
    This article reappraises Zhu Xi's philosophy of women. First, it examines Zhu's descriptive texts. Second, it analyzes Zhu's didactic texts on li, qi, yin, yang, (...)
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  46.  11
    Ideal Interpretation: The Theories of Zhu Xi and Ronald Dworkin.A. Martinich & Yang Xiao - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):88-114.
    Ideal interpretation is understanding a text in the best possible way. It is usually used when the text has a canonical status, such as the Bible or (...)
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  47.  19
    Are Animals Moral?: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yakyongs Views on Nonhuman Animals.Youngsun Back - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):97-116.
    ABSTRACTOne significant feature of Jeong Yakyongs丁若鏞 thought is his deconstruction of Zhu Xis 朱熹 moral universe based on li and qi . For Zhu Xi (...), the world in its entirety was a moral place, but Jeong Yakyong distinguished nonmoral domains from the moral domain. One question that follows in pursuing a comparison of their philosophies on this topic is what each thinker meant bymoraland, in particular, whether they meant the same thing. In this paper, I delve deeper into this topic by comparing their respective perspectives on whether nonhuman animals are moral. Interestingly, they held exactly opposite views: Zhu Xi believed that certain actions on the part of nonhuman animals manifest moral values, whereas Jeong Yakyong claimed that none of the actions of nonhuman animals has moral value. In comparing their views, I introduce Mark Rowlandsdistinction betweenmoral subjectsandmoral agents.’. (shrink)
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  48.  92
    Two Dilemmas in Virtue Ethics and How Zhu Xis Neo-Confucianism Avoids Them.Yong Huang - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:247-281.
    Virtue ethics has become an important rival to deontology and consequentialism, the two dominant moral theories in modern Western philosophy. What unites various forms of virtue ethics (...)
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  49.  28
    The Ethics of Using Chapter XI as a Management Strategy.Mahmoud Salem & Opal-Dawn Martin - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2):95 - 104.
    In the past decade, the use of the Chapter XI has soared to the detriment of many creditors, workers, and consumers. A good number of cases were (...)
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  50.  19
    Influence of Interaction: A Study of Zhu Xis Reading of the Taijitu Shuo and the Tongshu.Lizhu Li - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (4):369-377.
    Zhu Xi, as a great leader of Neo-Confucianism, established the succession of the Way and raised Zhou Dunyi to the position of successor of Mencius. Zhu (...)Xi drew attention to Zhous thought and wrote a commentary on his Taijitu Shuo 太極圖說 and Tongshu 通書. During the process of annotating these two works, Zhu discussed the texts with scholars such as Li Tong, Zuqian, Zhang Shi, and Lu Jiuyuan to improve his annotation. The suggestions from other scholars affected Zhus explanation of Zhous works. This essay studies the interaction between Zhu and his friends and attempts to explain how Zhus commentaries on the Taijitu Shuo and Tongshu were affected by other scholarssuggestions. (shrink)
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