Results for 'Yusuf Do��an'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  8
    What We Believe Is Not Always What We Do: An Empirical Investigation Into Ethically Questionable Behavior in Consumption. [REVIEW]Kyoko Fukukawa & Christine Ennew - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):49 - 60.
    This article presents the results of an empirical study which argues that ethical judgment is not sufficient, by itself, to explain ethically questionable behavior in consumption. The study adopts Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior and presents results from a self-completion survey questionnaire covering five scenarios describing ethical consumer dilemmas. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess measurement structures, and the proposed model was estimated using logistic regression. Three antecedents, namely Social Norm (an extension of the construct of Subjective Norm), Perceived (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2.  82
    Do Intuitions About Frankfurt-Style Cases Rest on an Internalist Prejudice?Florian Cova & Hichem Naar - 2016 - Philosophical Explorations 19 (3):290-305.
    “Frankfurt-style cases” are widely considered as having refuted the Principle of Alternate Possibilities by presenting cases in which an agent is morally responsible even if he could not have done otherwise. However, Neil Levy has recently argued that FSCs fail because our intuitions about cases involving counterfactual interveners are inconsistent, and this inconsistency is best explained by the fact that our intuitions about such cases are grounded in an internalist prejudice about the location of mental states and capacities. In response (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  5
    Teoria do Design Inteligente: teoria científica ou discurso religioso? Apontamentos sobre uma controvérsia atual (Intelligent Design: scientific theory or religious discourse? Remarks about an actual controversy) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p709. [REVIEW]Roney Seixas Andrade & Wilmar do Valle Barbosa - 2013 - Horizonte 11 (30):709-736.
    Este artigo tem com pano de fundo a controvérsia entre criacionismo e evolucionismo que ainda captura a imaginação de amplos segmentos religiosamente orientados, sobretudo nos Estados Unidos. Aqui destacamos as proposições elaboradas pela chamada Teoria do Design Inteligente (TDI). Essa teoria, que se apresenta como científica e desprovida de qualquer compromisso religioso, propõe demonstrar empiricamente que a complexidade observada na natureza, no universo e na vida, é resultante de um design genuíno, ou seja, produto de uma inteligência organizadora, e não (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Everyone Thinks That an Ability to Do Otherwise is Necessary for Free Will and Moral Responsibility.Christopher Evan Franklin - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (8):2091-2107.
    Seemingly one of the most prominent issues that divide theorists about free will and moral responsibility concerns whether the ability to do otherwise is necessary for freedom and responsibility. I defend two claims in this paper. First, that this appearance is illusory: everyone thinks an ability to do otherwise is necessary for freedom and responsibility. The central issue is not whether the ability to do otherwise is necessary for freedom and responsibility but which abilities to do otherwise are necessary. Second, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5. What Do Philosophers of Education Do? An Empirical Study of Philosophy of Education Journals.Matthew J. Hayden - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):1-27.
    What is philosophy of education? This question has been answered in as many ways as there are those who self-identify as philosophers of education. However, the questions our field asks and the research conducted to answer them often produce papers, essays, and manuscripts that we can read, evaluate, and ponder. This paper turns to those tangible products of our scholarly activities. The titles, abstracts, and keywords from every article published from 2000 to 2010 in four journals of educational philosophy were (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  6.  7
    An Internal Morality of Nursing: What It Can and Cannot Do.Roger A. Newham - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):109-116.
    It has been claimed that there are certain acts that nurses as people practising nursing must never do because they are nurses and this is regardless of what the same agent should do; that certain actions are not part of proper nursing practice. The concept of an internal morality has been discussed in relation to medicine and has been used to ground the actions proper to medicine in a realist tradition. Although the concept of an internal morality of nursing is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  25
    Do All Subjects of a Life Have an Equal Right to Life? The Challenge of the Comparative Value of Life.Aaron Simmons - 2016 - In Mylan Engel & Gary Lynn Comstock (eds.), The Moral Rights of Animals. Lexington Books. pp. 107-117.
    In The Case for Animal Rights, Tom Regan defends the view that all animals who are “subjects of a life” have an equal moral right to life. In this chapter, I consider whether it makes sense to think that animals have an equal right to life in light of the challenge that life has less value for animals than humans. This challenge raises two central questions: (1) does life have less value for animals than humans and (2) if it does, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  57
    Do Role Models Matter? An Investigation of Role Modeling as an Antecedent of Perceived Ethical Leadership.Michael E. Brown & Linda K. Treviño - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (4):1-12.
    Thus far, we know much more about the significant outcomes of perceived ethical leadership than we do about its antecedents. In this study, we focus on multiple types of ethical role models as antecedents of perceived ethical leadership. According to social learning theory, role models facilitate the acquisition of moral and other types of behavior. Yet, we do not know whether having had ethical role models influences follower perceptions of one’s ethical leadership and, if so, what kinds of role models (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  28
    Explicit Mechanisms Do Not Account for Implicit Localization and Identification of Change: An Empirical Reply to Mitroff Et Al (2000).Diego Fernandez-Duque & Ian Thornton - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (5).
    Several recent findings support the notion that changes in the environment can be implicitly represented by the visual system. S. R. Mitroff, D. J. Simons, and S. L. Franconeri (2002) challenged this view and proposed alternative interpretations based on explicit strategies. Across 4 experiments, the current study finds no empirical support for such alternative proposals. Experiment 1 shows that subjects do not rely on unchanged items when locating an unaware change. Experiments 2 and 3 show that unaware changes affect performance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  52
    Do Animals Have an Interest in Continued Life?Aaron Simmons - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (4):375-392.
    Do we do anything wrong to animals simply by ending their lives if it causes them no pain or suffering? According to some, we can do no wrong to animals by killing them because animals do not have an interest in continued life. An attempt to ground an interest in continued life in animals’ desires faces the challenge that animals are supposedly incapable of desiring to live or of having the kinds of long-range desires which could be thwarted by death. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  28
    Do Business Students Have an Ethical Blind Spot?Greg L. Lowhorn, Lonnie D. Smith & Eric D. Bostwicky - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:83-102.
    In this study, undergraduate business students indicated the degree to which three activities were ethical or unethical, how likely they would be to commit each action, and how likely they thought the average student would be to commit each action. Significant declines in ethicality were found between comparisons of the ethical appropriateness of each scenario and the students’ personal intentions to commit the action, and between personal intention and the students’perceptions of other students’ actions. The comparison between self and others (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    What Do Ethical Guidelines for Epidemiology Say About an Ethics Review? A Qualitative Systematic Review.Jan Piasecki, Marcin Waligora & Vilius Dranseika - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (3):743-768.
    Epidemiological research is subject to an ethics review. The aim of this qualitative review is to compare existing ethical guidelines in English for epidemiological research and public health practice in regard to the scope and matter of an ethics review. Authors systematically searched PubMed, Google Scholar and Google Search for ethical guidelines. Qualitative analysis was applied to categorize important aspects of the an ethics review process. Eight ethical guidelines in English for epidemiological research were retrieved. Five main categories that are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  11
    Do Agriculturalists Need a New, an Ecocentric, Ethic? 1994 Presidential Address to the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society.Gary L. Comstock - 1995 - Agriculture and Human Values 12 (1):2-16.
    In 1973, Richard Sylvan began his seminal essay, "Do We Need a New, an Environmental Ethic?" with these words: "It is increasingly said that ... Western civilization ... stands in need of a new ethic ... setting out people's relations to the natural environment." In the intervening years, it has increasingly been said that Western civilization is in need of ecocentrism, an ethic according to which a thing's value is derived from its contribution to the integrity, stability, and beauty of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  27
    What Do Mathematicians Teach Us About the World? An Anthropological Perspective.Paul Jorion - 1999 - Philosophical Explorations.
    The activity of mathematicians is examined here in an anthropological perspective. The task effectively performed reveals that, independently of their own representation, mathematicians produce in actuality a « virtual physics ». The principles of demonstrative proof as described and assessed by Aristotle, are first introduced, displaying a latitude in the demonstrative methodology open to mathematicians, with modes of proof ranging from the compelling to the plausible only. Even such leeway in the matter of proof has been felt at times by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  20
    How Do Medical Device Manufacturers' Websites Frame the Value of Health Innovation? An Empirical Ethics Analysis of Five Canadian Innovations.P. Lehoux, M. Hivon, B. Williams-Jones, F. A. Miller & D. R. Urbach - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):61-77.
    While every health care system stakeholder would seem to be concerned with obtaining the greatest value from a given technology, there is often a disconnect in the perception of value between a technology’s promoters and those responsible for the ultimate decision as to whether or not to pay for it. Adopting an empirical ethics approach, this paper examines how five Canadian medical device manufacturers, via their websites, frame the corporate “value proposition” of their innovation and seek to respond to what (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  21
    How Do Norms Emerge? An Outline of a Theory.Karl-Dieter Opp - 2001 - Mind and Society 2 (1):101-128.
    The social science literature abounds with unconnected and, so it seems, diverse propositions about the emergence of norms. This article sets out to show that many of these propositions only differ in regard to terminology. Proponents of different theoretical orientations seem to accept a key hypothesis that is called “instrumentality proposition”: norms emerge if they are instrumental for attaining the goals of a group of actors. Apart from a problematic functionalist version the article focuses on an individualistic version: if actors (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  15
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “How to Do Research Fairly in an Unjust World”.Angela Ballantyne - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (6):4-6.
    (2010). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “How to Do Research Fairly in an Unjust World”. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 6, pp. W4-W6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  4
    Small-Sized Suppliers Entering Large Markets: An Ethical Initiative of the Caras Do Brasil Program. [REVIEW]Maria Cecilia C. De Arruda & Luiza Granado - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):685-696.
    The Pão de Açúcar Group was a pioneer in food retailing in Brazil and is now one of the largest Brazilian retailers. Working in a pulverized market characterized by small players, the Group produces US$ 20.4 billion in gross sales. It has become the largest employer in the country with 140,000 of employees working in over 1,800 stores, in 18 of the 25 states in Brazil, and covering a sales area of over 2,800,000 m2 (Grupo Pão de Açúcar, GPA Consolidado. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  5
    Do We Need an Encompassing Speed/Accuracy Trade-Off Theory?Arnold J. W. M. Thomassen & Ruud G. J. Meulenbroek - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):322-323.
    Even if we recognize that the delta-lognormal model provides an excellent fit to a large variety of data, the question remains as to what we actually learn from such a model, which could be seen as merely another multiparameter account? Do we welcome such an encompassing account, or do we expect to learn more from the limitations that become apparent when applying dedicated models addressing specific classes of movements?
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  2
    A ambivalência do simbolismo da serpente em Nm 21,4-9: uma análise na ótica dos conflitos (The ambivalence of the serpent's symbolism in Numbers 21,4-9: an analysis through the conflicts' approach). DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n25p176. [REVIEW]Vicente Artuso & Fabrizio Zandonadi Catenassi - 2012 - Horizonte 10 (25):176-200.
    A perícope das serpentes no deserto destaca-se do conjunto de escritos que recorrem ao simbolismo da serpente, ao utilizar esse elemento potencialmente enganoso para a fé de Israel, ambivalente. Diante disso, o objetivo deste trabalho foi compreender o simbolismo da serpente em Nm 21,4-9, a partir de uma análise do texto e da possível influência por parte dos egípcios e povos do Antigo Oriente Próximo. A análise narrativa destacou o texto como um enredo de conflito-solução no drama vivido pelo povo. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Do Computer Poems Show That an Author's Intention Is Irrelevant to the Meaning of a Literary Work?P. D. Juhl - 1979 - Critical Inquiry 5 (3):481-487.
    Suppose a computer prints out the following little "poem": The shooting of the hunters she heardBut to pity it moved her not. What can we say about the meaning of this "poem"? We can say that it is ambiguous. It could mean: She heard the hunters shooting at animals, people, etc., but she had no pity for the victims. . . . She heard the hunters being shot but did not pity them. . . . She heard the hunters shooting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Anxious to Do Good: Learning to Be an Economist the Hard Way.Alan Peacock - 2010 - Imprint Academic.
    After nearly three and a half -- rather too exciting -- years as a young war-time sailor, Alan Peacock expected to return to a life of quiet contemplation. Instead he became an activist economist frequently engaged in controversies about the conduct of economic policy lasting all his professional life. His earlier experiences at trying to 'do good' will resonate with all those who have attempted to influence political action, but the account is also designed to inform and entertain those who (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  92
    What Do Human Rights Do? An Anthropological Enquiry.Talal Asad - 2000 - Theory and Event 4 (4).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Do We Need an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis?Massimo Pigliucci - 2007 - Evolution 61 (12):2743-2749.
    The Modern Synthesis (MS) is the current paradigm in evolutionary biology. It was actually built by expanding on the conceptual foundations laid out by its predecessors, Darwinism and neo-Darwinism. For sometime now there has been talk of a new Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES), and this article begins to outline why we may need such an extension, and how it may come about. As philosopher Karl Popper has noticed, the current evolutionary theory is a theory of genes, and we still lack (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  25.  8
    What Groups Do, Can Do, and Know They Can Do: An Analysis in Normal Modal Logics.Jan Broersen, Andreas Herzig & Nicolas Troquard - 2009 - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 19 (3):261-289.
  26. You Do an Empirical Experiment and You Get an Empirical Result. What Can Any Anthropologist Tell Me That Could Change That?Charles Whitehead - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (10-11):7-41.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  32
    What is It Exactly That You Do? An Introduction.Brian H. Childs - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):1-4.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  12
    So You Want to Do an Online Study: Ethics Considerations and Lessons Learned.Kara Emery - 2014 - Ethics and Behavior 24 (4):293-303.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  5
    There is Nothing More I Can Do! An Introduction to the Ethics of Palliative Care.M. J. Minton - 1994 - Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):60-60.
  30.  2
    What Ought I to Do? An Inquiry Into the Nature and Kinds of Virtue and Into the Sanctions, Aims, and Values of the Moral Life.George Trumbull Ladd - 1916 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (12):332-334.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  8
    Do Researchers Have an Obligation to Actively Look for Genetic Incidental Findings?Catherine Gliwa & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):32-42.
    The rapid growth of next-generation genetic sequencing has prompted debate about the responsibilities of researchers toward genetic incidental findings. Assuming there is a duty to disclose significant incidental findings, might there be an obligation for researchers to actively look for these findings? We present an ethical framework for analyzing whether there is a positive duty to look for genetic incidental findings. Using the ancillary care framework as a guide, we identify three main criteria that must be present to give rise (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  32. Why Do Humans Reason? Arguments for an Argumentative Theory.Dan Sperber - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):57.
    Short abstract (98 words). Reasoning is generally seen as a means to improve knowledge and make better decisions. However, much evidence shows that reasoning often leads to epistemic distortions and poor decisions. This suggests that the function of reasoning should be rethought. Our hypothesis is that the function of reasoning is argumentative. It is to devise and evaluate arguments intended to persuade. Reasoning so conceived is adaptive given humans’ exceptional dependence on communication and vulnerability to misinformation. A wide range of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  33. Why Managers Fail to Do the Right Thing: An Empirical Study of Unethical and Illegal Conduct.N. Craig Smith, Sally S. Simpson & Chun-Yao Huang - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):633-667.
    We combine prior research on ethical decision-making in organizations with a rational choice theory of corporate crime from criminology to develop a model of corporate offending that is tested with a sample of U.S. managers. Despite demands for increased sanctioning of corporate offenders, we find that the threat of legal action does not directly affect the likelihood of misconduct. Managers’ evaluations of the ethics of the act, measured using a multidimensional ethics scale, have a significant effect, as do outcome expectancies (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  34.  30
    How to Do Research Fairly in an Unjust World.Angela Ballantyne - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (6):26-35.
  35. Who Am I? When Do “I” Become Another? An Analytic Exploration of Identities, Sameness and Difference, Genes and Genomes.Kristin Zeiler - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (1):25-32.
    What is the impact of genetics and genomics on issues of identity and what do we mean when we speak of identity? This paper explores how certain concepts of identity used in philosophy can be brought together in a multi-layered concept of identity. It discusses the concepts of numerical, qualitative, personal and genetic identity-over-time as well as rival concepts of genomic identity-over-time. These are all understood as layers in the multi-layered concept of identity. Furthermore, the paper makes it clear that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Do Organisms Have an Ontological Status?Charles T. Wolfe - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (2-3):195-232.
    The category of ‘organism’ has an ambiguous status: is it scientific or is it philosophical? Or, if one looks at it from within the relatively recent field or sub-field of philosophy of biology, is it a central, or at least legitimate category therein, or should it be dispensed with? In any case, it has long served as a kind of scientific “bolstering” for a philosophical train of argument which seeks to refute the “mechanistic” or “reductionist” trend, which has been perceived (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  12
    Why and How Do Journals Retract Articles? An Analysis of Medline Retractions 1988-2008.E. Wager & P. Williams - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):567-570.
    Background Journal editors are responsible for what they publish and therefore have a duty to correct the record if published work is found to be unreliable. One method for such correction is retraction of an article. Anecdotal evidence suggested a lack of consistency in journal policies and practices regarding retraction. In order to develop guidelines, we reviewed retractions in Medline to discover how and why articles were retracted. Methods We retrieved all available Medline retractions from 2005 to 2008 and a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38.  41
    Enactive Theorists Do It on Purpose: Toward an Enactive Account of Goals and Goal-Directedness. [REVIEW]Marek McGann - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):463-483.
    The enactive approach to cognitive science involves frequent references to “action” without making clear what is intended by the term. In particular, though autopoiesis is seen as a foundation for teleology in the enactive literature, no definition or account is offered of goals which can encompass not just descriptions of biological maintenance, but the range of social and cultural activities in which human beings continually engage. The present paper draws primarily on the work of Juarrero (Dynamics in action. Cambridge, MA: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  39. How Do Non-Joint Commitments Come Into Being? An Attempt at Cultural Naturalism.Ingvar Johansson - 2007 - In Nikolaos Psarros & Katinka Schulte-Ostermann (eds.), Facets of Sociality. Ontos. pp. 135--150.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Do Mountains Exist? Towards an Ontology of Landforms.Barry Smith & David Mark - 2003 - Environment and Planning B (Planning and Design) 30 (3):411–427.
    Do mountains exist? The answer to this question is surely: yes. In fact, ‘mountain’ is the example of a kind of geographic feature or thing most commonly cited by English speakers (Mark, et al., 1999; Smith and Mark 2001), and this result may hold across many languages and cultures. But whether they are considered as individuals (tokens) or as kinds (types), mountains do not exist in quite the same unequivocal sense as do such prototypical everyday objects as chairs or people.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  71
    Can One Decide to Do Something Without Forming an Intention to Do It?John McGuire - 2016 - Analysis 76 (3):269-278.
    According to the received view of practical decisions, ‘deciding to X’ is synonymous with ‘forming an intention to X’. In this article, I argue against the received view on the basis of both experimental evidence and theoretical considerations. The evidence concerns a case involving a side-effect action in which people tend to agree that an agent decided to X yet disagree that the agent had a corresponding intention to X. Additionally, I explain why one should expect decisions and intentions to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Can Simulations Be Explanatory an Why Do They Seem Not to Be?Cyrille Imbert - unknown
    Computer simulations are usually considered to be non-explanatory because, when a simulation reveals that a property is instantiated in a system, it does not enable the exact identification of what it is that brings this property out (relevance requirement). Conversely, analytical deductions are widely considered to yield explanations and understanding. In this paper, I emphasize that explanations should satisfy the relevance requirement and argue that the more they do so, the more they have explanatory value. Finally, I show that this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  24
    Brain Signals Do Not Demonstrate Unconscious Decision Making: An Interpretation Based on Graded Conscious Awareness.Jeff Miller & Wolf Schwarz - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24 (1):12-21.
    Neuroscientific studies have shown that brain activity correlated with a decision to move can be observed before a person reports being consciously aware of having made that decision . Given that a later event cannot cause an earlier one , such results have been interpreted as evidence that decisions are made unconsciously . We argue that this interpretation depends upon an all-or-none view of consciousness, and we offer an alternative interpretation of the early decision-related brain activity based on models in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  59
    An Analysis of Corporate Ethical Code Studies: “Where Do We Go From Here?”. [REVIEW]Betsy Stevens - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (1):63 - 69.
    The dramatic increase in the number of corporate ethical codes over the past 20 years has been attributed to the Watergate scandal and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Ethical codes differ somewhat from profesional codes and mission statements; yet the terms are frequently interchanged and often confused in the literature. Ethical code studies are reviewed in terms of how codes are communicated to employees and whether implications for violating codes are discussed. Most studies use content analysis to determine subjects in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   55 citations  
  45.  31
    Do Markets Crowd Out Virtues? An Aristotelian Framework.J. J. Graafland - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):1-19.
    The debate on the influence of markets on virtues has focused on two opposite hypotheses: the doux commerce thesis and the self-destruction thesis. Whereas the doux commerce hypothesis assumes that capitalism polishes human manners, the self-destruction hypothesis holds that capitalism erodes the moral foundation of society. This paper will develop a more balanced position by using the virtue ethics developed by Aristotle, which distinguishes several virtues. The research will focus on the question for which virtues the doux commerce or self-destruction (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  46.  30
    How Do Children Restrict Their Linguistic Generalizations? An (Un‐)Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):508-543.
    A paradox at the heart of language acquisition research is that, to achieve adult-like competence, children must acquire the ability to generalize verbs into non-attested structures, while avoiding utterances that are deemed ungrammatical by native speakers. For example, children must learn that, to denote the reversal of an action, un- can be added to many verbs, but not all (e.g., roll/unroll; close/*unclose). This study compared theoretical accounts of how this is done. Children aged 5–6 (N = 18), 9–10 (N = (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47. Do We Have an Obligation to Make Smarter Babies?Lisa Bortolotti - 2009 - In T. Takala, P. Herrisone-Kelly & S. Holm (eds.), Cutting Through the Surface. Philosophical Approaches to Bioethics. Rodopi.
    In this paper I consider some issues concerning cognitive enhancements and the ethics of enhancing in reproduction and parenting. I argue that there are moral reasons to enhance the cognitive capacities of the children one has, or of the children one is going to have, and that these enhancements should not be seen as an alternative to pursuing important changes in society that might also improve one’s own and one’s children’s life. It has been argued that an emphasis on enhancing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. What Do We Know About Tax Fraud? An Overview of Recent Developments.Benno Torgler - 2008 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (4):1239-1270.
    This paper explores recent tendencies in the area of tax fraud. The paper stresses the importance of social norms and institutions and highlights the relevance of extending the standard theories of tax fraud which is based on a narrow deterrence concept. The paper also refers to underexplored topics that require further investigation such as the relevance of rewards, social interactions, and tax complexity stressing also the importance of moving more strongly into business tax fraud, exploring also the interactions within a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  45
    Do Desires Provide Reasons? An Argument Against the Cognitivist Strategy.Avery Archer - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (8):2011-2027.
    According to the cognitivist strategy, the desire to bring about P provides reasons for intending to bring about P in a way analogous to how perceiving that P provides reasons for believing that P. However, while perceiving P provides reasons for believing P by representing P as true, desiring to bring about P provides reasons for intending to bring about P by representing P as good. This paper offers an argument against this view. My argument proceeds via an appeal to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    Do Online Exams Facilitate Cheating? An Experiment Designed to Separate Possible Cheating From the Effect of the Online Test Taking Environment.Alan Fask, Fred Englander & Zhaobo Wang - 2014 - Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (2):101-112.
    Despite recent growth in distance education, there has been relatively little research on whether online examinations facilitate student cheating. The present paper utilizes an experimental design to assess the difference in student performance between students taking a traditional, proctored exam and those taking an online, unproctored exam. This difference in performance is examined in a manner which considers both the effect of the different physical test environments and the possible effect of a difference in the opportunity for students to cheat. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000