Results for 'Z. Elgin Samuel'

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  1. Catherine Z. Elgin.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1998 - In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. pp. 26.
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  2.  22
    Merely Partial Definition and the Analysis of Knowledge.Samuel Z. Elgin - forthcoming - Synthese:1-25.
    Two families of positions dominate debates over a metaphysically reductive analysis of knowledge. Traditionalism holds that knowledge has a complete, uniquely identifying analysis, while knowledge-first epistemology contends that knowledge is primitive—admitting of no reductive analysis whatsoever. Drawing on recent work in metaphysics, I argue that these alternatives fail to exhaust the available possibilities. Knowledge may have a merely partial analysis: a real definition that distinguishes it from some, but not all other things. I demonstrate that this position is attractive; it (...)
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  3.  31
    Between the Absolute and the Arbitrary.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1997 - Cornell University Press.
    In Between the Absolute and the Arbitrary, Catherine Z. Elgin maps a constructivist alternative to the standard Anglo-American conception of philosophy's ...
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  4.  84
    Interpretation and Identity: Can the Work Survive the World?Nelson Goodman & Catherine Z. Elgin - 1986 - Critical Inquiry 12 (3):564-575.
    Predictions concerning the end of the world have proven less reliable than your broker’s recommendations or your fondest hopes. Whether you await the end fearfully or eagerly, you may rest assured that it will never come—not because the world is everlasting but because it has already ended, if indeed it ever began. But we need not mourn, for the world is indeed well lost, and with it the stultifying stereotypes of absolutism: the absurd notions of science as the effort to (...)
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  5.  22
    Considered Judgement.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2000 - Mind 109 (434):334-337.
    Philosophy long sought to set knowledge on a firm foundation, through derivation of indubitable truths by infallible rules. For want of such truths and rules, the enterprise foundered. Nevertheless, foundationalism's heirs continue their forbears' quest, seeking security against epistemic misfortune, while their detractors typically espouse unbridled coherentism or facile relativism. Maintaining that neither stance is tenable, Catherine Elgin devises a via media between the absolute and the arbitrary, reconceiving the nature, goals, and methods of epistemology. In Considered Judgment, she (...)
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  6. With Reference to Reference.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1983 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    "Systematizes and develops in a comprehensive study Nelson Goodman's philosophy of language. The Goodman-Elgin point of view is important and sophisticated, and deals with a number of issues, such as metaphor, ignored by most other theories." --John R. Perry, Stanford University.
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  7. The Semantic Foundations of Philosophical Analysis.Samuel Elgin - manuscript
    I provide an analysis of sentences of the form ‘To be F is to be G’ in terms of exact truth-maker semantics—an approach that identifies the meanings of sentences with the states of the world directly responsible for their truth-values. Roughly, I argue that these sentences hold just in case that which makes something F is that which makes it G. This approach is hyperintensional, and possesses desirable logical and modal features. These sentences are reflexive, transitive and symmetric, and, if (...)
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  8.  85
    The Epistemology of Identity.Samuel Elgin - manuscript
    The subject of this paper is the epistemology of identity: a general theory of knowledge, evidence and justification for the claim that one thing is identical to another. Although identity figures significantly in our epistemic lives, this is a topic that, to the best of my knowledge, has gone entirely unexplored. Initial attempts to integrate such an epistemology into existing theories of evidence---many of which are tailor-made for contingent propositions---are confounded by the necessity of identity. I defend a restricted form (...)
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  9.  71
    The Opacity of Definition.Samuel Elgin - manuscript
    This paper is concerned with logical attributes of (real) definition. In particular, I argue that substitution principles give rise to reflexive definitions: cases in which something is directly and exclusively defined in terms of itself. Many maintain that definition is both substitutable and irreflexive, so these standard commitments are at odds. As a corollary, I demonstrate that the claims in ‘Real Definition’ Rosen (2015) are logically inconsistent. I close with a brief discussion of the implications this has for the opacity (...)
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  10.  53
    Knowledge is Closed Under Analytic Content.Samuel Elgin - manuscript
    I defend a version of the closure principle in terms of analyticity: if an agent S knows that p, and if q is an analytic part of p, then S knows that q. I distinguish this view from other versions of closure, present novel necessary and sufficient conditions for knowledge and close by arguing that contextualists are tacitly committed to this formulation of closure.
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  11.  69
    There Are No Metaphysical Primitives.Samuel Elgin - manuscript
    Many metaphysicians posit primitives. These vary with respect to the theoretical work that they perform, but are all undefinable in more basic terms. I argue against the existence of metaphysical primitives on the grounds that, if they existed, they would be essentially primitive. However, if primitives were essentially primitive, then they would have an essence. Because they are primitive, they lack an essence, which undermines the original supposition that they are primitive. I close by mentioning some implications this has both (...)
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  12.  56
    Physicalism and the Identity of Identity Theories.Samuel Elgin - manuscript
    Type-identity theorists interpret physicalism as the claim that every property is identical to a physical property. Token-identity theorists interpret it as the claim that every particular is identical to a physical particular. The end of this paper is to undermine the distinction between the two. Drawing on recent work on generalized identities and truth-maker semantics, I demonstrate that these formulations of physicalism are logically equivalent. I then argue that each formulation has the resources to resolve problems that the other encounters.
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  13.  24
    The Unreliability of Foreseeable Consequences: A Return to the Epistemic Objection.Samuel Elgin - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (4):759-766.
    Consequentialists maintain that an act is morally right just in case it produces the best consequences of any available alternative. Because agents are ignorant about some of their acts’ consequences, they cannot be certain about which alternative is best. Kagan contends that it is reasonable to assume that unforeseen good and bad consequences roughly balance out and can be largely disregarded. A statistical argument demonstrates that Kagan’s assumption is almost always false. An act’s foreseeable consequences are an extremely poor indicator (...)
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  14. Shottenkirk, Dena. Nominalism And Its Aftermath : The Philosophy Of Nelson Goodman. [REVIEW]Samuel Elgin - 2012 - Enrahonar:155-159.
     
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  15. True Enough.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2004 - Philosophical Issues 14 (1):113–131.
    Truth is standardly considered a requirement on epistemic acceptability. But science and philosophy deploy models, idealizations and thought experiments that prescind from truth to achieve other cognitive ends. I argue that such felicitous falsehoods function as cognitively useful fictions. They are cognitively useful because they exemplify and afford epistemic access to features they share with the relevant facts. They are falsehoods in that they diverge from the facts. Nonetheless, they are true enough to serve their epistemic purposes. Theories that contain (...)
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  16.  88
    ``Is Understanding Factive?".Catherine Z. Elgin - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 322--30.
  17. Emotion and Understanding.C. Z. Elgin - 2008 - In G. Brun, U. Dogluoglu & D. Kuenzle (eds.), Epistemology and Emotions.
  18. Persistent Disagreement.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2010 - In Richard Feldman & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Disagreement. Oxford University Press.
     
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  19. From Knowledge to Understanding.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2006 - In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Oxford University Press. pp. 199--215.
     
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  20. Fiction as Thought Experiment.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2014 - Perspectives on Science 22 (2):221-241.
    Jonathan Bennett (1974) maintains that Huckleberry Finn’s deliberations about whether to return Jim to slavery afford insight into the tension between sympathy and moral judgment; Miranda Fricker (2007) argues that the trial scene in To Kill a Mockingbird affords insight into the nature of testimonial injustice. Neither claims merely that the works prompt an attentive reader to think something new or to change her mind. Rather, they consider the reader cognitively better off for her encounters with the novels. Nor is (...)
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  21. Understanding: Art and Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1993 - Synthese 95 (1):13-28.
    The arts and the sciences perform many of the same cognitive functions, both serving to advance understanding. This paper explores some of the ways exemplification operates in the two fields. Both scientific experiments and works of art highlight, underscore, display, or convey some of their own features. They thereby focus attention on them, and make them available for examination and projection. Thus, the Michelson-Morley experiment exemplifies the constancy of the speed of light. Jackson Pollock's "Number One" exemplifies the viscosity of (...)
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  22. Keeping Things in Perspective. [REVIEW]Catherine Z. Elgin - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 150 (3):439 - 447.
    Scientific realism holds that scientific representations are utterly objective. They describe the way the world is, independent of any point of view. In Scientific Representation, van Fraassen argues otherwise. If science is to afford an understanding of nature, it must be grounded in evidence. Since evidence is perspectivai, science cannot vindicate its claims using only utterly objective representations. For science to do its epistemic job, it must involve perspectivai representations. I explicate this argument and show its power.
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  23.  7
    Considered Judgment.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2000 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):724-726.
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  24. Trustworthiness.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2008 - Philosophical Papers 37 (3):371-387.
    I argue that trustworthiness is an epistemic desideratum. It does not reduce to justified or reliable true belief, but figures in the reason why justified or reliable true beliefs are often valuable. Such beliefs can be precarious. If a belief's being justified requires that the evidence be just as we take it to be, then if we are off even by a little, the belief is unwarranted. Similarly for reliability. Although it satisfies the definition of knowledge, such a belief is (...)
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  25. Art in the Advancement of Understanding.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2002 - American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):1 - 12.
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  26. Construction and Cognition.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2009 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 24 (2):135-146.
    _The Structure of Appearance_ presents a phenomenalist system which constructs enduring visible objects out of qualia. Nevertheless Goodman does not espouse phenomenalism. Why not? In answering this question this paper explicates Goodman’s views about the nature and functions of constructional systems, the prospects of reductionism, and the character of epistemology.
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  27.  56
    Making Manifest: The Role of Exemplification in the Sciences and the Arts.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2011 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 15 (3):399-413.
    Exemplification is the relation of an example to whatever it is an example of. Goodman maintains that exemplification is a symptom of the aesthetic: although not a necessary condition, it is an indicator that symbol is functioning aesthetically. I argue that exemplification is as important in science as it is in art. It is the vehicle by which experiments make aspects of nature manifest. I suggest that the difference between exemplars in the arts and the sciences lies in the way (...)
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  28. The Epistemic Efficacy of Stupidity.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1988 - Synthese 74 (3):297 - 311.
    I show that it follows from both externalist and internalist theories that stupid people may be in a better position to know than smart ones. This untoward consequence results from taking our epistemic goal to be accepting as many truths as possible and rejecting as many falsehoods as possible, combined with a recognition that the standard for acceptability cannot be set too high, else scepticism will prevail. After showing how causal, reliabilist, and coherentist theories devalue intelligence, I suggest that knowledge, (...)
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  29. Take It From Me: The Epistemological Status of Testimony.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):291-308.
    Testimony consists in imparting information without supplying evidence or argument to back one's claims. To what extent does testimony convey epistemic warrant? C. J. A. Coady argues, on Davidsonian grounds, that (1) most testimony is true, hence (2) most testimony supplies warrant sufficient for knowledge. I appeal to Grice's maxims to undermine Coady's argument and to show that the matter is more complicated and context-sensitive than is standardly recognized. Informative exchanges take place within networks of shared, tacit assumptions that affect (...)
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  30. Epistemology's Ends, Pedagogy's Prospects'.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1999 - Facta Philosophica 1:39-54.
     
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  31. Unnatural Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (6):289-302.
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  32.  16
    With Reference to Reference.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (4):448-451.
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  33.  25
    D. M. Armstrong. A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility. Cambridge Studies in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Etc. 1989, Xiii + 156 Pp. - Brian Skyrms. Tractarian Nominalism. Therein, Pp. 145–152. , Pp. 199–206.). [REVIEW]Catherine Z. Elgin - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (1):352-355.
  34.  12
    Reconceptions in Philosophy and Other Arts and Sciences.Nelson Goodman & Catherine Z. Elgin - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (12):711-716.
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  35.  8
    Reconceptions in Philosophy and Other Arts and Sciences.Nelson Goodman & Catherine Z. Elgin - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):710-713.
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  36. "The Legacy of" Two Dogmas".Catherine Z. Elgin - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):267.
    W. V. Quine is famous, or perhaps infamous, for his repudiation of the analytic/synthetic distinction and kindred dualisms—the necessary/contingent dichotomy and the a priori/a posteriori dichotomy. As these dualisms have come back into vogue in recent years, it might seem that the denial of the dualisms is no part of Quine's enduring legacy. Such a conclusion is unwarranted—not only because the dualisms are deeply problematic, but because "Two Dogmas of Empiricism" haunts even those who want to retain them. "Two Dogmas" (...)
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  37.  22
    Unnatural Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (6):289.
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  38. With Reference to Reference.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1983 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 42 (2):336-340.
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  39. The Legacy of Nelson Goodman.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):679-690.
    Nelson Goodman was one of the soaring figures of twentieth century philosophy. His work radically reshaped the subject, forcing fundamental reconceptions of philosophy’s problems, ends, and means. Goodman not only contributed to diverse fields, from philosophy of language to aesthetics, from philosophy of science to mereology, his works cut across these and other fields, revealing shared features and connecting links that narrowly focused philosophers overlook. That the author of The Structure of Appearance also wrote Languages of Art is not in (...)
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  40.  70
    Education and the Advancement of Understanding.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1999 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:131-140.
    Understanding, as I construe it, is holistic. It is a matter of how commitments mesh to form a mutually supportive, independently supported system of thought. It is advanced by bootstrapping. We start with what we think we know and build from there. This makes education continuous with what goes on at the cutting edge of inquiry. Methods, standards, categories and stances are as important as facts. So something like E. D. Hirsch’s list of facts every fourth grader should know is (...)
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  41. 13 Skepticism Aside.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2010 - In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.), Knowledge and Skepticism. MIT Press. pp. 309.
     
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  42.  10
    Williams on Truthfulness.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):343-352.
    Truth and Truthfulness: an Essay in Genealogy. By Bernard Williams.
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  43.  8
    Take If From Me: The Epistemological Status of Testimony.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):291-308.
    Testimony consists in imparting information without supplying evidence or argument to back one's claims. To what extent does testimony convey epistemic warrant? C. J. A. Coady argues, on Davidsonian grounds, that most testimony is true, hence most testimony supplies warrant sufficient for knowledge. I appeal to Grice's maxims to undermine Coady's argument and to show that the matter is more complicated and context‐sensitive than is standardly rocognized. Informative exchanges take place within networks of shared, tacit assumptions that affect the scope (...)
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  44.  4
    Understanding: Art and Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1991 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):196-208.
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  45.  46
    Begging to Differ.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):77-82.
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  46.  91
    Creation as Reconfiguration: Art in the Advancement of Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):13 – 25.
    Cognitive advancement is not always a matter of acquiring new information. It often consists in reconfiguration--in reorganizing a domain so that hitherto overlooked or underemphasized features, patterns, opportunities, and resources come to light. Several modes of reconfiguration prominent in the arts--metaphor, fiction, exemplification, and perspective--play important roles in science as well. They do not perform the same roles as literal, descriptive, perspectiveless scientific truths. But to understand how science advances understanding, we need to appreciate the ineliminable cognitive contributions of non-literal, (...)
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  47.  53
    Worldmaker: Nelson Goodman.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2000 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 31 (1):1-18.
  48.  15
    Richard Foley’s Intellectual Trust in Oneself and Others.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):724-734.
    Descartes’ demon is a crafty little devil. Despite centuries of effort by exceedingly clever thinkers, he continues to elude our clutches. Skepticism endures. The reason, Richard Foley thinks, is not hard to discover. It is simply impossible to break through the Cartesian circle. Our only means of vindicating a claim to knowledge or rational belief is to show that it is produced or sustained by our best epistemic methods, that it satisfies the best standards we can devise for rational belief. (...)
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  49.  9
    Begging to Differ.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 59:77-82.
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  50.  17
    Williams on Truthfulness.ByCatherine Z. Elgin - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):343–352.
    "Williams on Truthfulness" is a review of Bernard Williams's Truth and Truthfulness. It argues that Williams explicates truthfulness as a thick concept that depends on but diverges from a mere propensity to utter truths. Besides conveying an understanding of the complex virtue of truthfulness, it thus shows why thick concepts are not simply descriptive concepts overlaid with expressive glosses.
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