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  1.  11
    "Expel the Barbarian From Your Heart": Intimations of the Cyclops in Euripides's Hecuba.Zdravko Planinc - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):403-415.
    In memoriam: Mira Balija PlanincEuripides's Hecuba is not one of the best-known tragedies. The story is vividly memorable, however. Troy has fallen. The Greeks have finished their killing and plundering and have begun their homeward journey. As soon as they cross the Hellespont and make camp on what some might call the European side, in Thrace, they bury Achilles. The Trojan queen, Hecuba, is enslaved, as are the only two of her daughters who remain alive, Polyxena and Cassandra, the latter (...)
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  2. Plato's Invisible Cities: Discourse and Power in the Republic.Adi Ophir & Zdravko Planinc - 1994 - Utopian Studies 5 (1):209-211.
  3.  5
    Colloquium 5 Socrates and the Cyclops: Plato’s Critique of ‘Platonism’ in the Sophist and Statesman.Zdravko Planinc - 2016 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):159-217.
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  4. Politics, Religion, and Love'S Transgression: The Political Philosophy of Romeo and Juliet.Zdravko Planinc - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):11-37.
    In Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare examines the relationship of the political realm to the things that are outside or beyond politics: family, society, religion, friendship, and love. The play is thus a work of political philosophy, and no less so because it is a work of art in which these things are portrayed concretely through the relationships of the play's characters. The difficulties of interpreting the play are due in part to its aesthetic particularity, but more to the familiarity (...)
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