Results for 'absolute standpoint'

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  1.  37
    Religion and the Absolute Standpoint.Joseph C. Flay - 1981 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 56 (3):316-327.
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  2.  41
    Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part II: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint.Ardis B. Collins - 1985 - The Owl of Minerva 16 (2):215-221.
    Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part II, which begins with the section on spirit, completes a study begun in an earlier publication, Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part I. The study is divided into analysis and commentary, and these run parallel to each other. The commentary takes the form of notes separated from the main text. These notes identify historical, literary, religious, and philosophical influences, compare the issues Hegel is dealing with to similar issues identified by other philosophers, give cross references to other parts of the (...)
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  3.  11
    Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part II: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint[REVIEW]Ardis B. Collins - 1985 - The Owl of Minerva 16 (2):215-221.
    Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part II, which begins with the section on spirit, completes a study begun in an earlier publication, Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part I. The study is divided into analysis and commentary, and these run parallel to each other. The commentary takes the form of notes separated from the main text. These notes identify historical, literary, religious, and philosophical influences, compare the issues Hegel is dealing with to similar issues identified by other philosophers, give cross references to other parts of the (...)
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  4.  5
    Hegel's Phenomenology, Part II: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint[REVIEW]Quentin Lauer - 1984 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (2):394-394.
    Following on part 1 of Howard Kainz's analysis and commentary of Hegel's Phenomenology, published in 1976, the present volume contains what the author calls an "exegesis and interpretation" of chapters 6 to 8. It should be noted that the division of the commentary into two parts is in no way intended to indicate any radical division in Hegel's text. A more significant division within Kainz's text is that between the interpretation, which is original, free, sometimes even fanciful, and the commentary (...)
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  5.  8
    Hegel's Phenomenology, Part I: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint. By Howard P. Kainz.Edward Vacek - 1986 - Modern Schoolman 63 (2):155-156.
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  6. Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part II: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint.Howard P. Kainz - 1983 - Ohio University Press.
  7.  15
    On the Epistemic Status of Absolute Space: Kant’s Directions in Space Read From the Standpoint of His Critical Period.Patricia Kauark-Leite - 2017 - Kant-Studien 108 (2):175-194.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 108 Heft: 2 Seiten: 175-194.
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  8. The Attainment of the Absolute in Hegel's Phenomenology.Mitchell Miller - 1998 - In Jon Stewart (ed.), The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: A Collection of Critical and Interpretive Essays. State University of New York Press. pp. 427-443.
    A close reading of the final chapter of Hegel's Phenomenology, with special attention to phenomenological method, to the structure of overcomings and preservations that makes for the integrated totality of the ascent to the absolute, to the determinate negations that bind ch.s 6c on Objective Spirit and 7c on Revealed Religion to one another and to ch. 8 on Absolute Spirit, and to the relations of the absolute standpoint to time and to history.
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  9. The Attainment of the Absolute in Hegel’s Phenomenolog Y.Mitchell Miller - 1978 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 7 (2):195-219.
    A close reading of the final chapter of Hegel's Phenomenology, with special attention to dialectical method, to the relation of ch.s 6c on Objective Spirit and 7c on Revealed Religion to ch. 8 on Absolute Spirit, and to the relations of the absolute standpoint to time and to history.
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  10.  75
    Winch and Wittgenstein on Moral Harm and Absolute Safety.Mikel Burley - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (2):81 - 94.
    This paper examines Wittgenstein's conception of absolute safety in the light of two potential problems exposed by Winch. These are that, firstly: even if someone's life has been virtuous so far, the contingency of its remaining so until death vitiates the claim that the virtuous person cannot be harmed; and secondly: when voiced from a first-person standpoint, the claim to be absolutely safe due to one's virtuousness appears hubristic and self-undermining. I argue that Wittgenstein's mystical conception of safety, (...)
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  11.  62
    Hegel's Ladder: The Ethical Presuppositions of Absolute Knowing.J. M. Bernstein - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):803-818.
    The goal of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit is to achieve absolute knowing. Minimally, knowing can be absolute only if it is unconditioned or unlimited; that is, only if it is not essentially contrasted with some other possible knowing—say, God's—or is not restricted such that it necessarily does not pertain to certain items—say, freedom of the will, the immortality of the soul, or God. Knowing can be absolute only if these items, appropriately interpreted, are within its scope. However, (...)
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  12.  19
    Nishida Kitarōs Philosophy of Absolute Nothingness and Modern Theoretical Physics.Agnieszka Kozyra - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (2):423-446.
    Nishida Kitarō1, the founder of the Kyoto school of philosophy, often stated that his philosophy of Absolute Nothingness, which had in part been inspired by Zen Buddhism, was not a kind of mysticism. In his last unfinished essay, Watakushi no ronri ni tsuite he complained that his logic of absolutely contradictory self-identity had not been understood by the academic world, and its meaning had been distorted. Nishida decided that the only way of clarifying his philosophical standpoint was to (...)
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  13.  37
    Absolute Skepticism, Lao Zi and Krishnamurti.Jay G. Williams - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 51:23-29.
    Ordinary skepticism is based upon some form of certainty. One may be skeptical about the claims of religion because one accepts the certainties of science or some philosophical argument. One may be skeptical about a certain investment strategy because one believes in various proven economic principles. Absoluteskepticism, on the other hand, has no such certainty upon which to rely. Every standpoint, including absolute skepticism itself, is open to doubt. Thus absolute skepticism is not another philosophical position but (...)
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  14.  39
    Philosophy and the Absolute.Thomas J. Bole - 1986 - Review of Metaphysics 40 (2):390-392.
    This book examines Hegel's presentation of the absolute as knowing and as spirit. McRae construes this absolute both metaphysically, as a self-sufficient existent, the conceptual articulation of which explains the essence and existence of reality, and as truth-oriented, as the conceptual integration of thought and being. He is not, however, aware of the distinction between these construals. He contends that Hegel fails to show that the theoretically inquisitive reader should accept the standpoint of the absolute, because (...)
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  15. Hegel, Harding, and Objectivity.Christine James - 1998 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):111-122.
    Jean Hyppolite describes Hegel’s project in the Phenomenology of Spirit as “the development and formulation of natural consciousness and its progression to science, that is to say, to philosophic knowledge, to knowledge of the absolute” (Hyppolite 1974, 4). This development or progression is the “work of consciousness engaged in experience,” as phenomenal knowledge necessarily leads to absolute knowledge. Thus from the very nature of consciousness one is led toward the absolute, which is both substance as well as (...)
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  16.  25
    Vida, naturaleza, y nihilismo afectivo en Fichte.Vicente Serrano - 2013 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 30 (1):91-106.
    This paper considers Fichte’s philosophy from the standpoint of the concept of nihilism: I contend that Fichte subordinates the emotional life to the moral imperative. After leaving Jena, Fichte would have tried to answer Jacobi’s objections, making the concept of life his central philosophical concern. This attempt at reconciling the primacy of the moral imperative and a relevant concept of life (in response to Jacobi) would allow us to understand Fichte’s philosophy in the Berlin period and, in particular, his (...)
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  17.  8
    The Transcendence of Time in the Epistemology of Observation From a Phenomenological Standpoint.Stathis Livadas - 2011 - Manuscrito 34 (2):435-468.
    In this article I deal with time as a notion of epistemological content associated though with the notion of a subjective consciousness co-constitutive of physical reality. In this phenomenologically grounded approach I attempt to establish a ‘metaphysical’ aspect of time, within a strictly pistemological context, in the sense of an underlying absolute subjectivity which is non-objectifiable within objective temporality and thus non-susceptible of any ontological designation. My arguments stem, on the one hand, from a version of quantum-mechanical theory in (...)
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  18.  15
    Charter of Christendom: The Significance of the "City of God".R. C. N. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (1):167-167.
    A well-documented defense of the thesis that St. Augustine held the city of man, especially Rome, to contain many relative goods, however evil it was from the absolute standpoint of goodness consisting in the worship of the true God. O'Meara discusses in some detail many contemporary critics, e.g., Ernest Barker, who oppose this interpretation, and argues on the basis of historical circumstance and Augustine's own declarations in works other than the City of God.--R. C. N.
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  19.  8
    Charter of Christendom: The Significance of the "City of God". [REVIEW]C. N. R. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (1):167-167.
    A well-documented defense of the thesis that St. Augustine held the city of man, especially Rome, to contain many relative goods, however evil it was from the absolute standpoint of goodness consisting in the worship of the true God. O'Meara discusses in some detail many contemporary critics, e.g., Ernest Barker, who oppose this interpretation, and argues on the basis of historical circumstance and Augustine's own declarations in works other than the City of God.--R. C. N.
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  20.  9
    Dialektik der Zeit: Untersuchungen Zu Hegels Metaphysik der Weltgeschichte.John Burbidge - 1984 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (3):615-616.
    For Hegel, the philosophy of world history marks the culmination of the philosophy of right and introduces the philosophy of absolute spirit. As the juncture between time and eternity, it raises the critical question about his project. Either history is taken seriously and time condemns all achievements, whether political, aesthetic, religious or philosophical, to the finitude of contingency. Or the absolute standpoint, once attained, cuts the flow of time, cancelling the reality of its continuation.
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  21. Metaphysical and Absolute Possibility.Justin Clarke-Doane - forthcoming - Synthese (special issue):1-12.
    It is widely alleged that metaphysical possibility is “absolute” possibility (Kripke [1980], Lewis [1986], Rosen [2006, 16], Stalnaker [2005, 203], Williamson [2016, 460]). Indeed, this is arguably its metaphysical significance. Kripke calls metaphysical necessity “necessity in the highest degree” ([1980, 99]). Williamson calls metaphysical possibility the “maximal objective modality” [2016, 459]. Rosen says that “metaphysical possibility is the [most inclusive] sort of real possibility” ([2006, 16]). And Stalnaker writes, “we can agree with Frank Jackson, David Chalmers, Saul Kripke, David (...)
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  22. Why Standpoint Matters.Alison Wylie - 2003 - In Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge. pp. 26--48.
    Feminist standpoint theory has been marginal to mainstream philosophical analyses of science–indeed, it has been marginal to science studies generally–and it has had an uneasy reception among feminist theorists. Critics of standpoint theory have attributed to it untenable foundationalist assumptions about the social identities that can underpin an epistemically salient standpoint, and implausible claims about the epistemic privilege that should be accorded to those who occupy subdominant social locations. I disentangle what I take to be the promising (...)
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  23. From Standpoint Epistemology to Epistemic Oppression.Briana Toole - forthcoming - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy.
    Standpoint epistemology is committed to a cluster of views that pay special attention to the role of social identity in knowledge acquisition. Of particular interest here is the situated knowledge thesis. This thesis holds that for certain propositions p, whether an epistemic agent is in a position to know that p depends on some non-epistemic facts related to the epistemic agent’s social identity. In this paper, I examine two possible ways to interpret this thesis. My first goal here is (...)
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  24.  46
    A Moral Argument Against Absolute Authority of the Torah.Dan Baras - forthcoming - Sophia:1-23.
    In this article, I will argue against the Orthodox Jewish view that the Torah should be treated as an absolute authority. I begin with an explanation of what it means to treat something as an absolute authority. I then review examples of norms in the Torah that seem clearly immoral. Next, I explore reasons that people may have for accepting a person, text, or tradition as an absolute authority in general. I argue that none of these reasons (...)
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  25.  42
    Epistemic Paternalism, Epistemic Permissivism, and Standpoint Epistemology.Elizabeth Jackson - 2020 - In Amiel Bernal & Guy Axtell (eds.), Epistemic Paternalism Reconsidered: Conceptions, Justifications, and Implications. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
    Epistemic paternalism is the practice of interfering with someone’s inquiry, without their consent, for their own epistemic good. In this chapter, I explore the relationship between epistemic paternalism and two other epistemological theses: epistemic permissivism and standpoint epistemology. I argue that examining this relationship is fruitful because it sheds light on a series of cases in which epistemic paternalism is unjustified and brings out notable similarities between epistemic permissivism and standpoint epistemology.
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  26. Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters.Alison Wylie - 2012 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophy Association 86 (2):47-76.
    Standpoint theory is an explicitly political as well as social epistemology. Its central insight is that epistemic advantage may accrue to those who are oppressed by structures of domination and discounted as knowers. Feminist standpoint theorists hold that gender is one dimension of social differentiation that can make such a difference. In response to two longstanding objections I argue that epistemically consequential standpoints need not be conceptualized in essentialist terms, and that they do not confer automatic or comprehensive (...)
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  27. Standpoint Theory, in Science.Alison Wylie & Sergio Sismondo - 2015 - In James D. Wright (ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition). Elsevier. pp. 324-330.
    Standpoint theory is based on the insight that those who are marginalized or oppressed have distinctive epistemic resources with which to understand social structures. Inasmuch as these structures shape our understanding of the natural and lifeworlds, standpoint theorists extend this principle to a range of biological and physical as well as social sciences. Standpoint theory has been articulated as a social epistemology and as an aligned methodological stance. It provides the rationale for ‘starting research from the margins’ (...)
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  28. On the Concept of Creal: The Politico-Ethical Horizon of a Creative Absolute.Luis De Miranda - 2017 - In The Dark Precursor: Deleuze and Artistic Research. Leuven University Press. pp. 510-516.
    Process philosophies tend to emphasise the value of continuous creation as the core of their discourse. For Bergson, Whitehead, Deleuze, and others the real is ultimately a creative becoming. Critics have argued that there is an irreducible element of (almost religious) belief in this re-evaluation of immanent creation. While I don’t think belief is necessarily a sign of philosophical and existential weakness, in this paper I will examine the possibility for the concept of universal creation to be a political and (...)
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  29. Feminist Philosophy of Science: ‘Standpoint’ and Knowledge.Sharon Crasnow - 2008 - Science & Education 17 (10):1089-1110.
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a better understanding (...)
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  30. Absolute Actuality and the Plurality of Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2006 - Philosophical Perspectives 20 (1):41–76.
    According to David Lewis, a realist about possible worlds must hold that actuality is relative: the worlds are ontologically all on a par; the actual and the merely possible differ, not absolutely, but in how they relate to us. Call this 'Lewisian realism'. The alternative, 'Leibnizian realism', holds that actuality is an absolute property that marks a distinction in ontological status. Lewis presents two arguments against Leibnizian realism. First, he argues that the Leibnizian realist cannot account for the contingency (...)
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  31. Pro‐Tanto Versus Absolute Rights.Danny Frederick - 2014 - Philosophical Forum 45 (4):375-394.
    Judith Jarvis Thomson and others contend that rights are pro-tanto rather than absolute, that is, that rights may permissibly be infringed in some circumstances. Alan Gewirth maintains that there are some rights that are absolute because infringing them would amount to unspeakable evil. However, there seem to be possible circumstances in which it would be permissible to infringe even those rights. Specificationists, such as Gerald Gaus, Russ Shafer-Landau, Hillel Steiner and Kit Wellman, argue that all rights are (...) because they have implicit exceptions, the exceptions being either right-voiding or right-compatible. Specificationists have charged pro-tantoism with preventing rights from being action-guiding, and pro-tantoists have levelled the same charge against specificationism. I show that both charges are mistaken. Pro-tantoists claim that specificationists cannot account for the moral remainder that we recognise in some circumstances and which can be explained by reference to a permissible right-infringement. Specificationists retort that the moral remainder can be explained by invoking compensation-rights. I show that the pro-tantoist claim is true and that the specificationist retort is false on two counts: explanation in terms of compensation-rights is not applicable to all cases; and it fails to account for the moral dynamic in the cases to which it is applicable. The contention that rights are pro-tanto does not conflict with the substance of the contention that rights are trumps, despite claims of specificationists to the contrary. (shrink)
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  32. Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton.Marius Stan - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7:257-308.
    Newton had a fivefold argument that true motion must be motion in absolute space, not relative to matter. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant takes all motion to be relative to matter, not to space itself. Thus, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. I reconstruct here Kant’s answer in detail. I prove that Kant addresses just one part of Newton’s case, namely, his “argument from the effects” of rotation. And, to show (...)
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  33.  13
    An Absolute Distinction Between Faith and Science: Contrast Without Compartmentalization.Hermen Kroesbergen - 2018 - Zygon 53 (1):9-28.
    This article argues for acknowledging the existence of an absolute distinction between faith and science. It is often assumed in the science and religion debate that such a distinction would be ahistorical and uncontextual. After discussing this critique, the analogy with love and facts will be used to explain how an absolute distinction between faith and science may exist nonetheless. This contrast, however, does not imply compartmentalization. It is shown that the absolute distinction between faith and science (...)
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  34. Absolute Biological Needs.Stephen K. McLeod - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (6):293-301.
    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb ‘need’ has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is (...)
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  35. Newton's Absolute Time.H. Kochiras - 2016 - In S. Gerogiorgakis (ed.), Time and Tense: Unifying the Old and the New. Munich: Philosophia (Basic Philosophical Concepts). pp. 169-195.
    When Newton articulated the concept of absolute time in his treatise, Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy), along with its correlate, absolute space, he did not present it as anything controversial. Whereas his references to attraction are accompanied by the self- protective caveats that typically signal an expectation of censure, the Scholium following Principia’s definitions is free of such remarks, instead elaborating his ideas as clarifications of concepts that, in some manner, we already possess. This (...)
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  36. Plato’s Absolute and Relative Categories at Sophist 255c14.Matthew Duncombe - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):77-86.
    Sophist 255c14 distinguishes καθ’ αὑτά and πρὸς ἄλλα (in relation to others). Many commentators identify this with the ‘absolute’ and ‘relative’ category distinction. However, terms such as ‘same’ cannot fit into either category. Several reliable manuscripts read πρὸς ἄλληλα (in relation to each other) for πρὸς ἄλλα. I show that πρὸς ἄλληλα is a palaeographically plausible reading which accommodates the problematic terms. I then defend my reading against objections.
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  37.  33
    Climate Change Attribution.Elisabeth A. Lloyd & Naomi Oreskes - 2019 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 56 (1):185-201.
    A specific form of research question, for instance, “What is the probability of a certain class of weather events, given global climate change, relative to a world without?” could be answered with the use of FAR or RR as the most common approaches to discover and ascribe extreme weather events. Kevin Trenberth et al. and Theodore Shepherd have expressed doubts in their latest works whether it is the most appropriate explanatory tool or the way of public outreach concerning climate events (...)
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  38. Reconsidering Kantian Absolute Space in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science From a Huygensian Frame.Edward Slowik - 2017 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 6 (2):119-141.
    This essay explores Kant’s concept of absolute space in the Metaphysical Foundations from the perspective of the development of the relationist interpretation of bodily interactions in the center-of-mass reference frame, a strategy that Huygens had originally pioneered and which Mach also endorsed. In contrast to the interpretations of Kant that stress a non-relationist, Newton-inspired orientation in his critical period work, it will be argued that the content and function of Kant’s utilization of this reference frame strategy places him much (...)
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  39. Is Standpoint Theory a Resource for Feminist Epistemology? An Introduction.Sharon Crasnow - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):189 - 192.
    Introduction to cluster of papers on feminist standpoint theory.
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  40. Feminist Politics and Epistemology: The Standpoint of Women.Alison M. Jaggar - 2004 - In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge. pp. 55--66.
  41. Ethics and Epidemiology: The Income Debate.Gopal Sreenivasan - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):45-52.
    Gopal Sreenivasan, 201 West Duke Building, Box 90743, Durham NC USA 27708. Email: gopal.sreenivasan{at}duke.edu ' + u + '@ ' + d + ' '/ /- ->This paper reviews the epidemiological debate between the relative income hypothesis and the absolute income hypothesis. The dispute between these rival hypotheses has to do with whether an adequate account of the relationship between income and life expectancy requires the definition of ‘income’ to include any comparative element. I discuss the evidence offered for (...)
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  42.  6
    Das Ubersinnliche Substrat Aller Seiner Vermogen.Martin Bunte - 2019 - Fichte-Studien 47:163-180.
    This paper examines the underdetermined relation between the absolute and absolute knowledge. Fichte not only claimed that he provided the correct reading of Kant’s critical philosophy but also that his Wissenschaftslehre constructively addressed and resolved its systematic problems. By discussing Kant’s notion of a “transcendental substrate” and its relation to the “thing-in-itself” it will be shown that this claim has to be taken seriously even from a Kantian standpoint. Moreover, it will be shown that Fichte's critical assessment (...)
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  43. Concepts of Space: The History of Theories of Space in Physics.MAX JAMMER - 1954 - Dover Publications.
    Newly updated study surveys concept of space from standpoint of historical development. Space in antiquity, Judeo-Christian ideas about space, Newton’s concept of absolute space, space from 18th century to present. Extensive new chapter (6) reviews changes in philosophy of space since publication of second edition (1969). Numerous original quotations and bibliographical references. "...admirably compact and swiftly paced style."—Philosophy of Science. Foreword by Albert Einstein. Bibliography.
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  44.  37
    The Crane's Walk: Plato, Pluralism, and the Inconstancy of Truth.Jeremy Barris - 2009 - Fordham University Press.
    In The Crane's Walk, Jeremy Barris seeks to show that we can conceive and live with a pluralism of standpoints with conflicting standards for truth--with the truth of each being entirely unaffected by the truth of the others. He argues that Plato's work expresses this kind of pluralism, and that this pluralism is important in its own right, whether or not we agree about what Plato's standpoint is.The longest tradition of Plato scholarship identifies crucial faults in Plato's theory of (...)
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  45. Meillassoux’s Virtual Future.Graham Harman - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):78-91.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  46.  62
    Through the Moral Maze: Searching for Absolute Values in a Pluralistic World.Robert Kane - 1994 - North Castle Books.
    "On the ... issue of our pluralistic age -- whether we can continue to believe in absolute value -- Robert Kane has written the most helpful discussion I know.
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  47.  61
    Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information.Sarah C. Creel & Melanie A. Tumlin - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):224-260.
    Three experiments explored online recognition in a nonspeech domain, using a novel experimental paradigm. Adults learned to associate abstract shapes with particular melodies, and at test they identified a played melody’s associated shape. To implicitly measure recognition, visual fixations to the associated shape versus a distractor shape were measured as the melody played. Degree of similarity between associated melodies was varied to assess what types of pitch information adults use in recognition. Fixation and error data suggest that adults naturally recognize (...)
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  48. Petera Knauera koncepcja wyboru moralnego. W sprawie kreatywizmu antropologicznego we wspólczesnej teologii moralnej.Marek Piechowiak - 1989 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 37 (2):21.
    PETER KNAUER'S CONCEPTION OF MORAL CHOICE ON THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL CREAITVENESS IN MODERN MORAL THEOLOGY Summary The author undertakes a critical analysis of the ethical views of Peter Knauer who is one of the most influential theological moralist today. The author tends to show the consequences of Knauer's theory which consequences are destructive for morality. The first part of the paper presents Knauer's standpoint in view of the conception of moral choice and shows three crucial points of his system. They (...)
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    What Can the Global Observer Know?D. Gasparyan - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (2):227-237.
    Context: The detection of objective reality, truth, and lies are still heated topics in epistemology. When discussing these topics, philosophers often resort to certain thought experiments, engaging an important concept that can be broadly identified as “the global observer.” It relates to Putnam’s God’s Eye, Davidson’s Omniscient Interpreter, and the ultimate observer in quantum physics, among others. Problem: The article explores the notion of the global observer as the guarantor of the determinability and configuration of events in the world. It (...)
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    The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795-1804.Dalia Nassar - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    The absolute was one of the most significant philosophical concepts in the early nineteenth century, particularly for the German romantics. Its exact meaning and its role within philosophical romanticism remain, however, a highly contested topic among contemporary scholars. In The Romantic Absolute, I offer a new assessment of the romantics and their understanding of the absolute, filling an important gap in the history of philosophy, especially with respect to the crucial period between Kant and Hegel.
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