Results for 'academics'

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  1. How Academics Can Help People Make Better Decisions Concerning Global Poverty.Keith Horton - 2012 - Ethics and International Affairs 26 (2):265-278.
    One relatively straightforward way in which academics could have more impact on global poverty is by doing more to help people make wise decisions about issues relevant to such poverty. Academics could do this by conducting appropriate kinds of research on those issues and sharing what they have learned with the relevant decision makers in accessible ways. But aren’t academics already doing this? In the case of many of those issues, I think the appropriate answer would be (...)
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  2.  35
    Developing a Code of Ethics for Academics.Celia Fisher - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):171-179.
    This article discusses the possibilities and pitfalls of constructing a code of ethics for university professors. Professional, educational, legal, and policy questions regarding the goals, format, and content of an academic ethics code are raised and a series of aspirational principles and enforceable standards that might be included in such a document are presented for discussion and debate.
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  3.  23
    A Social Cognition Framework for Examining Moral Awareness in Managers and Academics.Jennifer Jordan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):237-258.
    This investigation applies a social cognition framework to examine moral awareness in business situations. Using a vignette-based instrument, the investigation compares the recall, recognition, and ascription of importance to moral-versus strategy-related issues in business managers (n = 86) and academic professors (n = 61). Results demonstrate that managers recall strategy-related issues more than moral-related issues and recognize and ascribe importance to moral-related issues less than academics. It also finds an inverse relationship between socialization in the business context and moral (...)
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  4. Academics Leave Your Ivory Tower: Form Communities of Practice.Sheryl Buckley & Adeline Du Toit - 2010 - Educational Studies 36 (5):493-503.
    Institutions of higher education , public and private, are moving through a crisis period of tapped‐out states, funding cuts, tuition increases and layoffs. It makes good sense to rise to meet these new realities with new ways of doing things, and the places that succeed will be the ones that do. A holistic approach is necessary whereby excellence in teaching and learning as well as research should be the ultimate aim. Among the various ways to achieve this, is the promotion (...)
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  5.  29
    Communism, Universalism and Disinterestedness: Re-Examining Contemporary Support Among Academics for Merton's Scientific Norms. [REVIEW]Bruce Macfarlane & Ming Cheng - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):67-78.
    This paper re-examines the relevance of three academic norms to contemporary academic life – communism, universalism and disinterestedness – based on the work of Robert Merton. The results of a web-based survey elicited responses to a series of value statements and were analysed using the weighted average method and through cross-tabulation. Results indicate strong support for communism as an academic norm defined in relation to sharing research results and teaching materials as opposed to protecting intellectual copyright and withholding access. There (...)
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  6.  19
    Are Academics Committed to Accounting Ethics Education?Sally Gunz & John McCutcheon - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1145-1154.
    This paper reviews the current commitment of accounting academics to teaching accounting ethics. In the course of the review it assesses the recent initiative of the American Accounting Association; namely, Ethics in the Accounting Curriculum: Cases and Readings, 1994. This collection of cases has not been widely adopted despite an identified lack of case materials available to those teaching accounting ethics. The question becomes whether the lack of adoption suggests that accounting academics are not particularly interested in incorporating (...)
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  7.  22
    Designing Sustainable Agriculture Education: Academics' Suggestions for an Undergraduate Curriculum at a Land Grant University. [REVIEW]Damian M. Parr, Cary J. Trexler, Navina R. Khanna & Bryce T. Battisti - 2007 - Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):523-533.
    Historically, land grant universities and their colleges of agriculture have been discipline driven in both their curricula and research agendas. Critics call for interdisciplinary approaches to undergraduate curriculum. Concomitantly, sustainable agriculture (SA) education is beginning to emerge as a way to address many complex social and environmental problems. University of California at Davis faculty, staff, and students are developing an undergraduate SA major. To inform this process, a web-based Delphi survey of academics working in fields related to SA was (...)
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  8.  25
    Local Food Policy Coalitions: Evaluation Issues as Seen by Academics, Project Organizers, and Funders. [REVIEW]Karen L. Webb, David Pelletier, Audrey N. Maretzki & Jennifer Wilkins - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):65-75.
    Several different evaluation issuesare perceived as important by people involved withinnovative projects intended to improve local food andnutrition systems; particularly the establishment oflocal food policy coalitions. Several such coalitionshave been formed in North America, Europe, andAustralia with the goal of improving community foodsecurity and promoting sustainable local food systems.Pioneer coalitions have served as models, yet therehas been little systematic evaluation of thesemodels. A qualitative study was conducted to identifyfactors that may hinder evaluation efforts. In grouptelephone interviews, we sought the views (...)
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  9.  5
    Attitudes of Public Health Academics Toward Receiving Funds From for-Profit Corporations: A Systematic Review.Rima T. Nakkash, Sanaa Mugharbil, Hala Alaouié & Rima A. Afifi - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3).
    With dwindling support from governments toward universities, university–industry partnerships have increased. Ethical concerns over such partnerships have been documented, are particularly relevant when an institution receives money from a corporation whose products do harm and are intensified for academic public health institutions whose missions include promoting well-being. Academics in medicine and nutrition have often failed to recognize the potential conflicts of industry-sponsored research. It is unclear if research to date has explored attitudes of public health academics toward accepting (...)
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  10.  8
    Empowering Academics the Viskerian Way.J. L. van der Walt, F. J. Potgieter & C. C. Wolhuter - 2010 - South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):223-240.
    Academics and/or scholars increasingly feel that their academic voice (combined or individual) has been squelched by the demands of performativity in its various guises, and resultantly, that they have been caught up in a process of steady disempowerment. Rather, it should be their right to be free to use their positions in the pursuit of scholarship as their conscience and their expert knowledge of their subject dictate. Academics should be free to question for themselves the boundaries of their (...)
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  11.  8
    An Academy for Non-Academics.J. R. Lucas - manuscript
    One of the great virtues of Oxford is that most of its members are not academics, nor ever supposed that they sould be. They come to Oxford for three or four years and then go on their way to other occupations in "the service of God in Church and State". It is not that they were not good enough to become dons: it is simply that they had other fish to fry, and would rather be a barrister, a Member (...)
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  12.  2
    Reactively, Proactively, Implicitly, Explicitly? Academics’ Pedagogical Conceptions of How to Promote Research Ethics and Integrity.Heidi Hyytinen & Erika Löfström - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):23-41.
    This article focuses on academics’ conceptions of teaching research ethics and integrity. Seventeen academics from a Finnish research intensive university participated in this qualitative study. The data were collected using a qualitative multi-method approach, including think-aloud and interview data. The material was scrutinized using thematic analysis, with both deductive and inductive approaches. The results revealed variation in academics’ views on the responsibility for teaching research integrity, the methods employed to teach it and the necessity of intervening when (...)
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  13.  8
    The Role of Business Ethics: Where Next? Is There a Role for Academics?Norman Bowie - 2001 - Business Ethics 10 (4):288–293.
    In his address to the conference Norman Bowie contrasted the business ethics climate in the US with that of the UK. He highlighted the adversarial nature of US corporate cultures and the heavy emphasis on compliance‐based programs, and contrasted this with the more collaborative relationships in the UK – and in Europe generally – which lead to partnerships with NGOs as a way to resolve ethical issues. However, the growing insistence that business ethics should pay is common to both business (...)
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  14.  2
    Using Academics' Perceptions of University Environment to Distinguish Between Australian Universities.Jeffrey P. Dorman - 2000 - Educational Studies 26 (2):205-212.
    This paper reports a discriminant analysis of Australian universities using academics' perceptions of their university-level environment. A sample of 514 academics from 52 departments in 26 publicly funded universities responded to the University-Level Environment Questionnaire, which assesses academic’s perceptions of seven dimensions of institutional environment . Discriminant analysis revealed that the four university types were separated by the first discriminant function, with long-established universities separated widely from new universities. Concern for Research and Scholarship was the major discriminating variable, (...)
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  15.  1
    The Role of Business Ethics: Where Next? Is There a Role for Academics?Norman Bowie - 2001 - Business Ethics 10 (4):288-293.
    In his address to the conference Norman Bowie contrasted the business ethics climate in the US with that of the UK. He highlighted the adversarial nature of US corporate cultures and the heavy emphasis on compliance‐based programs, and contrasted this with the more collaborative relationships in the UK – and in Europe generally – which lead to partnerships with NGOs as a way to resolve ethical issues. However, the growing insistence that business ethics should pay is common to both business (...)
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  16. Ethics and the ‘Human Terrain’: The Role of Academics in the Afghan War.George R. Lucas Jr - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):23-30.
    Against the backdrop of the current “ethics controversy” within the American Anthropological Association over the U.S. Army’s “Human Terrain Systems” project, this article evaluates the moral obligations of scholars and academics asked by their governments to contribute their unique expertise toward the waging or ending of wars of which those scholars morally disapprove. Citing the examples of moral dilemmas occasioned by conflicts between duties of scholarship and duties of citizenship from past wars, together with examples like “Doctors without Borders” (...)
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  17. Views of Academics on Academic Impropriety: Work in Progress.Karl O. Jones, Juliet M. V. Reid & Rebecca Bartlett - 2007 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 40 (1):103-112.
     
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  18.  12
    Parallel Universes: Companies, Academics, and the Progress of Corporate Citizenship.Sandra Waddock - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (1):5-42.
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  19.  64
    Dishonesty in Academics and Business: A Cross-Cultural Evaluation of Student Attitudes. [REVIEW]Paul W. Grimes - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (3):273-290.
    This study presents the findings from aninternational survey of college students whichexamined perceptions and attitudes towarddishonesty in academic and business contexts. Data were collected from undergraduate studentsstudying business and economics in eighttransitional economies of Eastern Europe andCentral Asia and from students in the UnitedStates. The results indicate that academiccheating is a common activity in all of thecountries surveyed. Even though most studentsreported fearing the punishment of beingcaught, substantial numbers of studentsindicated that academic cheating is sociallyacceptable and not ethically wrong. When (...)
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  20.  1
    Difficult Decisions: A Qualitative Exploration of the Statistical Decision Making Process From the Perspectives of Psychology Students and Academics.Peter J. Allen, Kate P. Dorozenko & Lynne D. Roberts - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  21.  11
    Do Spin-Offs Make the Academics' Heads Spin?Arend Zomer, Ben Jongbloed & Jürgen Enders - 2010 - Minerva 48 (3):331-353.
    As public research organisations are increasingly driven by their national and regional governments to engage in knowledge transfer, they have started to support the creation of companies. These research based spin-off companies (RBSOs) often keep contacts with the research institutes they originate from. In this paper we present the results of a study of four research institutes within two universities and two non-university public research organisations (PROs) in the Netherlands. We show that research organisations have distinct motivations to support the (...)
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  22. Collaborative Administration: Academics and Administrators in Higher Education.Martinelli-Fernandez Susan A. - 2009 - In Elaine Englehardt (ed.), The Ethical Challenges of Academic Administration. Springer.
    This book is an invitation to academic administrators, at every level, to engage in reflection on the ethical dimensions of their working lives.
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  23.  19
    Academics Versus Pyrrhonists, Reconsidered.Gisela Striker - 2010 - In Richard Arnot Home Bett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 195.
  24.  2
    Policing Academics: The Arkhè of Transformation in Academic Ranking.John Welsh - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):246-263.
    ABSTRACTThis article attempts a properly critical and political analysis of the “police power” immanent to the form and logic of academic rankings, and which is reproduced in the extant academic literature generated around them. In contrast to the democratising claims made of rankings, this police power short-circuits the moment of democratic politics and establishes the basis for the oligarchic power of the State and its status quo. Central in this founding political moment is the notion of the Arkhè, a necessarily (...)
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  25.  20
    Outreach, Impact, Collaboration: Why Academics Should Join to Stand Against Poverty.Thomas Pogge & Luis Cabrera - 2012 - Ethics and International Affairs 26 (2):163-182.
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  26.  6
    ‘You Can't Stop Undergraduates Asking Silly Questions’: Academics' Views on Submission of Undergraduate Student Projects for Ethical Review.Jenny Scott, Karen Rodham, Gordon Taylor & Julie Turner-Cobb - 2008 - Research Ethics 4 (4):147-151.
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  27.  11
    Student Academic Dishonesty: What Do Academics Think and Do, and What Are the Barriers to Action?Adele Thomas & Gideon P. De Bruin - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):13.
    The aims of the study were to explore the awareness of and attitudes towards student academic dishonesty at a South African university, and to explore perceived personal and institutional barriers to taking action against such dishonesty. All full-time academic staff at the University of Johannesburg were anonymously surveyed during late 2009. The findings indicated a high level of awareness of student academic dishonesty, with few faculty members taking action against it. Four groups of barriers to preventing and acting on student (...)
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  28.  30
    A History of Intellectuals and the Demise of the New Class: Academics and the U.S. Government in the 1960s. [REVIEW]Eleanor Townsley - 2000 - Theory and Society 29 (6):739-784.
  29.  2
    Navigating Between Extremes: Academics Helping to Eradicate Global Poverty.Roger C. Riddell - 2012 - Ethics and International Affairs 26 (2):217-243.
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  30.  37
    What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners.Anna Katharina Höchstädter & Barbara Scheck - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):449-475.
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  31.  38
    Animals, Animists, and Academics.Graham Harvey - 2006 - Zygon 41 (1):9-20.
  32.  7
    Faith, Reason, and the Christian University: What Pope John Paul II Can Teach Christian Academics.Francis J. Beckwith - 2009 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 12 (3):53-67.
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  33.  15
    The British Academics.A. H. Halsey & Martin Trow - 1972 - British Journal of Educational Studies 20 (2):223-224.
  34.  2
    Academics and Entrepreneurs: Factors Affecting the Quality and Utility of Government-Sponsored Research.Lois Recascino Wise - 1988 - Knowledge in Society 1 (1):85-103.
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  35.  33
    Academics and Pyrrhonists.R. J. Hankinson - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
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  36.  4
    A Literature and Medicine Special Study Module Run by Academics in General Practice: Two Evaluations and the Lessons Learnt.L. Jacobson - 2004 - Medical Humanities 30 (2):98-100.
    This paper describes the design, delivery and evaluation of a nine week special study module on literature and medicine for third year undergraduate medical students, by tutors from an academic department of general practice. Three weeks of taught seminars are followed by three weeks of one on one meetings between individual students and tutors, leading to a seminar led by, and based on, materials prepared by the student. The final three weeks of the course are dedicated to completion of essays (...)
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  37.  18
    Risk Preferences of Australian Academics: Where Retirement Funds Are Invested Tells the Story.Pavlo R. Blavatskyy - 2016 - Theory and Decision 80 (3):411-426.
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  38.  22
    Think Tanks, Free Market Academics, and the Triumph of the Right.Fred Block - 2013 - Theory and Society 42 (6):647-651.
  39.  2
    The Role of Business Ethics: Where Next? Is There a Role for Academics?Norman Bowie - 2001 - Business Ethics: A European Review 10 (4):288-293.
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  40. Academics and Practitioners: Nurses as Intellectuals.Colin A. Holmes - 2002 - Nursing Inquiry 9 (2):73-83.
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  41.  18
    ASAP, Academics Stand Against Poverty.- -- - 2013 - Dilemata 13.
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  42.  2
    The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do?Mark G. Kuczewski & Danish Zaidi - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):1-3.
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  43.  12
    John J. O'Meara: St. Augustine Against the Academics. Pp. Vi + 214. Westminster, Maryland: Newman Press, 1950. Cloth, $3.00. [REVIEW]S. L. Greenslade - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (3-4):233-234.
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  44.  30
    Academics as Intellectuals.Ronald Barnett - 2003 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (4):108-122.
  45. Plutarch on the Difference Between the Pyrrhonists and the Academics.M. Bonazzi - 2012 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 43--271.
     
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  46.  18
    Message to Fellow Academics About to Publish (Rant Against Publishers' Copy-Editors).Aaron Sloman - manuscript
    Note added 3 Nov 2009: Having received a number of email comments, I thought some future comments might as well be made public. If you would like to have a comment added here, please send it to me, and I'll consider adding it. Plain text or html only please -- no .doc files, pdf, etc.
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  47.  11
    Altered States, Conflicting Cultures: Shamans, Neo‐Shamans and Academics.Robert J. Wallis - 1999 - Anthropology of Consciousness 10 (2‐3):41-49.
  48.  19
    Socrates Amidst the Academics?Jeffrey S. Turner - 1991 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):255 – 278.
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  49.  7
    Academics Transformational Leadership: An Investigation of Heads of Department Leadership Behaviours in Malaysian Public Universities.Lokman Tahir, Tina Abdullah, Fadzli Ali & Khadijah Daud - 2014 - Educational Studies 40 (5):473-495.
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    Academics Anonymous: A Meditation on Anonymity, Power, and Powerlessness.Robyn Warhol-Down - 2008 - Symploke 16 (1-2):51-59.
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