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Alan M. S. J. Coffee [9]Alan Coffee [2]
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Profile: Alan M. S. J. Coffee (King's College London)
  1.  81
    Mary Wollstonecraft, Freedom and the Enduring Power of Social Domination.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2013 - European Journal of Political Theory 12 (2):116-135.
    Even long after their formal exclusion has come to an end, members of previously oppressed social groups often continue to face disproportionate restrictions on their freedom, as the experience of many women over the last century has shown. Working within in a framework in which freedom is understood as independence from arbitrary power, Mary Wollstonecraft provides an explanation of why such domination may persist and offers a model through which it can be addressed. Republicans rely on processes of rational public (...)
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  2.  32
    Freedom as Independence: Mary Wollstonecraft and the Grand Blessing of Life.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2013 - Hypatia (1):908-924.
    Independence is a central and recurring theme in Wollstonecraft’s work. Independence should not be understood as an individualistic ideal that is in tension with the value of community but as an essential ingredient in successful and flourishing social relationships. I examine three aspects of this rich and complex concept that Wollstonecraft draws on as she develops her own notion of independence as a powerful feminist tool. First, independence is an egalitarian ideal that requires that all individuals, regardless of sex, are (...)
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  3.  61
    Two Spheres of Domination: Republican Theory, Social Norms and the Insufficiency of Negative Freedom.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2015 - Contemporary Political Theory 14 (1):45-62.
    Republicans understand freedom as the guaranteed protection against any arbitrary use of coercive power. This freedom is exercised within a political community, and the concept of arbitrariness is defined with reference to the actual ideas of its citizens about what is in their shared interests. According to many current defenders of the republican model, this form of freedom is understood in strictly negative terms representing an absence of domination. I argue that this assumption is misguided. First, it is internally inconsistent. (...)
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  4. Republicanism and Political Theory, Edited by Cécile Laborde and John Maynor.Alan Coffee - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):323-327.
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  5.  70
    Republicanism and Political Theory, Edited by Cécile Laborde and John Maynor.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):323-327.
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  6. Inclusivity and Equality: Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion in Republican Society.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2008 - Politics in Central Europe 4 (2):26-40.
    Balancing citizens’ freedom thought, conscience and religion with the authority of the law which applies to all citizens alike presents an especial challenge for the governments of European nations with socially diverse and pluralistic populations. I address this problem from within the republican tradition represented by Machiavelli, Harrington and Madison. Republicans have historically focused on public debate as the means to identify a set of shared interests which the law should uphold in the interests of all. Within pluralistic societies, however, (...)
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  7.  21
    Republican Theory and Spanish Social Democracy.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2009 - Renewal 17 (2):85-9.
  8.  12
    Cluster Introduction: Mary Wollstonecraft: Philosophy and Enlightenment.Martina Reuter, Lena Halldenius & Alan Coffee - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):906-907.
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  9.  4
    The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft.Sandrine Bergès & Alan M. S. J. Coffee (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Interest in the contribution made by women to the history of philosophy is burgeoning. At the forefront of this revival is Mary Wollstonecraft. While she has long been studied by feminists, and later discovered by political scientists, philosophers themselves have only recently begun to recognise the value of her work for their discipline. This volume brings together new essays from leading scholars, which explore Wollstonecraft's range as a moral and political philosopher of note, both taking a historical perspective and applying (...)
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  10. Catharine Macaulay’s Republican Conception of Social and Political Liberty.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - forthcoming - Political Studies.
    Catharine Macaulay was one of the most significant republican writers of her generation. Although there has been a revival of interest in Macaulay amongst feminists and intellectual historians, neo-republican writers have yet to examine the theoretical content of her work in any depth. Since she anticipates and addresses a number of themes that still preoccupy republicans, this neglect represents a serious loss to the discipline. I examine Macaulay’s conception of freedom, showing how she uses the often misunderstood notion of virtue (...)
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  11. Mary Wollstonecraft, Public Reason and the Virtuous Republic.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2016 - In Sandrine Berges & Alan Coffee (eds.), The Social and Political philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft. Oxford University Press. pp. 183-200.
    Although ‘virtue’ is a complex idea in Wollstonecraft’s work, one of its senses refers to the capacity and willingness to govern one’s own conduct rationally, and to employ this ability in deliberating about matters of public concern. Wollstonecraft understands virtue to be integral to the meaning of freedom rather than as merely instrumentally useful for its preservation. It follows, therefore, that a free republic must be a virtuous one. The first virtue of social institutions, we might say, is ‘virtue’ itself. (...)
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