Results for 'alphoid DNA'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  49
    The 'Kinetochore Maintenance Loop'—The Mark of Regulation?William R. A. Brown & Zheng-yao Xu - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (2):228-236.
  2.  47
    Cancer, Viruses, and Mass Migration: Paul Berg’s Venture Into Eukaryotic Biology and the Advent of Recombinant DNA Research and Technology, 1967–1980. [REVIEW]Doogab Yi - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (4):589 - 636.
    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  3.  55
    Junk or Functional DNA? ENCODE and the Function Controversy.Pierre-Luc Germain, Emanuele Ratti & Federico Boem - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (6):807-831.
    In its last round of publications in September 2012, the Encyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) assigned a biochemical function to most of the human genome, which was taken up by the media as meaning the end of ‘Junk DNA’. This provoked a heated reaction from evolutionary biologists, who among other things claimed that ENCODE adopted a wrong and much too inclusive notion of function, making its dismissal of junk DNA merely rhetorical. We argue that this criticism rests on misunderstandings concerning (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  12
    A New Insight Into Sanger’s Development of Sequencing: From Proteins to DNA, 1943–1977. [REVIEW]Miguel García-Sancho - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):265 - 323.
    Fred Sanger, the inventor of the first protein, RNA and DNA sequencing methods, has traditionally been seen as a technical scientist, engaged in laboratory bench work and not interested at all in intellectual debates in biology. In his autobiography and commentaries by fellow researchers, he is portrayed as having a trajectory exclusively dependent on technological progress. The scarce historical scholarship on Sanger partially challenges these accounts by highlighting the importance of professional contacts, institutional and disciplinary moves in his career, spanning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5. Genome Informatics: The Role of DNA in Cellular Computations.James A. Shapiro - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (3):288-301.
    Cells are cognitive entities possessing great computational power. DNA serves as a multivalent information storage medium for these computations at various time scales. Information is stored in sequences, epigenetic modifications, and rapidly changing nucleoprotein complexes. Because DNA must operate through complexes formed with other molecules in the cell, genome functions are inherently interactive and involve two-way communication with various cellular compartments. Both coding sequences and repetitive sequences contribute to the hierarchical systemic organization of the genome. By virtue of nucleoprotein complexes, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. Model for DNA and Protein Interactions and the Function of the Operator.Alfred Gierer - 1966 - Nature 212:1480-1481.
    The short paper introduces the concept of possible branches of double-stranded DNA (later sometimes called palindromes): Certain sequences of nucleotides may be followed, after a short unpaired stretch, by a complementary sequence in reversed order, such that each DNA strand can fold back on itself, and the DNA assumes a cruciform or tree-like structure. This is postulated to interact with regulatory proteins. -/- .
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  84
    Paternity Between Law and Biology: The Reconstruction of the Islamic Law of Paternity in the Wake of Dna Testing.Ayman Shabana - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):214-239.
    Abstract: The discovery of DNA paternity tests has stirred a debate concerning the definition of paternity and whether the grounds for such a definition are legal or biological. According to the classical rules of Islamic law, paternity is established and negated on the basis of a valid marriage. Modern biomedical technology raises the question of whether paternity tests can be the sole basis for paternity, even independently of marriage. Although on the surface this technology seems to challenge the authority of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  17
    Informed Decision Making About Predictive DNA Tests: Arguments for More Public Visibility of Personal Deliberations About the Good Life. [REVIEW]Marianne Boenink & Simone van der Burg - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):127-138.
    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of people’s life. The decision whether or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes to supporting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9. The Theoretical Costs of DNA Barcoding.Monika Piotrowska - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):235-239.
    I begin with a description of the benefits and limits of DNA barcoding as presented by its advocates not its critics. Next, I argue that due to the mutually dependent relationship between defining and delimiting species, all systems of classification are grounded in theory, even if only implicitly. I then proceed to evaluate DNA barcoding in that context. In particular, I focus on the barcoders’ use of a sharp boundary by which to delimit species, arguing that this boundary brings along (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  57
    DNA Patents and Scientific Discovery and Innovation: Assessing Benefits and Risks.David B. Resnik - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):29-62.
    This paper focuses on the question of whether DNA patents help or hinder scientific discovery and innovation. While DNA patents create a wide variety of possible benefits and harms for science and technology, the evidence we have at this point in time supports the conclusion that they will probably promote rather than hamper scientific discovery and innovation. However, since DNA patenting is a relatively recent phenomena and the biotechnology industry is in its infancy, we should continue to gather evidence about (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  49
    Beware! Uncle Sam has Your DNA: Legal Fallout From its Use and Misuse in the U.S. [REVIEW]Marcia J. Weiss - 2004 - Ethics and Information Technology 6 (1):55-63.
    Technology has provided state and federal governments with huge collections of DNA samples and identifying profiles stored in databanks. That information can be used to solve crimes by matching samples from convicted felons to unsolved crimes, and has aided law enforcement in investigating and convicting suspects, and exonerating innocent felons, even after lengthy incarceration. Rights surrounding the provision of DNA samples, however, remain unclear in light of the constitutional guarantee against unreasonable searches and seizures and privacy concerns. The courts have (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12.  35
    Silent Witness, Articulate Collective: Dna Evidence and the Inference of Visible Traits.Amade M'charek - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (9):519-528.
    DNA profiling is a well-established technology for use in the criminal justice system, both in courtrooms and elsewhere. The fact that DNA profiles are based on non-coding DNA and do not reveal details about the physical appearance of an individual has contributed to the acceptability of this type of evidence. Its success in criminal investigation, combined with major innovations in the field of genetics, have contributed to a change of role for this type of evidence. Nowadays DNA evidence is not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  65
    From DNA- to NA-Centrism and the Conditions for Gene-Centrism Revisited.Alexis De Tiège, Koen Tanghe, Johan Braeckman & Yves Van de Peer - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):55-69.
    First the ‘Weismann barrier’ and later on Francis Crick’s ‘central dogma’ of molecular biology nourished the gene-centric paradigm of life, i.e., the conception of the gene/genome as a ‘central source’ from which hereditary specificity unidirectionally flows or radiates into cellular biochemistry and development. Today, due to advances in molecular genetics and epigenetics, such as the discovery of complex post-genomic and epigenetic processes in which genes are causally integrated, many theorists argue that a gene-centric conception of the organism has become problematic. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  22
    Addressing Cancer Chemotherapeutic Toxicity, Resistance, and Heterogeneity: Novel Theranostic Use of DNA‐Encoded Small Molecule Libraries.Gerald Kolodny, Xiaoyu Li & Steven Balk - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (10):1800057.
    Major problems in cancer chemotherapy are toxicity, resistance, and cancer heterogeneity. A new theranostic paradigm has been proposed by the authors. Many million small molecules (SM) are bound to the proteins extracted from a patient's cancer. SM that also bind proteins extracted from normal human tissues are subtracted from the cancer protein bound SM leaving a large array of SM targeting many sites on each of the cancer biomarkers. Targeting many more than the conventional 1 – 4 cancer biomarkers will (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  21
    How Acts of Infidelity Promote DNA Break Repair: Collision and Collusion Between DNA Repair and Transcription.Priya Sivaramakrishnan, Alasdair J. E. Gordon, Jennifer A. Halliday & Christophe Herman - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (10):1800045.
    Transcription is a fundamental cellular process and the first step in gene regulation. Although RNA polymerase (RNAP) is highly processive, in growing cells the progression of transcription can be hindered by obstacles on the DNA template, such as damaged DNA. The authors recent findings highlight a trade‐off between transcription fidelity and DNA break repair. While a lot of work has focused on the interaction between transcription and nucleotide excision repair, less is known about how transcription influences the repair of DNA (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  23
    Epigenetic Modifications of Cytosine: Biophysical Properties, Regulation, and Function in Mammalian DNA.Jack S. Hardwick, Andrew N. Lane & Tom Brown - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (3):1700199.
    To decode the function and molecular recognition of several recently discovered cytosine derivatives in the human genome – 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine – a detailed understanding of their effects on the structural, chemical, and biophysical properties of DNA is essential. Here, we review recent literature in this area, with particular emphasis on features that have been proposed to enable the specific recognition of modified cytosine bases by DNA-binding proteins. These include electronic factors, modulation of base-pair stability, flexibility, and radical changes (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  16
    Synthetic Versus Analytic Approaches to Protein and DNA Structure Determination.Agnes Bolinska - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (3-4):26.
    The structures of protein and DNA were discovered primarily by means of synthesizing component-level information about bond types, lengths, and angles, rather than analyzing X-ray diffraction photographs of these molecules. In this paper, I consider the synthetic and analytic approaches to exemplify alternative heuristics for approaching mid-twentieth-century macromolecular structure determination. I argue that the former was, all else being equal, likeliest to generate the correct structure in the shortest period of time. I begin by characterizing problem solving in these cases (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  11
    Structural Biology of the HEAT‐Like Repeat Family of DNA Glycosylases.Rongxin Shi, Xing‐Xing Shen, Antonis Rokas & Brandt F. Eichman - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (11):1800133.
    DNA glycosylases remove aberrant DNA nucleobases as the first enzymatic step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The alkyl‐DNA glycosylases AlkC and AlkD adopt a unique structure based on α‐helical HEAT repeats. Both enzymes identify and excise their substrates without a base‐flipping mechanism used by other glycosylases and nucleic acid processing proteins to access nucleobases that are otherwise stacked inside the double‐helix. Consequently, these glycosylases act on a variety of cationic nucleobase modifications, including bulky adducts, not previously associated with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  17
    How Does a Helicase Unwind DNA? Insights From RecBCD Helicase.Timothy M. Lohman & Nicole T. Fazio - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (6):1800009.
    DNA helicases are a class of molecular motors that catalyze processive unwinding of double stranded DNA. In spite of much study, we know relatively little about the mechanisms by which these enzymes carry out the function for which they are named. Most current views are based on inferences from crystal structures. A prominent view is that the canonical ATPase motor exerts a force on the ssDNA resulting in “pulling” the duplex across a “pin” or “wedge” in the enzyme leading to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  18
    Noise in the Machine: Alternative Pathway Sampling is the Rule During DNA Replication.Matthias J. Scherr, Barbara Safaric & Karl E. Duderstadt - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (2):1700159.
    The astonishing efficiency and accuracy of DNA replication has long suggested that refined rules enforce a single highly reproducible sequence of molecular events during the process. This view was solidified by early demonstrations that DNA unwinding and synthesis are coupled within a stable molecular factory, known as the replisome, which consists of conserved components that each play unique and complementary roles. However, recent single-molecule observations of replisome dynamics have begun to challenge this view, revealing that replication may not be defined (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  19
    DNA Methylation in Embryo Development: Epigenetic Impact of ART.Sebastian Canovas, Pablo J. Ross, Gavin Kelsey & Pilar Coy - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (11):1700106.
    DNA methylation can be considered a component of epigenetic memory with a critical role during embryo development, and which undergoes dramatic reprogramming after fertilization. Though it has been a focus of research for many years, the reprogramming mechanism is still not fully understood. Recent results suggest that absence of maintenance at DNA replication is a major factor, and that there is an unexpected role for TET3-mediated oxidation of 5mC to 5hmC in guarding against de novo methylation. Base-resolution and genome-wide profiling (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  16
    PTEN in the Maintenance of Genome Integrity: From DNA Replication to Chromosome Segregation.Sheng-Qi Hou, Meng Ouyang, Andrew Brandmaier, Hongbo Hao & Wen H. Shen - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (10):1700082.
    Faithful DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation are the key machineries of genetic transmission. Disruption of these processes represents a hallmark of cancer and often results from loss of tumor suppressors. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor that is frequently mutated or deleted in human cancer. Loss of PTEN has been associated with aneuploidy and poor prognosis in cancer patients. In mice, Pten deletion or mutation drives genomic instability and tumor development. PTEN deficiency induces DNA replication stress, confers stress tolerance, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  13
    DNA Conformation Regulates Gene Expression: The MYC Promoter and Beyond.Olga Zaytseva & Leonie M. Quinn - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (4):1700235.
    Emerging evidence suggests that DNA topology plays an instructive role in cell fate control through regulation of gene expression. Transcription produces torsional stress, and the resultant supercoiling of the DNA molecule generates an array of secondary structures. In turn, local DNA architecture is harnessed by the cell, acting within sensory feedback mechanisms to mediate transcriptional output. MYC is a potent oncogene, which is upregulated in the majority of cancers; thus numerous studies have focused on detailed understanding of its regulation. Dissection (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  52
    The Ontological Status of Human DNA: Is It Not First and Foremost a Biological ``File Self''?Rogeer Hoedemaekers & Wim Dekkers - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):377-395.
    This paper investigates which of the variouslegal notions proposed for human DNA is themost appropriate from an ontological viewpoint – unique legal status, private property, commonproperty, person, or information. The focus is onthe difficulties that private property, commonproperty and person present. By usingHarré''s notion of ``file-self'''' we arguethat, ontologically, the most appropriate legalnotion to be applied is information. This hasconsequences for storage, control and use ofgenetic information as well as identifiablehuman body material.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  11
    Precarious Maintenance of Simple DNA Repeats in Eukaryotes.Alexander J. Neil, Jane C. Kim & Sergei M. Mirkin - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (9):1700077.
    In this review, we discuss how two evolutionarily conserved pathways at the interface of DNA replication and repair, template switching and break-induced replication, lead to the deleterious large-scale expansion of trinucleotide DNA repeats that cause numerous hereditary diseases. We highlight that these pathways, which originated in prokaryotes, may be subsequently hijacked to maintain long DNA microsatellites in eukaryotes. We suggest that the negative mutagenic outcomes of these pathways, exemplified by repeat expansion diseases, are likely outweighed by their positive role in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  24
    DNA-Banken und Treuhandschaft [DNA Banking and Trusteeship].Doris Schröder & Garrath Williams - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (2):84-95.
    Definition of the problem:The frequency and scope of human genetic banking has increased significantly in recent years and is set to expand still further. Two of the major growth areas in medical research, pharmacogenomics and population genetics, rely on large DNA banks to provide extensive, centralised and standardised genetic information as well as clinical and personal data. This development raises ethical concerns. Arguments and conclusion: Our article focuses on the appropriateness of informed consent as a means to safeguard both research (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Recombinant Dna: Science, Ethics, and Politics.John Richards (ed.) - 1978 - Academic Press.
  28.  21
    Serendipity and the Discovery of DNA.Áurea Anguera de Sojo, Juan Ares, María Aurora Martínez, Juan Pazos, Santiago Rodríguez & José Gabriel Zato - 2014 - Foundations of Science 19 (4):387-401.
    This paper presents the manner in which the DNA, the molecule of life, was discovered. Unlike what many people, even biologists, believe, it was Johannes Friedrich Miescher who originally discovered and isolated nuclein, currently known as DNA, in 1869, 75 years before Watson and Crick unveiled its structure. Also, in this paper we show, and above all demonstrate, the serendipity of this major discovery. Like many of his contemporaries, Miescher set out to discover how cells worked by means of studying (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Mortal and Immortal Dna: Science and the Lure of Myth.Gerald Weissmann - 2009 - Bellevue Literary Press.
    Mortal and immortal DNA : Craig Venter and the lure of "lamia" -- Homeopathy : Holmes, hogwarts, and the Prince of Wales -- Citizen Pinel and the madman at Bellevue -- The experimental pathology of stress : Hans Selye to Paris Hilton -- Gore's fever and Dante's Inferno : Chikungunya reaches Ravenna -- Giving things their proper names : Carl Linnaeus and W.H. Auden -- Spinal irritation and fibromyalgia : Lincoln's surgeon general and the three graces -- Tithonus and the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  15
    Vertane Chancen? Die aktuelle politische Debatte um Erweiterte DNA‐Analysen in Ermittlungsverfahren.Veronika Lipphardt - 2018 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 41 (3):279-301.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  22
    Genome Size, Self‐Organization and DNA's Dark Matter.Ricard V. Solé - 2010 - Complexity 16 (1):20-23.
  32.  9
    Adverse Childhood Experiences Run Deep: Toxic Early Life Stress, Telomeres, and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, the Biological Markers of Cumulative Stress.Kathryn K. Ridout, Mariam Khan & Samuel J. Ridout - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800077.
  33. DNA, Masterpieces, and Abortion: Shifting the Grounds of the Debate.Reed Richter - manuscript
    Writers, philosophers, and theologians have oft made the comparison between being a mature human being and a masterpiece work of art or design. Employing the analogy between the creation of artistic value and the creation of full-fledged human value, this paper stakes out a middle ground between pro-choice and pro-life by considering a more general account of value and the relationship between being a potential X and a mature implementation of X's potential. I argue that the value of a potential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  7
    Stress‐Induced Mutation Via DNA Breaks in Escherichia Coli: A Molecular Mechanism with Implications for Evolution and Medicine.Susan M. Rosenberg, Chandan Shee, Ryan L. Frisch & P. J. Hastings - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (10):885-892.
  35.  4
    Cell Fate Regulation Upon DNA Damage: P53 Serine 46 Kinases Pave the Cell Death Road.Magdalena C. Liebl & Thomas G. Hofmann - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (12):1900127.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  49
    Integrating DNA Barcode Data and Taxonomic Practice: Determination, Discovery, and Description.Paul Z. Goldstein & Rob DeSalle - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (2):135-147.
  37.  11
    DNA Methylation Reprogramming in Cancer: Does It Act by Re‐Configuring the Binding Landscape of Polycomb Repressive Complexes?James P. Reddington, Duncan Sproul & Richard R. Meehan - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (2):134-140.
  38.  11
    Integrating DNA Methylation Dynamics Into a Framework for Understanding Epigenetic Codes.Keith E. Szulwach & Peng Jin - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (1):107-117.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  14
    Phenotypes From Ancient DNA: Approaches, Insights and Prospects.Gloria G. Fortes, Camilla F. Speller, Michael Hofreiter & Turi E. King - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (8):690-695.
  40.  15
    Inhibition of DNA Synthesis Facilitates Expansion of Low‐Complexity Repeats.Andrei Kuzminov - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (4):306-313.
  41.  28
    DNA Repair: The Search for Homology.James E. Haber - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (5):1700229.
    The repair of chromosomal double‐strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination is essential to maintain genome integrity. The key step in DSB repair is the RecA/Rad51‐mediated process to match sequences at the broken end to homologous donor sequences that can be used as a template to repair the lesion. Here, in reviewing research about DSB repair, I consider the many factors that appear to play important roles in the successful search for homology by several homologous recombination mechanisms.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  3
    HIPK2: A Tumour Suppressor That Controls DNA Damage‐Induced Cell Fate and Cytokinesis.Thomas G. Hofmann, Carolina Glas & Nadja Bitomsky - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (1):55-64.
  43.  3
    DNA G‐Quadruplexes Modulate Epigenetic Programming and Chromatin Remodeling.Anna Varizhuk, Ekaterina Isaakova & Galina Pozmogova - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (9):1900091.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  34
    DNA Fingerprinting and the Offertory Prayer: A Sermon.Kim L. Beckmann - 1999 - Zygon 34 (3):537-541.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  18
    Control of DNA Replication: A New Facet of Hox Proteins?Benoit Miotto & Yacine Graba - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (9):800-807.
  46.  21
    Unmasking Risk Loci: DNA Methylation Illuminates the Biology of Cancer Predisposition.Dvir Aran & Asaf Hellman - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (2):184-190.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  12
    Transcription‐Blocking DNA Damage in Aging: A Mechanism for Hormesis.Björn Schumacher - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (12):1347-1356.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  12
    The Consent Process in Medical Research Involving DNA Databanks: Some Ethical Implications and Challenges.Herman T. Tavani & Maria Bottis - 2010 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (2):11-21.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  9
    DNA Supercoiling Helps to Unlink Sister Duplexes After Replication.Alexander Vologodskii - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (1):9-12.
  50.  5
    Der DNA-Chip – Schlüsseltechnologie Für Ethisch Problematische Neue Formen Genetischen Screenings?Wolfram Henn - 1998 - Ethik in der Medizin 10 (3):128-137.
    Definition of the problem: The development of molecular genetics has provided tools not only for the diagnosis of genetic diseases and disease dispositions in affected individuals, but also for the detection of healthy carriers of recessive hereditary traits. The resulting, ethically controversial option of genetic population screening used to be restricted to a small number of rather rare diseases by methodological limitations which are now about to be overcome.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000