Results for 'american indian'

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  1. American Indian Thought: Philosophical Essays.Anne Waters (ed.) - 2004 - Blackwell (Oxford).
    This book brings together a diverse group of American Indian thinkers to discuss traditional and contemporary philosophies and philosophical issues. The essays presented here address philosophical questions pertaining to knowledge, time, place, history, science, law, religion, nationhood, ethics, and art, as understood from a variety of Native American standpoints. Unique in its approach, this volume represents several different tribes and nations and amplifies the voice of contemporary American Indian culture struggling for respect and autonomy. Taken (...)
     
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  2. American Indian Ecology.J. Donald Hughes - 1983 - Texas Western Press, 1983.
     
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  3.  60
    Traditional American Indian and Western European Attitudes Toward Nature: An Overview.J. Baird Callicott - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (4):293-318.
    A generalized traditional Western world view is compared with a generalized traditional American Indian world view in respect to the practical relations implied by either to nature. The Western tradition pictures nature as material, mechanical, and devoid of spirit, while the American Indian tradition pictures nature throughout as an extended family or society of living, ensouled beings. The former picture invites unrestrained exploitation of nonhuman nature, while the latter provides the foundations for ethical restraint in relation (...)
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  4. Traditional American Indian and Western European Attitudes Toward Nature: An Overview.J. Baird Callicott - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (4):293-318.
    A generalized traditional Western world view is compared with a generalized traditional American Indian world view in respect to the practical relations implied by either to nature. The Western tradition pictures nature as material, mechanical, and devoid of spirit (reserving that exclusively for humans), while the American Indian tradition pictures nature throughout as an extended family or society of living, ensouled beings. The former picture invites unrestrained exploitation of nonhuman nature, while the latter provides the foundations (...)
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  5. American Indian Environmental Ethics an Ojibwa Case Study.J. Baird Callicott & Michael P. Nelson - 2004
     
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  6. North American Indian Ecology.J. Donald Hughes - 1996
  7.  13
    No Meaningful Apology for American Indian Unethical Research Abuses.Felicia Schanche Hodge - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):431-444.
    This article reviews the history of medical and research abuses experienced by American Indians since European colonization. This article examines the unethical research of American Indians/Alaska Natives in light of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. Literature citations indicate that significant unethical research and medical care incidents occurred both before and after the Tuskegee Syphilis Study among American Indians/Alaska Natives. The majority of these unethical abuses were committed by the federal government and within (...)
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  8.  13
    American Indian Values and Their Impact on Tribal Economic Development.Jerry D. Stubben - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (3):53-62.
    This study uses 1990 data from seventy-three American Indian tribes to explore factors associated with the adoption of indi genous economic development plans on American Indian reservations. The analyses employing ordinary least squares analytical models posit that the existence of tribally owned and controlled businesses on or near the reservations and the presence of tribally owned farm and ranch operations are most critical in explaining the existence of such plans. A closer scrutiny of this result further (...)
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  9. American Indian Thought: Philosophical Essays Ed. By Anne Waters. [REVIEW]Joshua Hall - 2018 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 54 (2):280-293.
    American Indian Thought is a contemporary collection of twenty-two essays written by Indigenous persons with Western philosophical training, all attempting to formulate, and/or contribute to a sub-discipline of, a Native American Philosophy. The contributors come from diverse tribal, educational, philosophical, methodological, etc., backgrounds, and there is some tension among aspects of the collection, but what is more striking is the harmony and the singularity of the collection’s intent. Part of this singularity may derive from the solidarity among (...)
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  10. The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest.Robert A. Williams - 1992 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Exploring the history of contemporary legal thought on the rights and status of the West's colonized indigenous tribal peoples, Williams here traces the development of the themes that justified and impelled Spanish, English, and American conquests of the New World.
     
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  11.  6
    American Indian Inferiority in Hume's Second Enquiry.Rodney Roberts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):57-66.
    It is fairly well known that Hume added a footnote to his essay ‘Of National Characters’ in which he asserts that all non-white peoples are naturally inferior to white people. Subsequently, he revised the note to assert only that black people are naturally inferior to white people. But while the view expressed in this footnote has been described as ‘shockingly bigoted’, and even as his ‘racial law,’ it is still commonly thought that in Hume's voluminous writings it is apparently just (...)
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  12.  24
    American Indian Thought.Jerome A. Stone - 2004 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (98):67-70.
  13.  2
    The American Indian by Clark, Wissler; The Relation of Nature to Man in Aboriginal America. [REVIEW]George Sarton - 1927 - Isis 9:138-142.
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  14.  3
    The American Indian. Clark, WisslerThe Relation of Nature to Man in Aboriginal America.George Sarton - 1927 - Isis 9 (1):138-142.
  15. American Indian Languages and American Linguistics. [REVIEW]P. Swiggers - 1981 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43:400.
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  16.  8
    Personal Experiences with Tribal IRBs, Hidden Hegemony of Researchers, and the Need for an Inter-Cultural Approach: Views From an American Indian Researcher.J. Neil Henderson - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):44-51.
    In approximately the last 20 years, the self-protection capacity of many American Indian tribes has significantly increased to include the review of research requests by a tribally based IRB. While these tribal IRBs are trained using a curriculum derived from the Belmont Report, there is need to recognize the cultural specificity of the Belmont Report and its potential for conflict or inappropriateness when applied to populations with deep differences in cultural constructs compared to the majority population. However, recognition (...)
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  17.  26
    The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy.Thomas M. Norton-Smith - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Common themes in American Indian philosophy -- First introductions -- Common themes : a first look -- Constructing an actual American Indian world -- NelsonGoodman's constructivism -- Setting the stage -- Fact, fiction, and feeders -- Ontological pluralism -- True versions and well-made worlds -- Nonlinguistic versions and the advancement of understanding -- True versions and cultural bias -- Constructive realism : variations on a theme by Goodman -- True versions and cultural bias -- An (...) Indian well-made actual world -- Relatedness, native knowledge, and ultimate acceptability -- Native knowledge and relatedness as a world ordering principle -- Native knowledge and truth -- Native knowledge and verification -- Native knowledge and ultimate acceptability -- An expansive conception of persons -- A western conception of persons -- Native conceptions of animate beings and persons -- An American Indian expansive conception of persons -- The semantic potency of performance -- Opening reflections and reminders about performances -- Symbols and their performance -- The Shawnee naming ceremony -- Gifting as a world constructing performance -- Closing remarks about the semantic potency of performances -- Circularity as a world ordering principle -- Goodman briefly revisited -- Time, events, and history or space, place, and nature? -- Circularity as a world ordering principle -- Circularity and sacred places -- Closing remarks about circularity as a world ordering principle -- The dance of person and place -- American Indian philosophy as a dance of person and place -- Consequences, speculations, and closing reflections. (shrink)
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  18.  10
    American Indian Thought.D. D. Hutchins - 2005 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 33 (101):39-42.
  19. American Indian Indigenous Pedagogy.Paula Gunn Allen - 2007 - In Sharan B. Merriam (ed.), Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing. Krieger Pub. Co..
     
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  20.  47
    American Indian Land Ethics.J. Baird Callicott - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (4):438-438.
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  21. The American Indian Movement And.Fayg Cohen - 1976 - In Michael A. Rynkiewich & James P. Spradley (eds.), Ethics and Anthropology: Dilemmas in Fieldwork. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co.. pp. 81.
     
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  22.  52
    American Indian Women's Activism in the 1960s and 1970s.Donna Hightower Langston - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):114 - 132.
    This article will focus on the role of women in three red power events: the occupation of Alcatraz Island, the Fish-in movement, and the occupation at Wounded Knee. Men held most public roles at Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, even though women were the numerical majority at Wounded Knee. Female elders played a significant role at Wounded Knee, where the occupation was originally their idea. In contrast to these two occupations, the public leaders of the Fish-in movement were women-not an untraditional (...)
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  23.  10
    American Indian Languages: A Laboratory for Linguistic Methodology.Paul L. Garvin - 1967 - Foundations of Language 3 (3):257-260.
  24.  18
    American Indian Thought (Review).Donald Grinde - 2005 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (4):863-864.
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  25.  41
    American Indian Women's Activism in the 1960s and 1970s.Donna Hightower-Langston - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):114-132.
    : This article will focus on the role of women in three red power events: the occupation of Alcatraz Island, the Fish-in movement, and the occupation at Wounded Knee. Men held most public roles at Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, even though women were the numerical majority at Wounded Knee. Female elders played a significant role at Wounded Knee, where the occupation was originally their idea. In contrast to these two occupations, the public leaders of the Fish-in movement were women—not an (...)
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  26.  8
    American Indian Women's Activism in the 1960s and 1970s.Donna Hightower Langston - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):114-132.
    This article will focus on the role of women in three red power events: the occupation of Alcatraz Island, the Fish-in movement, and the occupation at Wounded Knee. Men held most public roles at Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, even though women were the numerical majority at Wounded Knee. Female elders played a significant role at Wounded Knee, where the occupation was originally their idea. In contrast to these two occupations, the public leaders of the Fish-in movement were women—not an untraditional (...)
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  27.  13
    American Indian Womenapos;s Activism in the 1960s and 1970s.Donna Hightower Langston - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):114-132.
    This article will focus on the role of women in three red power events: the occupation of Alcatraz Island, the Fish-in movement, and the occupation at Wounded Knee. Men held most public roles at Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, even though women were the numerical majority at Wounded Knee. Female elders played a significant role at Wounded Knee, where the occupation was originally their idea. In contrast to these two occupations, the public leaders of the Fish-in movement were women-not an untraditional (...)
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  28.  1
    American Indian Enterprises and Social Responsibility.Helen Juliette Muller - 2001 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 12:217-227.
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  29.  1
    Integrating American Indian Business in Contemporary Management Education.Helen Juliette Muller - 2003 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 14:428-435.
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  30.  19
    Cultural and Ethical Issues Concerning Research on American Indian Youth.Arlene Rubin Stiffman, Eddie Brown, Catherine Woodstock Striley, Emily Ostmann & Gina Chowa - 2005 - Ethics and Behavior 15 (1):1-14.
    A study of American Indian youths illustrates competing pressures between research and ethics. A stakeholder-researcher team developed three plans to protect participants. The first allowed participants to skip potentially upsetting interview sections. The second called for participants flagged for abuse or suicidality to receive referrals, emergency 24-hr clinical backup, or both. The third, based on the community's desire to promote service access, included giving participants a list of service resources. Interviewers gave referrals to participants flagged as having mild (...)
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  31.  5
    Origin of the American Indian as Suggested by Fray Joseph de Acosta.Saul Jarcho - 1959 - Isis 50 (4):430-438.
  32.  10
    Policy Issues in American Indian Health Governance.Donald Warne - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):42-45.
    Perhaps the most significant law affecting the provision of health services to the American Indian and Alaska Native population is the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975. This Act allows tribes to assume the management and control of health care programs from Indian Health Service and to increase flexibility in health care program development. Under ISDEAA, tribes have the option to contract or compact with IHS to deliver health services using pre-existing IHS resources, third (...)
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  33.  8
    Policy Issues in American Indian Health Governance.Donald Warne - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):42-45.
    Perhaps the most significant law affecting the provision of health services to the American Indian and Alaska Native population is the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975. This Act allows tribes to assume the management and control of health care programs from Indian Health Service and to increase flexibility in health care program development. Under ISDEAA, tribes have the option to contract or compact with IHS to deliver health services using pre-existing IHS resources, third (...)
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  34.  13
    Acquired Duties for Ethical Research With American Indian/Alaska Native Populations: An Application of Pierson and Millum’s Framework.Ibrahim Garba, Leila Barraza & Elizabeth Hall-Lipsy - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (11):40-42.
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  35.  11
    Altered States of Consciousness in North American Indian Ceremonials.Wolfgang G. Jilek - 1982 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 10 (4):326-343.
  36.  25
    An Ecological Turn in American Indian Environmental Ethics.Jonathan Beever - 2015 - Environmental Philosophy 12 (1):1-19.
    In this paper I argue that, instead of standing as an exemplar of contemporary environmentalism, North American Indian voices on the environment offer insights concerning ecological relationships that can be brought to bear on theories of environmental value and the politics of environmentalism. I argue that environmentally orthodox representations of Native views are further complicated by the metaphysics of local ecological knowledge. I then argue that moral ecologism, a normative view focused on inter­dependence throughout the living world and (...)
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  37. A Perpetual Peace: American Indian Treaties and the Environment.M. Rene Johnson - 2003 - Dissertation, Michigan Technological University
    Hasian, Condit, and Lucaites argue that there is "a need for investigating and implementing procedures that would democratize the legal system"i and that the boundaries of the law provide a fruitful site for such investigation. I would argue that one particularly relevant site to recover such procedures is American Indian law. American Indian treaties, although more so in terms of their negotiation rather than their final form, are hybrid documents, combining elements from both indigenous and Western (...)
     
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  38.  28
    What Is American Indian Philosophy? Toward a Critical Indigenous Philosophy.Dale Turner - 2007 - In George Yancey (ed.), Philosophy in Multiple Voices. pp. 197.
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  39.  1
    Violence in North-American Indian Sports Games.Fabrice Delsahut - 2018 - Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence 2 (2).
    North American Indians have often been perceived as violent, bloodthirsty human beings. The horrified fascination exerted by this violence on the European imagination takes hold of all historical accounts and lies at the heart of the smallest social productions. The sports games, whose imposing corpus is intriguing to the colonists, are also perceived as a cultural element of this gratuitous violence, a biological one, even, as inherent to their “wild nature”. And yet, far from being instinctual, this violence takes (...)
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  40.  11
    Ojibwe Persons: Toward a Phenomenology of an American Indian Lifeworld.Theresa S. Smith - 1989 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 20 (2):130-144.
  41.  9
    The Crisis in American Indian and Non-Indian Farming.Theodore E. Downing - 1985 - Agriculture and Human Values 2 (3):18-24.
  42. The Smithsonian and the American Indian: Making a Moral Anthropology in Victorian America.Curtis M. Hinsley & Margaret Humphreys - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (3):363.
     
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  43.  45
    The Incorporation of American Indian Philosophy Into Undergraduate Philosophy Courses.Marilyn Holly - 1992 - Teaching Philosophy 15 (4):349-365.
  44. ""On" Americanizing" the American Indian.Horace M. Kallen - forthcoming - Social Research.
     
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  45.  17
    Fathers and Children. Andrew Jackson and the Subjugation of the American Indian.Lewis Perry & Michael Paul Rogin - 1977 - History and Theory 16 (2):174.
  46. My Elders Taught Me: Aspects of Western Great Lakes American Indian Philosophy.John F. Boatman - 1992 - Upa.
    In this book the author examines various aspects of a selection of Western Great Lakes American Indian philosophical traditions and beliefs. He combines over forty years of stories, anecdotes, and observations learned from Western Great Lakes tribal elders into a coherent and thought-provoking philosophy text which challenges readers to look beyond their own cultural prepossessions and discover a method of asking questions where the answers come from within.
     
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  47.  4
    Wendigos, Eye Killers, Skinwalkers: The Myth of the American Indian Vampire and American Indian “Vampire” Myths.Corinna Lenhardt - 2016 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 6 (1):195-212.
    We all know vampires. Count Dracula and Nosferatu, maybe Blade and Angel, or Stephenie Meyer’s sparkling beau, Edward Cullen. In fact, the Euro-American vampire myth has long become one of the most reliable and bestselling fun-rides the entertainment industries around the world have to offer. Quite recently, however, a new type of fanged villain has entered the mainstream stage: the American Indian vampire. Fully equipped with war bonnets, buckskin clothes, and sharp teeth, the vampires of recent U.S. (...)
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  48. Identity and the Politics of American Indian and Hispanic Women Leaders.Diane-Michele Prindeville - 2003 - Gender and Society 17 (4):591-608.
    This article examines the influence of race/ethnicity and gender identity on the politics of American Indian and Hispanic women leaders. The data are drawn from personal interviews with 50 public officials and grassroots leaders active in state, local, or tribal politics in New Mexico. Borrowing from Tolleson Rinehart's model of “gender consciousness,” the author creates a classification scheme for assessing the role that race/ethnicity and gender play in the political ideology and motives of the leaders. The findings reveal (...)
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  49. The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy.Jerome A. Stone - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (2):80-82.
    The aim of this book is to demonstrate that American Indians have a world-view that is consistent, intelligible, and legitimate. It is a deft and self-aware exemplification of the task of cross-cultural comparison. The overall strategy in the argument is to employ a modified version of Nelson Goodman’s notion of world-making and then construct a simplified model of the American Indian worldview. Norton-Smith accomplishes this difficult task and in the process modifies Goodman in a realist direction, making (...)
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  50.  93
    On the Cosmic Order of Modern Physics and the Conceptual World of the American Indian.Phillip H. Duran - 2007 - World Futures 63 (1):1 – 27.
    Indigenous peoples have for millennia observed and lived in deference to the same universe as scientists who meticulously record and measure information, but their deep knowledge of the natural world remains unacknowledged by the greater society. This article relates some of that knowledge to physics concepts, particularly relativity and quantum theory, as an initial step toward conveying certain realities of the American Indian world into a Western scientific context such that their meaning is not lost. Modern physics has (...)
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