Results for 'assisted death'

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  1.  48
    Mental Illness, Lack of Autonomy, and Physician-Assisted Death.Jukka Varelius - 1st ed. 2015 - In Jukka Varelius & Michael Cholbi (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag. pp. 59-77.
    In this chapter, I consider the idea that physician-assisted death might come into question in the cases of psychiatric patients who are incapable of making autonomous choices about ending their lives. I maintain that the main arguments for physician-assisted death found in recent medical ethical literature support physician-assisted death in some of those cases. After assessing several possible criticisms of what I have argued, I conclude that the idea that physicianassisted death can be (...)
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  2.  44
    Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation.Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism, minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. Brain (...)
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  3.  18
    Two Kinds of Physician‐Assisted Death.Govert den Hartogh - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (9):666-673.
    I argue that the concept ‘physician-assisted suicide’ covers two procedures that should be distinguished: giving someone access to humane means to end his own life, and taking co-responsibility for the safe and effective execution of that plan. In the first section I explain the distinction, in the following sections I show why it is important. To begin with I argue that we should expect the laws that permit these two kinds of ‘assistance’ to be different in their justificatory structure. (...)
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  4. Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Dying?Mary Warnock - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Fundamental principles : the nature of the dispute -- Types of euthanasia -- Psychiatric assisted suicide -- Neonates -- Incompetent adults -- Human life is sacred -- The slippery slope -- Medical views -- Four methods of easing death and their effect on doctors -- Looking further ahead.
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  5.  61
    Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician‐Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, at the (...)
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  6.  21
    A Communitarian Approach to Physician-Assisted Death.Franklin G. Miller - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):78-87.
    The standard argument in favor of the practice of voluntary physician-assisted death, by means of assisted suicide or active euthanasia, rests on liberal, individualistic grounds. It appeals to two moral considerations: personal self-determination—the right to choose the circumstances and timing of death with medical assistance; and individual well-being—relief of intolerable suffering in the face of terminal or incurable, severely debilitating illness. One of the strongest challenges to this argument has been advanced by Daniel Callahan. Callahan has (...)
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  7.  17
    When Slippery Slope Arguments Miss the Mark: A Lesson From One Against Physician-Assisted Death.Eric Blackstone & Stuart J. Youngner - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (10):657-660.
    In 1989, Susan Wolf convincingly warned of a troublesome consequence that should discourage any movement in American society towards physician-assisted death—a legal backlash against the gains made for limiting life-sustaining treatment. The authors demonstrate that this dire consequence did not come to pass. As physician-assisted suicide gains a foothold in USA and elsewhere, many other slippery slope arguments are being put forward. Although many of these speculations should be taken seriously, they do not justify halting the new (...)
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  8.  59
    The Moral Difference or Equivalence Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: Word Games or War Games? [REVIEW]Sam Rys, Reginald Deschepper, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Douglas Atkinson & Johan Bilsen - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):171-183.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical–ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. Some argue that CSD is morally equivalent to physician-assisted death (PAD), that it is a form of “slow euthanasia.” A qualitative thematic content analysis of opinion pieces was conducted to describe and classify arguments that support or reject a moral difference between CSD and (...)
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  9.  26
    Physician‐Assisted Death and Severe, Treatment‐Resistant Depression.Bonnie Steinbock - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):30-42.
    Should people suffering from untreatable psychiatric conditions be eligible for physician-assisted death? This is possible in Belgium and the Netherlands, where PAD for psychiatric conditions is permitted, though rare, so long as the criteria of due care are met. Those opposed to all instances of PAD point to Belgium and the Netherlands as a dark warning that once PAD is legalized, restricting it will prove impossible because safeguards, such as the requirement that a patient be terminally ill, will (...)
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  10.  37
    Medically Assisted Death.Robert Young - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Does a competent person suffering from a terminal illness or enduring an otherwise burdensome existence, who considers his life no longer of value but is incapable of ending it, have a right to be helped to die? Should someone for whom further medical treatment would be futile be allowed to die regardless of expressing a preference to be given all possible treatment? These are some of the questions that are asked and answered in this wide-ranging discussion of both the morality (...)
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  11. Physician-Assisted Death in Perspective: Assessing the Dutch Experience.Stuart J. Youngner & Gerrit K. Kimsma (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive report and analysis of the Dutch euthanasia experience over the last three decades. In contrast to most books about euthanasia, which are written by authors from countries where the practice is illegal and therefore practised only secretly, this book analyzes empirical data and real-life clinical behavior. Its essays were written by the leading Dutch scholars and clinicians who shaped euthanasia policy and who have studied, evaluated and helped regulate it. Some of them have themselves (...)
     
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  12.  14
    Should a Legal Option of Physician-Assisted Death Include Those Who Are "Tired of Life"?Franklin G. Miller - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (3):351-363.
    Recently, Canada’s National Post described in detail the death by lethal injection of a 94-year-old man, living alone, who had multiple medical problems but was not terminally ill. His son helped find a physician willing to administer lethal medication soon after his father told him he “wasn’t planning on adding another digit” to his age. The physician who complied with the request is a leading advocate for assisted death in Canada, who reportedly has been responsible for more (...)
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  13.  15
    Drawing the Line on Physician-Assisted Death.Lynn A. Jansen, Steven Wall & Franklin G. Miller - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (3):190-197.
    Drawing the line on physician assistance in physician-assisted death continues to be a contentious issue in many legal jurisdictions across the USA, Canada and Europe. PAD is a medical practice that occurs when physicians either prescribe or administer lethal medication to their patients. As more legal jurisdictions establish PAD for at least some class of patients, the question of the proper scope of this practice has become pressing. This paper presents an argument for restricting PAD to the terminally (...)
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  14.  14
    Assessment of Physician-Assisted Death by Members of the Public Prosecution in The Netherlands.J. M. Cuperus-Bosma, G. van der Wal, C. W. Looman & P. J. van der Maas - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):8-15.
    OBJECTIVES: To identify the factors that influence the assessment of reported cases of physician-assisted death by members of the public prosecution. DESIGN/SETTING: At the beginning of 1996, during verbal interviews, 12 short case-descriptions were presented to a representative group of 47 members of the public prosecution in the Netherlands. RESULTS: Assessment varied considerably between respondents. Some respondents made more "lenient" assessments than others. Characteristics of the respondents, such as function, personal-life philosophy and age, were not related to the (...)
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  15.  7
    Thinking Epistemically About Gender and Physician Assisted Death.Jessica Adkins - 2018 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (2):197-208.
    Feminists continue to express concerns over the legalization of physician-assisted death. Some worry that women are more likely than men to request PAD due to societal stereotypes and the pressures put on women to be self-sacrificing. Others worry that women will have their requests ignored more often than men because women’s voices are traditionally silenced or disregarded in western culture. Rather than join in the above argument of speculating which way women may be marginalized, I accept PAD as (...)
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  16.  26
    Washington State Initiative 119: The First Public Vote on Legalizing Physician-Assisted Death.Peter M. McGough - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (1):63.
    In the fall of 1991, voters in Washington state were asked to consider a public initiative that sought to legalize physician-assisted death: Initiative 119. Drafted by Washington Citizens for Death with Dignity, the initiative was intended to amend the existing state natural death act in several ways:1) expand the definition of “terminal condition” to include patients in irrevers ible coma or persistent vegetative state;2) specifically name “artificial nutrition and hydration” as life-sustaining medical procedures that could be (...)
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  17.  31
    The New Dutch Law on Legalizing Physician-Assisted Death.Gerrit Kimsma & Evert van Leeuwen - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):445-450.
    On April 10, 2001, after extensive committee deliberations, the Second Chamber of the Dutch Parliament passed a bill that was introduced in August 1999 legalizing physician-assisted death. The bill is officially called It was passed by a majority vote in the Second Chamber of Parliament and was supported by the majority parties constituting the present coalition government (i.e., liberals and socialists). Opposition to the law came mainly from a minority of Christian parties. In this report we explore the (...)
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  18.  65
    The Good Death, Virtue, and Physician-Assisted Death: An Examination of the Hospice Way of Death.Franklin G. Miller - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):92.
    The problem of physician-assisted death, assisted suicide and active euthanasia, has been debated predominantly in the ethically familiar vocabulary of rights, duties, and consequences. Patient autonomy and the right to die with dignity vie with the duty of physicians to heal, but not to kill, and the specter of “the slippery slope” from voluntary euthanasia as a last resort for patients suffering from terminal illness to PAD on demand and mercy killing of “hopeless” incompetent patients. Another dimension (...)
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  19.  14
    Autonomy Trumps All?: A Kantian Critique of Physician-Assisted Death.Hoa Trung Dinh - 2017 - The Australasian Catholic Record 94 (4):466.
    Dinh, Hoa Trung At the forefront of the current debate on 'assisted death' is the autonomy argument. Advocates of assisted death often appeal to respect for autonomy as a trump card that can override all other considerations: the value of human life, the prohibition of killing in the medical tradition, and other social responsibilities. For Kant, who invented the concept of autonomy and regarded it as the manifestation of human dignity, the concept of killing oneself is (...)
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  20.  64
    A Right to Suicide Does Not Entail a Right to Assisted Death.M. Gunderson - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (1):51-54.
    Many people believe that it is permissible for people who are suffering from terminal illnesses to commit suicide or even that such people have a right to commit suicide. Some have also argued that it follows that it is permissible for them, or that they have a right, to use the assistance of another person. First, I assume that it is permissible for a person to commit suicide and ask whether it follows that it is also permissible for the person (...)
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  21.  23
    Altruism and Physician Assisted Death.M. Gunderson & D. J. Mayo - 1993 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):281-295.
    We assume that a statute permitting physician assisted death has been passed. We note that the rationale for the passage of such a statute would be respect for individual autonomy, the avoidance of suffering and the possibility of death with dignity. We deal with two moral issues that will arise once such a law is passed. First, we argue that the rationale for passing an assistance in dying law in the first place provides a justification for assisting (...)
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  22.  40
    Retraction: End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die?L. Verheijde Joseph & Y. Rady Mohamed - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):20-.
    BackgroundBioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die."DiscussionAdvances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for (...)
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  23.  21
    Physician Assisted Death and Hard Choices.D. J. Mayo & M. Gunderson - 1993 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):329-341.
    We argue that after the passage of a physician assisted death law some inequities in the health care system which prevent people from getting the medical care they need will become reasons for choosing assisted death. This raises the issue of whether there is compelling moral reason to change those inequities after the passage of an assisted death law. We argue that the passage of an assisted death law will not create additional (...)
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  24.  6
    End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die?Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):15.
    Background Bioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die." Discussion Advances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body (...)
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  25. Physician-Assisted Death: What Everyone Needs to Know®.Wayne Sumner - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    The issue of physician-assisted death is now firmly on the American public agenda. Already legal in five states, it is the subject of intense public opinion battles across the country. Driven by an increasingly aging population, and a baby boom generation just starting to enter its senior years, the issue is not going to go away anytime soon. In this book L.W. Sumner equips readers with everything they need to know to take a reasoned and informed position in (...)
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  26.  80
    Assisted Death: A Study in Ethics and Law.L. W. Sumner - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    In this timely book L.W. Sumner addresses these issues within the wider context of palliative care for patients in the dying process.
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  27.  21
    On Legalizing Physician‐Assisted Death for Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (4):5-6.
    Last November, soon after Colorado became the latest state to authorize physician-assisted suicide, National Public Radio's The Diane Rehm Show devoted a segment to legalization of “physician assistance in dying,” a label that refers to both physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia. Although the segment initially focused on PAD in the context of terminal illness in general, it wasn't long before PAD's potential application to dementia patients came up. A caller said that her mother had Alzheimer's disease and (...)
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  28.  36
    Assisted Death and Martyrdom.D. C. Thomasma - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):122-142.
    Against the backdrop of ancient, mediaeval and modern Catholic teaching prohibiting killing (the rule against killing), the question of assisted suicide and euthanasia is examined. In the past the Church has modified its initial repugnance for killing by developing specific guidelines for permitting killing under strict conditions. This took place with respect to capital punishment and a just war, for example. One wonders why in the least objectionable instance, when a person is already dying, suffering, and repeatedly requesting assistance (...)
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  29.  31
    Physician-Assisted Death: Doctrinal Development Vs. Christian Tradition.H. T. Engelhardt - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):115-121.
    Physician-assisted suicide offers a moral and theological Rorschach test. Foundational commitments regarding morality and theology are disclosed by how the issue is perceived and by what moral problems it is seen to present. One of the cardinal differences disclosed is that between Western and Orthodox Christian approaches to theology in general, and the theology of dying and suicide in particular. Confrontation with the issue of suicide is likely to bring further doctrinal development in many of the Western Christian religions, (...)
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  30.  27
    Virtuous Motives, Moral Luck, and Assisted Death.Liezl van Zyl - 2004 - South African Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):20-33.
    In this paper I outline a motive-based virtue account of right action, according to which an action is right if it expresses or exhibits virtuous motive, and which defines virtue in terms of human flourishing. I indicate how this account allows us to deal with the problem of consequential luck. By applying this account to the question of whether it is ever morally right or accept able to assist in someone's death, I demonstrate how it also allows us to (...)
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  31.  31
    Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions.Erich H. Loewy - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care makes (...)
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  32.  11
    Physician-Assisted Death: Can Philosophical Bioethics Aid Social Policy?Mark G. Kuczewski - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):339-347.
    The debate regarding physician-assisted suicide continues in our society. Despite the recent opinions of the United States Supreme Court, this issue is unlikely to go away anytime soon. For a variety of reasons, this debate is now conducted in the legalistic terms of individual rights and liberties. As a result, perhaps we philosophers have been left behind. This is now a matter for the legal arena and philosophy is likely to be irrelevant. I would like to suggest otherwise for (...)
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  33. Human Dignity and Assisted Death.Sebastian Muders (ed.) - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    Assisted dying and human dignity are two extremely contested topics in Bioethics. This volume offers the first book-length attempt to bring both together. Its authors develop detailed philosophical analyses of dignity, and how it relates to assisted suicide and euthanasia.
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  34.  32
    Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician-Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
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  35.  7
    Nurses’ Moral Experiences of Assisted Death: A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Research.James Elmore, David Kenneth Wright & Maude Paradis - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (8):955-972.
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  36.  21
    Professional Integrity and Physician‐Assisted Death.Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (3):8-17.
  37.  26
    Justifying Physician-Assisted Death in Organ Donation.Joseph L. Verheijde & Mohamed Y. Rady - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):52-54.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 52-54, August 2011.
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  38. Restricting Physician‐Assisted Death to the Terminally Ill.Martin Gunderson & David J. Mayo - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (6):17-23.
  39.  34
    Physician-Assisted Death with Limited Access to Palliative Care.Joaquín Barutta & Jochen Vollmann - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):652-654.
  40.  19
    Treatment-Resistant Depression and Physician-Assisted Death.Franklin G. MIller - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):885-886.
  41.  52
    What People Close to Death Say About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Qualitative Study.A. Chapple, S. Ziebland, A. McPherson & A. Herxheimer - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):706-710.
    Objective: To explore the experiences of people with a “terminal illness”, focusing on the patients’ perspective of euthanasia and assisted suicide.Method: A qualitative study using narrative interviews was conducted throughout the UK. The views of the 18 people who discussed euthanasia and assisted suicide were explored. These were drawn from a maximum variation sample, who said that they had a “terminal” illness, malignant or non-malignant.Results: That UK law should be changed to allow assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia (...)
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  42.  5
    Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation.Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):491-491.
  43.  77
    Physician-Assisted Death in the United States: Are the Existing "Last Resorts" Enough?Timothy E. Quill - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 17-22.
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  44.  19
    Mental Health Professionals and Assisted Death: Perceived Ethical Obligations and Proposed Guidelines for Practice.James L. Werth Jr - 1999 - Ethics and Behavior 9 (2):159 – 183.
  45.  10
    Physician-Assisted Death in Canada.Alister Browne & J. S. Russell - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):377-383.
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  46.  17
    Collaborated Death: An Exploration of the Swiss Model of Assisted Suicide for Its Potential to Enhance Oversight and Demedicalize the Dying Process.Stephen J. Ziegler - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):318-330.
    Death, like many social problems, has become medicalized. In response to this medicalization, physician-assisted suicide has emerged as one alternative among many at the end of life. And although the practice is currently legal in the states of Oregon and Washington, opponents still argue that PAS is unethical, is inconsistent with a physician's role, and cannot be effectively regulated. In comparison, Switzerland, like Oregon, permits PAS, but unlike Oregon, non-physicians and private organizations play a significant role in (...) death. Could the Swiss model be the answer? The following essay explores the Swiss model of assisted suicide for its potential to enhance the regulation of PAS, reduce physician involvement, and perhaps demedicalize the way we die. (shrink)
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  47.  18
    Physician-Assisted Death Does Not Violate Professional Integrity.Udo Schuklenk & Suzanne van de Vathorst - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):887-888.
  48.  7
    Physician-Assisted Death in Perspective: Assessing the Dutch Experience. Edited by S. J. Youngner and G. K. Kimsma. Cambridge University Press, 2012, 403pp., £62. ISBN: 9781107007567. [REVIEW]Kevin Fitzpatrick - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (4):649-653.
  49.  6
    Truth-Telling and Doctor-Assisted Death as Perceived by Israeli Physicians.Arnona Ziv Baruch Velan, Carmit Rubin Giora Kaplan, Tami Karni Yaron Connelly & Orna Tal - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):13.
    Medicine has undergone substantial changes in the way medical dilemmas are being dealt with. Here we explore the attitude of Israeli physicians to two debatable dilemmas: disclosing the full truth to patients...
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  50.  38
    Hospice and Physician-Assisted Death: Collaboration, Compliance, and Complicity.Courtney S. Campbell & Jessica C. Cox - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (5):26-35.
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