Results for 'assisted reproduction'

1000+ found
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  1.  99
    Embodied Subjects and Fragmented Objects: Women's Bodies, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and the Right to Self-Determination.Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta & Annemiek Richters - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):239-249.
    This article focuses on the transformation of the female reproductive body with the use of assisted reproduction technologies under neo-liberal economic globalisation, wherein the ideology of trade without borders is central, as well as under liberal feminist ideals, wherein the right to self-determination is central. Two aspects of the body in western medicine—the fragmented body and the commodified body, and the integral relation between these two—are highlighted. This is done in order to analyse the implications of local and (...)
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  2.  42
    In Whose Interest? Policy and Politics in Assisted Reproduction.Anne Donchin - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (2):92-101.
    This paper interprets the British legislative process that initiated the first comprehensive national regulation of embryo research and fertility services and examines subsequent efforts to restrain the assisted reproduction industry. After describing and evaluating British regulatory measures, I consider successive failures to control the assisted reproduction industry in the US. I discuss disparities between UK and US regulatory initiatives and their bearing on regulation in other countries. Then I turn to the political and social structures in (...)
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  3.  25
    Assisted Reproduction and Distributive Justice.Vida Panitch - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (2):108-117.
    The Canadian province of Quebec recently amended its Health Insurance Act to cover the costs of In Vitro Fertilization . The province of Ontario recently de-insured IVF. Both provinces cited cost-effectiveness as their grounds, but the question as to whether a public health insurance system ought to cover IVF raises the deeper question of how we should understand reproduction at the social level, and whether its costs should be a matter of individual or collective responsibility. In this article I (...)
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  4.  26
    Toward a Gender-Sensitive Assisted Reproduction Policy.Anne Donchin - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):28-38.
    The recent case of the UK woman who lost her legal struggle to be impregnated with her own frozen embryos, raises critical issues about the meaning of reproductive autonomy and the scope of regulatory practices. I revisit this case within the context of contemporary debate about the moral and legal dimensions of assisted reproduction. I argue that the gender neutral context that frames discussion of regulatory practices is unjust unless it gives appropriate consideration to the different positions women (...)
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  5.  32
    Risk Communication in Assisted Reproduction in Latvia: From Private Experience to Ethical Issues.Signe Mezinska & Ilze Mileiko - 2013 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 6 (2):79-96.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze the process of risk communication in the context of assisted reproduction in Latvia. The paper is based on a qualitative methodology and two types of data: media analysis and 30 semi-structured interviews (11 patients, 4 egg donors, 15 experts). The study explores a broad definition of risk communication and explores three types of risks: health, psychosocial, and moral. We ask (1), who is involved in risk communication, (2), how risks are (...)
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  6.  15
    Natural Versus Assisted Reproduction: In Search of Fairness.Daniela Cutas & Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 4 (1).
    In this paper, we are concerned with the ethical implications of the distinction between natural reproduction and reproduction that requires assistance. We argue that the current practice of enforcing regulations on the latter but not on the former means of reproduction is ethically unjustified. It is not defensible to tolerate parental ignorance or abuse in natural reproduction and subsequently in natural parenting, whilst submitting assisted reproduction and parenting to invasive scrutiny. Our proposal is to (...)
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  7.  38
    A Woman's Choice? On Women, Assisted Reproduction and Social Coercion.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):81 - 90.
    This paper critically discusses an argument that is sometimes pressed into service in the ethical debate about the use of assisted reproduction. The argument runs roughly as follows: we should prevent women from using assisted reproduction techniques, because women who want to use the technology have been socially coerced into desiring children - and indeed have thereby been harmed by the patriarchal society in which they live. I call this the argument from coercion. Having clarified this (...)
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  8.  14
    Assisted Reproduction: A Comparative Review of IVF Policies in Two Pro-Natalist Countries. [REVIEW]Ekaterina Balabanova & Frida Simonstein - 2010 - Health Care Analysis 18 (2):188-202.
    Policies on reproduction have become an increasingly important tool for governments seeking to meet the so-called demographic ‘challenge’ created by the combination of low fertility and lengthening life expectancies. However, the tension between the state and the market in health care is present in all countries around the world due to the scare resources available and the understandable importance of the health issues. The field of assisted reproduction, as part of the health care system, is affected by (...)
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  9.  18
    A Woman's Choice? – On Women, Assisted Reproduction and Social Coercion.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):81-90.
    This paper critically discusses an argument that is sometimes pressed into service in the ethical debate about the use of assisted reproduction. The argument runs roughly as follows: we should prevent women from using assisted reproduction techniques, because women who want to use the technology have been socially coerced into desiring children - and indeed have thereby been harmed by the patriarchal society in which they live. I call this the argument from coercion. Having clarified this (...)
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  10.  22
    Assisted Reproduction: Managing an Unruly Technology. [REVIEW]Mairi Levitt - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (1):41-49.
    Technology is “unruly” because it operates in a social context where it is shaped by institutions, organisations and individuals in ways not envisaged when it was first developed. In the UK assisted reproductive technology has developed from strictly circumscribed beginnings as a treatment for infertility within the NHS, to a service which is more often offered by commercial clinics and purchased by clients who are not necessarily infertile. The article considers the process by which assisted reproductive technology has (...)
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  11.  1
    Assisted Reproduction and Justice: Threats to a New Model in a Low‐ and Middle‐Income Country.David R. Hall & Gerhard Hanekom - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  12. On Procreative Responsibility in Assisted and Collaborative Reproduction.Melissa Seymour Fahmy - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):55-70.
    Abstract It is common practice to regard participants in assisted and collaborative reproduction (gamete donors, embryologists, fertility doctors, etc.) as simply providing a desired biological product or medical service. These agents are not procreators in the ordinary sense, nor do they stand in any kind of meaningful parental relation to the resulting offspring. This paper challenges the common view by defending a principle of procreative responsibility and then demonstrating that this standard applies as much to those who provide (...)
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  13.  80
    Natural Versus Assisted Reproduction. In Search of Fairness.Daniela Cutas & Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - Studies in Ethics, Law and Technology 4 (1).
    Whilst the choice of becoming a parent in the natural way is unregulated all over Europe (and proposals of regulation raise vehement objections), most European countries have (either legal or professional) regulations imposing criteria that people must satisfy if they wish to gain access to assisted reproduction and parenting. These criteria may include relationship status, age, sexual orientation, financial stability, health, and willingness to attend parenting classes. The existence of regulations in this area is largely accepted, and the (...)
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  14.  11
    Expanding the Use of Posthumous Assisted Reproduction Technique: Should the Deceased’s Parents Be Allowed to Use His Sperm?Efrat Ram-Tiktin, Roy Gilbar, Ronit B. Fruchter, Ido Ben-Ami, Shevach Friedler & Einat Shalom-Paz - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 14 (1):18-25.
    The posthumous retrieval and use of gametes is socially, ethically, and legally controversial. In the countries that do not prohibit the practice, posthumous assisted reproduction is usually permitted only at the request of the surviving spouse and only when the deceased left written consent. This paper presents the recommendations of an ethics committee established by the Israeli Fertility Association. In its discussions, the committee addressed the ethical considerations of posthumous use of sperm—even in the absence of written consent (...)
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  15.  21
    The Doctor's Dilemma: Paternalisms in the Medicolegal History of Assisted Reproduction and Abortion.Kara W. Swanson - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (2):312-325.
    This article analyzes the comparative history of the law and practice of abortion and assisted reproduction in the United States to consider the interplay between medical paternalism and legal paternalism. It supplements existing critiques of paternalism as harmful to women's equality with the medical perspective, as revealed through the writings of Alan F. Guttmacher, to consider when legal regulation might be warranted.
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  16.  11
    Solidarity as a Theoretical Framework for Posthumous Assisted Reproduction and the Case of Bereaved Parents.Efrat Ram-Tiktin & Roy Gilbar - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (2):501-517.
    Bioethicists, medical professionals and lawyers who support Posthumous Assisted Reproduction as an ethical procedure in the case of the deceased’s spouse often oppose it in the case of the deceased’s parents. In addition, supporters of PAR usually rely on an individualistic version of liberalism, thus focusing on a personal rather than relational approach to autonomy. This article proposes an alternative and comprehensive theoretical framework for the practice of PAR, based on the concepts of solidarity and relational autonomy. By (...)
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  17.  13
    Regulating Assisted Reproduction: Discrimination and the Right to Privacy.Joshua Shaw - 2019 - Clinical Ethics 14 (2):87-93.
    Advances in fertility medicine have led some ethicists to call for stricter regulations on assisted reproduction. One counterargument is that such restrictions are unfair, for they impose far more...
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  18.  11
    Conflicts of Interest and Effective Oversight of Assisted Reproduction Using Donated Oocytes.Valarie K. Blake, Michelle L. McGowan & Aaron D. Levine - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (2):410-424.
    Oocyte donation raises conflicts of interest and commitment for physicians but little attention has been paid to how to reduce these conflicts in practice. Yet the growing popularity of assisted reproduction has increased the stakes of maintaining an adequate oocyte supply and minimizing conflicts. A growing body of professional guidelines, legal challenges to professional self-regulation, and empirical research on the practice of oocyte donation all call for renewed attention to the issue. As empirical findings better inform existing conflicts (...)
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  19.  24
    Getting Beyond the Welfare of the Child in Assisted Reproduction.B. Solberg - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):373-376.
    The welfare of the child is the prevailing principle and concern regarding access to assisted reproduction in Western countries today, and there is a wish to avoid harm to future children. New research fields have developed in order to provide scientific evidence on the welfare of children living with different “types” of parents. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) seems to be heading in a responsible direction where the care and concern for future children is vital. However, the claim (...)
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  20.  7
    Is Age the Limit for Human-Assisted Reproduction Techniques? 'Yes', Said an Italian Judge.M. Gulino, A. Pacchiarotti, G. Montanari Vergallo & P. Frati - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):250-252.
    Although use of assisted reproduction techniques was examined by an ad hoc act in 2004 in Italy, there are many opposing views about ethical and economic implications of the technologies dealing with infertility and sterility problems. In this paper, the authors examine a recent judge's decision that ordered the removal and subsequent adoption of a 1-year-old child because her parents were considered too old to be parents. The couple had had recourse to heterologous artificial insemination abroad and decided (...)
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  21.  9
    Bioethical Dilemmas of Assisted Reproduction in the Opinions of Polish Women in Infertility Treatment: A Research Report.A. Dembinska - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):731-734.
    Infertility Accepted treatment is replete with bioethical dilemmas regarding the limits of available medical therapies. Poland has no legal acts regulating the ethical problems associated with infertility treatment and work on such legislation has been in progress for a long time, arousing very intense emotions in Polish society. The purpose of the present study was to find out what Polish women undergoing infertility treatment think about the most disputable and controversial bioethical problems of assisted reproduction. An Attitudes towards (...)
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  22.  3
    Social impact of the results of the Service of Assisted Reproduction of Low Complexity of Camagüey.Orisel del Carmen Rodríguez Abalo, Lorena Morales Tarajano, Mailet Morales Tarajano & Gilberto Méndez Guerrero - 2019 - Humanidades Médicas 19 (1):1-15.
    RESUMEN Introducción: El mundo enfrenta un acelerado envejecimiento poblacional y tasas de fecundidad por debajo de los niveles de reemplazo, situación a la que no son ajenos la población y el servicio de Salud cubanos. Objetivo: Valorar las implicaciones sociales de los resultados del Servicio Provincial de Reproducción Asistida de Baja Complejidad de Camagüey, durante el bienio 2016-2017, dados en el incremento del número de embarazos logrados por Estimulación Ovárica Controlada e Inseminación Intrauterina. Métodos: En la contribución se emplearon los (...)
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  23.  5
    Access to Medically Assisted Reproduction for Legal Persons: Possible?Karolína Nováková & Hana Konečná - 2018 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 8 (1-2):109-120.
    Along with the rapid growth that the field of assisted reproduction has experienced over the last few years, numerous ethical issues have arisen and need to be discussed thoroughly. One of them is the limitation of access to assisted reproduction techniques. Because no one should be discriminated against, it is essential to substantiate every single refusal of access carefully. The criterion of welfare of the child is used most frequently. In this paper, we propose a thought (...)
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  24.  16
    Lessons From Latin America: A Commentary of Florencia Luna, "Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America".Allison B. Wolf - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):28-34.
    Florencia Luna begins her essay, “Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America,” by saying: “I want to explore a new way to think about Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in the Latin American context.” I think she clearly achieves that objective. I want to suggest that she does more than this, however. In addition to revealing how traditional depictions of infertility in the United States and Europe are anachronistic for Latin America, her analysis offers feminist (...)
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  25.  12
    Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings.Cristina Richie - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):179-190.
    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. After exploring (...)
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  26.  19
    The New Italian Law on Assisted Reproduction Technology (Law 40/2004).V. Fineschi - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (9):536-539.
    The Italian parliament passed the law on assisted reproduction after a heated debate. The promulgation of this law (Law 40/2004) is the end point of a long and troubled journey that has seen many bills come and go, all of which have failed. The law consists of a whole set of regulations that will have a great impact on health and on society in general. The law is against many of the technical practices of assisted reproduction; (...)
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  27.  7
    A Buyer's Market? Fixing the Price for Human Ova for Assisted Reproduction.Sandra H. Johnson - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (6):9-10.
    The Wall Street Journal article “Putting a Price on a Human Egg” triggered extensive media coverage of a rather unusual challenge to payments made to women providing ova for use in assisted reproduction. In Kamakahi v. American Society for Reproductive Medicine and Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies, plaintiffs claim that ASRM and SART policies adopting limits on such payments violate the federal antitrust prohibition against price fixing.In 2007, an ASRM Ethics Committee Report, confirming a 2000 report, asserted (...)
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  28.  16
    On a Romanian Attempt to Legislate on Medically Assisted Human Reproduction.Daniela Cutas - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (1):56–63.
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  29.  16
    Current and Future Issues in Assisted Reproduction.LeRoy Walters - 1996 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):383-387.
    The last quarter of the twentieth century has given rise to reproductive technologies and arrangements that in the earlier part of the century could only be dreamed of by the authors of science fiction. We stand in the middle of this reproductive revolution, trying to cope with the developments that have already occurred but with an uneasy sense that the future may be even more complicated ethically than the past and the present. In this brief essay, I will survey recent (...)
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  30.  76
    Is ‘Assisted ReproductionReproduction?Monika Piotrowska - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (270):138-157.
    With an increasing number of ways to ‘assist’ reproduction, some bioethicists have started to wonder what it takes to become a genetic parent. It is widely agreed that sharing genes is not enough to substantiate the parent–offspring relation, but what is? Without a better understanding of the concept of reproduction, our thinking about parent–offspring relations and the ethical issues surrounding them risk being unprincipled. Here, I address that problem by offering a principled account of reproduction—the Overlap, Development (...)
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  31.  33
    Genome Editing and Assisted Reproduction: Curing Embryos, Society or Prospective Parents?Giulia Cavaliere - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):215-225.
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  32.  4
    From the Middle Ages to the 21st Century. Abortion, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and LGBT Rights in Argentina.Florencia Luna - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 1 (2):26-36.
    Despite "progressive" legislative changes concerning the LGBT collective and assisted reproductive technologies in Argentina, women and their sexual and reproductive rights have been overlooked. This article presents a critical perspective of some of these legislative modifications in the country. It addresses why some legislators and society are prepared to challenge a conservative or traditional approach for certain groups while ignoring others. Several factors are at play. There is no all-inclusive explanation. I stress that a striking double standard prevails in (...)
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  33. Assisted Reproduction: Historical Background.E. Chelo - 2001 - Global Bioethics 14 (2-3):69-74.
    It is now possible to have a child without sexual intercourse. The history of this apparently new statement has been breefly synthetised.The new perspectives open ethical problems for the scientific community and a new social context for single women.
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  34.  23
    The Wrongness of Third-Party Assisted Reproduction: A Natural Law Account.Melissa Moschella - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (2):104-121.
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  35.  8
    Mitochondrial Transfer: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in Assisted Reproduction.Alexandra Reznichenko, Carin Huyser & Michael S. Pepper - 2015 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 8 (2):32.
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  36.  3
    [Book Review] the Ethics and Economics of Assisted Reproduction, the Cost of Longing. [REVIEW]Maura A. Ryan - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (5):43-45.
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  37.  11
    At Law: Regulating Assisted Reproduction.Rebecca Dresser - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (6):26.
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  38.  24
    Framing the Ethical and Legal Issues of Human Artificial Gametes in Research, Therapy, and Assisted Reproduction: A German Perspective.Barbara Advena‐Regnery, Hans‐Georg Dederer, Franziska Enghofer, Tobias Cantz & Thomas Heinemann - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):314-326.
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  39.  10
    [Book Review] Surrogates & Other Mothers, the Debates Over Assisted Reproduction[REVIEW]Ruth Macklin - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):476-477.
  40.  59
    Book Review: Mundy L 2008: Everything Conceivable: How Assisted Reproduction is Changing Men, Women, and the World. New York, NY: Anchor Books. 412 Pp. USD15.95 . ISBN: 9781400095377. [REVIEW]C. Kaplan - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (2):256-257.
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  41.  7
    An Ethical Analysis of Assisted Reproduction Providers’ Websites in Pakistan.Ayesha Irshad & Gabriele Werner-Felmayer - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):497-504.
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  42.  18
    Richer Views of the Ethics of ReproductionMaking Babies, Making FamiliesThe Ethics and Economics of Assisted Reproduction.Paul Lauritzen, Mary Lyndon Shanley & Maura A. Ryan - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (5):43.
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  43.  14
    Pursuing Parenthood: Ethical Issues in Assisted Reproduction.Paul Lauritzen & Mary Anne Warren - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (2):164-166.
  44.  5
    Pursuing Parenthood: Ethical Issues in Assisted Reproduction.Paul Lauritzen - 1995 - Ethics 105 (2):428-430.
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  45.  15
    Balancing Animal Welfare and Assisted Reproduction: Ethics of Preclinical Animal Research for Testing New Reproductive Technologies.Verna Jans, Wybo Dondorp, Ellen Goossens, Heidi Mertes, Guido Pennings & Guido de Wert - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (4):537-545.
  46.  63
    Key Changes in the Regulation of Assisted Reproduction Introduced by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008.S. Fovargue & J. Miola - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (4):162-166.
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  47. The'Art'of Medically Assisted Reproduction: An Embryo Is an Embryo Is an Embro.Michael E. McClure - 1996 - In David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (eds.), Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 35--49.
     
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  48. Assisted Reproduction, Prenatal Testing, and Sex Selection.Laura Purdy - 1006 - In Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.), A Companion to Bioethics. Blackwell.
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  49. Bioethics and the New Assisted Reproduction.Laura Purdy - unknown - Encyclopedia of Life Sciences.
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  50. Brave New Children-Assisted Reproduction and Our Concern for the Child.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 1999 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 34:77-98.
     
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