Results for 'asylum'

311 found
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  1.  22
    Asylum, Credible Fear Tests, and Colonial Violence.Elena Ruíz & Ezgi Sertler - manuscript
    A credible fear test is an in-depth interview process given to undocumented people of any age arriving at a U.S. port of entry to determine qualification for asylum-seeking. Credible fear tests as a typical immigration procedure demonstrate not only what structural epistemic violence looks like but also how this violence lives in and through the design of asylum policy. Key terms of credible fear tests such as “significant possibility,” “evidence,” “consistency,” and “credibility” can never be neutral in the (...)
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  2. Victims of Trafficking, Reproductive Rights, and Asylum.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2016 - Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics.
    My aim is to extend and complement the arguments that others have already made for the claim that women who are citizens of economically disadvantaged states and who have been trafficked into sex work in economically advantaged states should be considered candidates for asylum. Familiar arguments cite the sexual violence and forced labor that trafficked women are subjected to along with their well-founded fear of persecution if they’re repatriated. What hasn’t been considered is that reproductive rights are also at (...)
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  3.  28
    Psychiatric Ethics and a Politics of Compassion: The Case of Detained Asylum Seekers in Australia.Deborah Zion, Linda Briskman & Bebe Loff - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):67-75.
    Australia has one of the harshest regimes for the processing of asylum seekers, people who have applied for refugee status but are still awaiting an answer. It has received sharp rebuke for its policies from international human rights bodies but continues to exercise its resolve to protect its borders from those seeking protection. One means of doing so is the detention of asylum seekers who arrive in Australia by boat. Health care providers who care for asylum seekers (...)
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  4. A Liberal Theory of Asylum.Andy Lamey - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):235-257.
    Hannah Arendt argued that refugees pose a major problem for liberalism. Most liberal theorists endorse the idea of human rights. At the same time, liberalism takes the existence of sovereign states for granted. When large numbers of people petition a liberal state for asylum, Arendt argued, these two commitments will come into conflict. An unwavering respect for human rights would mean that no refugee is ever turned away. Being sovereign, however, allows states to control their borders. States supposedly committed (...)
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  5.  29
    Women’s Right to Asylum: Protecting the Rights of Female Asylum Seekers in Europe? [REVIEW]Jane Freedman - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):413-433.
    Criticisms have been made against international laws and conventions on asylum and refugees, arguing that these have been based on a male model of definition, which have ignored women’s persecutions. This article will argue that recent developments in European asylum policy have the potential to deepen this discrimination and to further reduce the rights of female asylum seekers. Although there have been some positive developments in jurisprudence that have recognised that gender-specific persecution may be the basis for (...)
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  6.  20
    The Refugee Qualification Problems in LGBT Asylum Cases.Laurynas Biekša - 2011 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 18 (4):1555-1565.
    In 2011 there are 76 countries of the world still criminalising same-sex sexual acts between consenting adults. In seven of those countries homosexual acts are punishable with death penalty (i.e., Mauritania, Sudan, the northern states of Nigeria, the southern parts of Somalia, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen). Homophobic (transphobic) attitudes are also frequent in many societies. However, the LGBT asylum seekers are frequently left outside the refugee definition due to many refugee qualification problems in LGBT cases. Therefore, in this article (...)
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  7.  14
    Measuring Common Standards and Equal Responsibility Sharing in EU Asylum Outcome Data.Luc Bovens, Chlump Chatkupt & Laura Smead - 2012 - European Union Politics 13 (1):70-93.
    We construct novel measures to assess (i) the extent to which European Union member states are using common standards in recognizing asylum seekers and (ii) the extent to which the responsibilities for asylum applications, acceptances and refugee populations are equally shared among the member states, taking into account population size, gross domestic product (GDP) and GDP expressed in purchasing power parity (GDP-PPP). We track the progression of these measures since the implementation of the Treaty of Amsterdam (1999). These (...)
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  8.  39
    Procedural Problems in LGBT Asylum Cases.Lyra Jakulevičienė, Laurynas Biekša & Eglė Samuchovaitė - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (1):195-207.
    In 2012 there are 76 countries of the world still criminalising same-sex sexual acts between consenting adults. In seven of those countries homosexual acts are punishable with death penalty (i. e., Mauritania, Sudan, the northern states of Nigeria, the southern parts of Somalia, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Yemen). Homophobic (transphobic) attitudes are also frequent in many societies. However, the LGBT asylum seekers are frequently left outside the refugee definition due to many refugee qualification and procedural problems in LGBT cases. (...)
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  9.  69
    Asylum Seekers and Human Rights.John Edwards - 2001 - Res Publica 7 (2):159-182.
    Asylum seekers, by their very circumstances, test our common assumptions and practice in relation to human rights. The treatment of asylum seekers in many European countries has become harsher, more restrictive and less tolerant in recent years, raising questions about the violation of their rights. The article examines the bases of the rights that asylum seekers do have and whether these are best supported as human rights or more limited rights that attach to the place of their (...)
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  10.  38
    Protection under the European Convention on Human Rights – Oasis for Asylum Seekers in Europe?Lyra Jakulevičienė & Vladimiras Siniovas - 2013 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 20 (3):855-899.
    Even though the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR) does not explicitly address the rights of asylum seekers and refugees, the case law of the European Human Rights Court (ECtHR) confirms that their rights can be successfully defended under this mechanism. In parallel, in its evolving jurisprudence on asylum the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) refers to the Strasbourg case law, where there is a certain interrelationship between these two jurisdictions, (...)
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  11.  26
    Lessons of the First EU Court of Justice Judgments in Asylum Cases.Lyra Jakulevičienė - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (2):477-505.
    Starting from 2009, national courts of the EU Member States for the first time gained a “real” right to request the EU Court of Justice for preliminary rulings in asylum matters. First judgments of this Court demonstrate equivocal tendencies: some are blaming the Court for incompetence in asylum matters, others believe that the adoption of authoritative decisions at the European level will assist in developing consistent practice of applying asylum law in the European Union, something that failed (...)
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  12.  25
    “We Cannot Claim Any Particular Knowledge of the Ways of Homosexuals, Still Less of Iranian Homosexuals …”: The Particular Problems Facing Those Who Seek Asylum on the Basis of Their Sexual Identity. [REVIEW]Barry O’Leary - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):87-95.
    Many lesbians and gay men apply for asylum in the U.K. each year on the basis that they fear persecution in their home country because of their sexual orientation. The legal basis for claiming asylum on the ground of sexual identity is now well established. Nevertheless, making these claims remains very difficult for applicants. Western cultural expectations around sexual identity often mix with homophobic assumptions about sexual behaviour to present applicants as “not sufficiently gay”. Furthermore, applicants may not (...)
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  13.  22
    Problems of Application of Detention of Asylum Seekers in the Practice of the Supreme Administrative Court of Lithuania.Laurynas Biekša & Eglė Samuchovaitė - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (4):1407-1422.
    The question of detention of asylum seekers is specific due to the special situation of detainees (persons who have experienced human rights violations and apply for asylum in receiving country) and due to peculiarities of detention itself (persons have not committed crimes, but come or stay illegally because they have been forced to do so by fleeing from human rights violations). Therefore, lately it raises many discussions at the European level. Sooner or later, discussions influence national laws, as (...)
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  14.  18
    Asylum Law or Criminal Law: Blame, Deterrence and the Criminalisation of the Asylum.Paresh Kathrani - 2011 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 18 (4):1543-1554.
    Although the Refugee Convention 1951 generally provided that contracting states should recognise those who came within its definition as refugees, it did not prescribe how contracting states should determine this in order to enable them to balance this obligation with their national interests. However, evidence from the background and drafting of the Refugee Convention 1951 suggests that the provisions that a contracting states would implement in order to protect its interests would be commensurate with the human rights spirit of the (...)
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  15.  16
    Asylum Legal Framework and Policy of the Slovak Republic.Lucia Hurná - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (4):1383-1405.
    After the establishment of the independent Slovak Republic, legal and institutional ground rules were set for providing asylum to foreigners present on the territory of the Slovak Republic. The national legislation of the last twenty years was adopted in compliance with international treaties and the European Union instruments covering asylum matters. In the field of asylum policy, the Slovak Republic complies with its traditional pillars and supports new forms of protection following the new challenges faced by the (...)
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  16.  32
    Gang-Related Asylum Claims: An Overview and Prescription.Matthew J. Lister - 2008 - University of Memphis Law Review 38 (4).
    Over the last several years asylum cases relating to activities of criminal gangs have greatly increased in frequency. Cases involving Central American gangs, the so-called maras, have attracted the most attention but similar cases have arisen out of South Eastern and Eastern Europe as well. Applicants in such cases face a number of difficulties as their cases do not fit into paradigm categories for asylum claims. These cases almost always involve non-state actors, for example, acting for reasons that (...)
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  17.  12
    Women and Asylum: A Particular Social Group. [REVIEW]Sue Kirvan - 1999 - Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):333-342.
    This note examines the judgement of the House of Lords in the cases of Islam andShah, particularly with regard to their conclusion that women in Pakistan who were victims of domestic violence and not protected by their state could qualify as members of a particular social group under the Geneva Convention, and therefore attain refugee status. The note considers the Refugee Women's Legal Group's Gender Guidelines for the Determination of Asylum Claims in the U.K. and discusses the problems faced (...)
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  18.  3
    On Beginning with Justice: Bioethics, Advocacy and the Rights of Asylum Seekers.Deborah Zion - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):890-895.
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  19.  78
    The Ethics and Politics of Asylum: Liberal Democracy and the Response to Refugees.Matthew J. Gibney - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Asylum has become a highly charged political issue across developed countries, raising a host of difficult ethical and political questions. What responsibilities do the world's richest countries have to refugees arriving at their borders? Are states justified in implementing measures to prevent the arrival of economic migrants if they also block entry for refugees? Is it legitimate to curtail the rights of asylum seekers to maximize the number of refugees receiving protection overall? This book draws upon political and (...)
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  20. Asylum for Sale: A Market Between States That is Feasible and Desirable.Johannes Himmelreich - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (2):217-232.
    The asylum system faces problems on two fronts. States undermine it with populist politics, and migrants use it to satisfy their migration preferences. To address these problems, asylum services should be commodified. States should be able to pay other states to provide determination and protection-elsewhere. In this article, I aim to identify a way of implementing this idea that is both feasible and desirable. First, I sketch a policy proposal for a commodification of asylum services. Then, I (...)
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  21.  14
    The Ethics of Discharging Asylum Seekers to Harm: A Case From Australia.Ryan Essex & David Isaacs - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):39-44.
    In February 2016 a twelve-month-old asylum seeker, who came to be know as Baby Asha, was transferred from Nauru and hospitalized in Brisbane. This case came to public attention after Doctors refused to discharge Asha as she would have been returned to detention on Nauru. What in other circumstances would have been considered routine clinical care, quickly turned into an act of civil disobedience. This paper will discuss the ethical aspects of this case, along with its implications for clinicians (...)
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  22.  19
    Ethical and Professional Considerations Providing Medical Evaluation and Care to Refugee Asylum Seekers.Ramin Asgary & Clyde L. Smith - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):3-12.
    A significant number of asylum seekers who largely survived torture live in the United States. Asylum seekers have complex social and medical problems with significant barriers to health care access. When evaluating and providing care for survivors, health providers face important challenges regarding medical ethics and professional codes. We review ethical concerns in regard to accountability, the patient?physician relationship, and moral responsibilities to offer health care irrespective of patient legal status; competing professional responsibility toward society and the judiciary (...)
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  23.  10
    The Institution of Gender-Based Asylum and Epistemic Injustice: A Structural Limit.Ezgi Sertler - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (3).
    One of the recent attempts to explore epistemic dimensions of forced displacement focuses on the institution of gender-based asylum and hopes to detect forms of epistemic injustice within assessments of gender related asylum applications. Following this attempt, I aim in this paper to demonstrate how the institution of gender-based asylum is structured to produce epistemic injustice at least in the forms of testimonial injustice and contributory injustice. This structural limit becomes visible when we realize how the institution (...)
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  24.  29
    Returning to History: The Ethics of Researching Asylum Seeker Health in Australia.Deborah Zion, Linda Briskman & Bebe Loff - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):48-56.
    Australia's policy of mandatory indefinite detention of those seeking asylum and arriving without valid documents has led to terrible human rights abuses and cumulative deterioration in health for those incarcerated. We argue that there is an imperative to research and document the plight of those who have suffered at the hands of the Australian government and its agents. However, the normal tools available to those engaged in health research may further erode the rights and well being of this population, (...)
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  25.  37
    Care or Collusion in Asylum Seeker Detention.Linda Briskman, Deborah Zion & Bebe Loff - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (1):37-55.
    This paper explores ethical questions arising from the work of health practitioners in immigration detention centres in Australia. It raises questions about the roles of professional disciplines and the ways in which they confront dual loyalty issues. The exploration is guided by interviews conducted with health professionals who have worked in asylum seeker detention and an examination of the outsider advocacy role undertaken by the social work profession. The paper discusses the stance taken by individuals and professional associations on (...)
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  26. Is There a Right to Have Rights? The Case of the Right of Asylum.Stefan Heuser - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):3-13.
    In dialogue with the political philosophy of Hannah Arendt and Seyla Benhabib the author draws on the idea of a right to have rights and raises the question under which political conditions asylum can be a subjective right for political refugees. He argues that mere spontaneous acts of humanitarianism will not suffice to define the institutional commitments of liberal democracies in refugee policy. At the same time, no duty for any particular state to take up refugees can be derived (...)
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  27.  45
    Pathological Withdrawl of Refugee Children Seeking Asylum in Sweden.Ian Hacking - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):309-317.
    Between 2001 and 2006 there was an ‘epidemic’ of complete withdrawal from daily life among numerous children in refugee families seeking asylum in Sweden. It became embedded in many distinct controversies, including the politics of immigration, and acrimonious disagreements between pediatricians dealing with individual families, and government-employed sociologists commissioned to report on what was going on. Most of the cases resolved themselves when an amnesty was agreed in 2006, although there remain many doubts about the statistics. After describing this (...)
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  28.  1
    Women Asylum Seekers in the Current Crisis: A Conversation.Harriet Samuels - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (1):99-122.
    To mark International Women’s Day the Research Group for Law, Gender and Sexuality at Westminster Law School held an evening conversation on 10 March 2016 on Women and Asylum. Speakers working in different areas of the asylum system shared their insights and experiences with an audience of staff, students, activists and other visitors. Harriet Samuels chaired the conversation and the speakers were Princess Chine Onyeukwu, Debora Singer, Priya Solanki and Zoe Harper. This article is an edited extract from (...)
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  29.  18
    Inventing the Medical Portrait: Photography at the 'Benevolent Asylum' of Holloway, C. 1885–1889.Susan Sidlauskas - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (1):29-37.
    In 1885, Holloway Sanatorium, an asylum for the ‘mentally afflicted of the middle classes’ opened in Egham, Surrey, 20 miles outside London. Until 1910, photographs of about a third of the patients—both those ‘Certified Lunatic by Inquisition’ and the ‘Voluntary Boarders’ who admitted themselves—were pasted into the asylum's case books. This paper analyses the photographs that were included in the very first of these, when there was a great uncertainty as to how to represent these patients, or whether (...)
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  30.  17
    Can the Welfare State Justify Restrictive Asylum Policies? A Critical Approach.Clara Sandelind - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (2):331-346.
    Liberal egalitarians tend to be committed both to generous asylum policies and generous, universal welfare states. Yet there may be political, social and economic reasons why there is a conflict in realising both. Asylum seekers may create economic pressures to the welfare state, or undermine national solidarity supposedly necessary to support redistribution. In this paper, I discuss how political theorists should approach these empirical concerns. I take issue with the view that theorists can simply move between ‘realism’ and (...)
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  31.  19
    Transnational Violence Against Asylum-Seeking Women and Children: Honduras and the United States-Mexico Border.Cinthya Alberto & Mariana Chilton - 2019 - Human Rights Review 20 (2):205-227.
    Corrupt political institutions, lack of resources, and gang violence in Central America fuel the influx of asylum-seeking women and children to the United States. Yet, immigrant women and children are still at risk for poor health and violence in the US due to the lack of protection and support. Through a case study of a teenage girl from Honduras living in the US who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend who followed her to the US, we elucidate ways in which (...)
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  32.  41
    Standing Up for the Medical Rights of Asylum Seekers.R. E. Ashcroft - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (3):125-126.
    When denial of medical treatment is being used as a lever to move people out of the country, ethicists and healthcare professionals should speak out.An ugly feature of political life throughout the Western world, and beyond, is the suspicion towards, and maltreatment of, migrants from poor to rich countries. People who would otherwise be horrified at being labelled racist nevertheless find it acceptable to support practices which can range from stigmatisation to confinement in brutalising conditions in “reception” and “removal” centres.1–5An (...)
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  33.  19
    Mechanisms of Moral Disengagement in the Endorsement of Asylum Seeker Policies in Australia.Elizabeth M. Greenhalgh, Susan E. Watt & Nicola S. Schutte - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (6):482-499.
    Moral disengagement is a process whereby the self-regulatory mechanisms that would otherwise sanction unethical conduct can be selectively disabled. The present research proposed that moral disengagement might be adopted in the endorsement of asylum seeker policies in Australia, and in order to test this, a scale was developed and was validated in two studies. Factor analysis demonstrated that a 2-factor, 16-item structure had the best fit, and the construct validity of the scale was supported. Results provide evidence for the (...)
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  34.  8
    Science and the Common Good: Indefinite, Non-Reviewable Mandatory Detention of Asylum Seekers and the Research Imperative.Zachary Steel & Derrick Silove - 2004 - Monash Bioethics Review 23 (4):93-103.
    Despite a strong historical record of resettling and providing care for refugee populations, the Australian Federal Government has increasingly implemented harsh and restrictive policies regarding the treatment and management of asylum seekers. Most controversial of these has been the mandatory detention of asylum seekers, a policy applied indiscriminately and without discretion where individual cases have not been subject to judicial review or time constraints. From the outset health professionals have raised concerns about the possible adverse mental health impacts (...)
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  35.  20
    Cosmopolitanism Within Borders: A Normative Foundation for Health Care for Asylum Seekers?Verina Wild & Jan-Christoph Heilinger - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):17 - 19.
    Asgary and Smith (2013) identify an important challenge: the difficult position of physicians caught between the obligation to treat every human being with the same professional rigor, and their feelings of responsibility toward the state and its judicial decisions on asylum requests. The authors show that in some cases this conflict leads to a tendency to "sacrifice their medical responsibilities". The authors' core demand is that health care workers should be independent of the state and judiciary systems, and thus (...)
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  36.  39
    When Ethics, Healthcare, and Human Rights Conflict: Mental Healthcare for Asylum Seekers.Annemiek Richters - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (3):304-318.
    Mental health professionals who care for asylum seekers in Western European countries increasingly encounter problems for which standard diagnostic and therapeutic protocols and institutional healthcare policies offer no ready answers. In the following case vignettes some of these problems can be identified.
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  37.  11
    Refugees, EU Citizenship and the Common European Asylum System A Normative Dilemma for EU Integration.David Owen - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (2):347-369.
    This article argues that the practical difficulties and normative dilemmas at stake in the European refugee crisis as a crisis of EU integration extend beyond refugee policies into what we may call ‘the citizenship regime’ of the European Union in ways that are consequential for refugees, member states, and the European Union. It advances arguments for the relatively rapid access to citizenship of refugees, demonstrates that this norm has at least some acknowledgment in the policies of EU member states and (...)
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  38.  25
    Screening for Infectious Diseases of Asylum Seekers Upon Arrival: The Necessity of the Moral Principle of Reciprocity.Dorien T. Beeres, Darren Cornish, Machiel Vonk, Sofanne J. Ravensbergen, Els L. M. Maeckelberghe, Pieter Boele Van Hensbroek & Ymkje Stienstra - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):16.
    With a large number of forcibly displaced people seeking safety, the EU is facing a challenge in maintaining solidarity. Europe has seen millions of asylum seekers crossing European borders, the largest number of asylum seekers since the second world war. Endemic diseases and often failing health systems in their countries of origin, and arduous conditions during transit, raise questions around how to meet the health needs of this vulnerable population on arrival in terms of screening, vaccination, and access (...)
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  39.  16
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Returning to History: The Ethics of Researching Asylum Seeker Health in Australia”.Deborah Zion, Linda Briskman & Bebe Loff - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):6-7.
    Australia's policy of mandatory indefinite detention of those seeking asylum and arriving without valid documents has led to terrible human rights abuses and cumulative deterioration in health for those incarcerated. We argue that there is an imperative to research and document the plight of those who have suffered at the hands of the Australian government and its agents. However, the normal tools available to those engaged in health research may further erode the rights and well being of this population, (...)
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  40.  20
    Women’s Right To Asylum: Protecting The Rights Of Female Asylum Seekers In Europe?Jane Freedman - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):413-433.
    Criticisms have been made against international laws and conventions on asylum and refugees, arguing that these have been based on a male model of definition, which have ignored women’s persecutions. This article will argue that recent developments in European asylum policy have the potential to deepen this discrimination and to further reduce the rights of female asylum seekers. Although there have been some positive developments in jurisprudence that have recognised that gender-specific persecution may be the basis for (...)
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  41.  37
    “We Cannot Claim Any Particular Knowledge of the Ways of Homosexuals, Still Less of Iranian Homosexuals …”: The Particular Problems Facing Those Who Seek Asylum on the Basis of Their Sexual Identity.Barry O’Leary - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):87-95.
    Many lesbians and gay men apply for asylum in the U.K. each year on the basis that they fear persecution in their home country because of their sexual orientation. The legal basis for claiming asylum on the ground of sexual identity is now well established. Nevertheless, making these claims remains very difficult for applicants. Western cultural expectations around sexual identity often mix with homophobic assumptions about sexual behaviour to present applicants as “not sufficiently gay”. Furthermore, applicants may not (...)
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  42.  10
    Citizenship Status, Warm Glow, and Prosocial Behavior: A Quasi-Experiment on Giving Behavior by Host-Country Citizens and Asylum Seekers.Andreas Tutić & Ulf Liebe - 2018 - Analyse & Kritik 40 (1):161-184.
    This paper is concerned with the question of whether and how social class and status affect prosocial behavior among status groups.We conducted dictator games in which both host-country citizens as well as asylum seekers make monetary donations towards their respective in- and out-groups. As a novelty, we varied the number of recipients in the dictator game. Our results indicate that host-country citizens donate significantly more than asylum seekers and that asylum seekers receive significantly higher donations than host-country (...)
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  43.  49
    Encountering Asylum Seekers: An Ethic of Fear or Faith?S. Snyder - 2011 - Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (3):350-366.
    Asylum is a contentious public and political issue and people seeking asylum are often targets of fear and hostility. This article presents an ethical challenge to churches aiming to support asylum seekers in the UK. Through an exploration of two contrasting strands in the biblical tradition relating to the ‘stranger’—one rooted in an ‘ecology of fear’ and another rooted in an ‘ecology of faith’—it argues that as well as practising positive encounters with newcomers, Christians need to understand (...)
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  44.  52
    Sexual and Reproductive Health of Asylum-Seeking and Refugee Women in Europe: Entitlements and Access to Health Services.Kristin Janssens, Marleen Bosmans, Els Leye & Marleen Temmerman - 2006 - Journal of Global Ethics 2 (2):183 – 196.
    Asylum-seeking and refugee women (ASRW) are population groups characterized by diverse social, economic and legal backgrounds as well as diverse needs. Their backgrounds of forced migration have a profound impact on their overall health, including their sexual and reproductive health (SRH). In Europe, the SRH needs of ASRW are usually more pressing than those of the host country population. In the context of refugee health, it is important to distinguish between asylum seekers and statutory refugees, as asylum (...)
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  45.  28
    What Can Social Psychologists Learn From Architecture? The Asylum as Example.Juliet L. H. Foster - 2014 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2):131-147.
    In this paper I argue for a stronger consideration of the possible relationship between social psychology and architecture and architectural history. After a brief review of some of the ways in which other social psychologists have sought to develop links between social psychology and history, I consider the utility of architecture in more depth, especially to the social psychologist interested in the development of knowledge and understanding. I argue that, especially when knowledge is institutionalised, the design and use of buildings (...)
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  46.  11
    Refugee Asylum: Deuteronomy’s ‘Disobedient’ Law.Myrto Theocharous - 2017 - Studies in Christian Ethics 30 (4):464-474.
    Taking the contemporary definition for ‘refugee’ by the UN High Commission for Refugees as a starting point, this article examines the law on refugee asylum in Deut. 23:16-17 for parallel points and concerns, in order to gain insight into the ethics that have driven its composition. This law is commonly included in discussions on slavery due to the use of עֶ֫בֶד, but the identification of this ‘slave’ as a foreign refugee seeking asylum in Israel has not been adequately (...)
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  47.  36
    Privatization and Delegation of State Authority in Asylum Systems.Tally Kritzman-Amir - 2011 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 5 (1):194-215.
    One of the measures taken by states to relieve the burden of providing for asylum seekers and refugees is privatization and delegation of asylum regimes. I analyze the privatization and delegation of authority that is taking place within asylum systems and describe three tiers of privatization/delegation: 1. admission at points of entry or criminalization of undocumented entry, 2. status determination, 3. social integration and provision of social and economic rights and benefits. I then ask why states are (...)
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  48.  22
    Medicolegal Certificates in Investigations of Asylum Applications.L. Forsman - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):289-289.
    sirAccording to the Swedish Immigration Board , about 26,500 people per year have applied for asylum in Sweden during the last decade. Experiences from Denmark show that up to 20% of those who seek asylum have been subjected to torture or severe ill-treatment in their home countries.1 Since 1992, most of these applicants have been examined at the Centre for Torture and Trauma survivors in Stockholm.2 The findings are described in medicolegal certificates submitted to the immigration authorities.The present (...)
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  49.  23
    Disciplinary Power and the Role of the Subject at a Nineteenth-Century Danish Asylum.Bjørn Hamre - 2010 - PhaenEx 5 (2):1-27.
    This article reports on the ways in which psychiatric practice and power were constituted in a Danish asylum at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The point of departure will be a complaint by a former patient questioning the practice at the asylum in 1829. In an analysis of this narrative the study draws upon Foucauldian concepts like disciplinary power, confession, pastoral power and subjectivation. I will argue that the critique of the patient provides us with an example (...)
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  50.  22
    BLOG: Greece, Portugal, Spain and the East European States Take on Less Than Their Fair Share of Responsibility for EU Asylum Seekers.Luc Bovens & Günperi Sisman - 2013 - LSE European Politics and Policy (EUROPP) Blog (xx):xx.
    One of the stated aims of the “2008 Policy Plan on Asylum” by the European Commission is increased ‘responsibility sharing’ between Member States with respect to asylum seekers. Luc Bovens and Günperi Sisman assess the extent to which UNHCR outcome data reflect these aims between 2006 and 2011 – from the end of the first phase of the Common European Asylum System until the latest available data. They find that Greece, Portugal and Spain take on very low (...)
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