Results for 'autonomy of special sciences'

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  1. The Causal Autonomy of the Special Sciences.Peter Menzies & Christian List - 2010 - In Cynthia Mcdonald & Graham Mcdonald (eds.), Emergence in Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The systems studied in the special sciences are often said to be causally autonomous, in the sense that their higher-level properties have causal powers that are independent of those of their more basic physical properties. This view was espoused by the British emergentists, who claimed that systems achieving a certain level of organizational complexity have distinctive causal powers that emerge from their constituent elements but do not derive from them.2 More recently, non-reductive physicalists have espoused a similar view (...)
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  2.  43
    Radical Embodiment and Morphological Computation: Against the Autonomy of (Some) Special Sciences.Paco Calvo & John Symons - unknown
    An asymmetry between the demands at the computational and algorithmic levels of description furnishes the illusion that the abstract profile at the computational level can be multiply realized, and that something is actually being shared at the algorithmic one. A disembodied rendering of the situation lays the stress upon the different ways in which an algorithm can be implemented. However, from an embodied approach, things look rather different. The relevant pairing, I shall argue, is not between implementation and algorithm, but (...)
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    A Physicalist Account of Multiple Realizability in the Special Sciences.Meir Hemmo & Orly R. Shenker - unknown
    Multiple realizability seems to be empirically justified and provides the conceptual basis for the autonomy of the special sciences. But it is mysterious. In this talk I propose a new reductionist approach to the special sciences that removes the mystery: I explain why the special sciences kinds appear to be multiply realized although they are identical with physical kinds and in what sense the special sciences kinds and laws are autonomous although (...)
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  4. Special-Science Autonomy and the Division of Labor.Michael Strevens - forthcoming - In Mark Couch & Jessica Pfeifer (eds.), The Philosophy of Philip Kitcher.
    Philip Kitcher has advocated and advanced an influential antireductionist picture of science on which the higher-level sciences pursue their aims largely independently of the lower-level sciences -- a view of the sciences as autonomous. Explanatory autonomy as Kitcher understands it is incompatible with explanatory reductionism, the view that a high-level explanation is inevitably improved by providing a lower-level explanation of its parts. This paper explores an alternative conception of autonomy based on another major theme of (...)
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  5.  8
    Metaphysics of Money: A Special Case of Emerging Autonomy in Evolving Subsystems.Robert B. Glassman - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):186-187.
    There is “something more” to money, as this incisive review shows. The target article's shortcoming is its overextension of the “drug” metaphor as a blend of features that do not fit the rationalistic economics and behavioral psychologies summarized as tool theories, but this may be resolved by viewing money as a particular case of the more general evolutionary phenomenon of emergent subsystem autonomy. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  6.  34
    Special Sciences: Still a Flawed Argument After All These Years.Todd Jones - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (3):409-432.
    Jerry Fodor has argued that the multiple realizability argument, as discussed in his original “Special Sciences” article, “refutes psychophysical reductionism once and for all.” I argue that his argument in “Special Sciences” does no such thing. Furthermore, if one endorses the physicalism that most supporters of the “Special Sciences” view endorse, special science laws must be reducible, in principle. The compatibility of MR with reduction, however, need not threaten the autonomy of the (...)
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  7. Revising the Concept of Lawhood: Special Sciences and Natural Kinds.Amir Eshan Karbasizadeh - 2008 - Synthese 162 (1):15-30.
    The Kripkean conception of natural kinds (kinds are defined by essences that are intrinsic to their members and that lie at the microphysical level) indirectly finds support in a certain conception of a law of nature, according to which generalizations must have unlimited scope and be exceptionless to count as laws of nature. On my view, the kinds that constitute the subject matter of special sciences such as biology may very well turn out to be natural despite the (...)
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    Non-Committal Causal Explanations.David Pineda - 2010 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):147-170.
    Some causal explanations are non-committal in that mention of a property in the explanans conveys information about the causal origin of the explanandum even if the property in question plays no causal role for the explanandum . Programme explanations are a variety of non-committal causal (NCC) explanations. Yet their interest is very limited since, as I will argue in this paper, their range of applicability is in fact quite narrow. However there is at least another variety of NCC explanations, causal (...)
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  9. Special Sciences, Conspiracy and the Better Best System Account of Lawhood.Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender - 2010 - Erkenntnis 73 (3):427 - 447.
    An important obstacle to lawhood in the special sciences is the worry that such laws would require metaphysically extravagant conspiracies among fundamental particles. How, short of conspiracy, is this possible? In this paper we'll review a number of strategies that allow for the projectibility of special science generalizations without positing outlandish conspiracies: non-Humean pluralism, classical MRL theories of laws, and Albert and Loewer's theory. After arguing that none of the above fully succeed, we consider the conspiracy problem (...)
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  10. The Undeniable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Special Sciences.Mark Colyvan - unknown
    In many of the special sciences, mathematical models are used to provide information about specified target systems. For instance, population models are used in ecology to make predictions about the abundance of real populations of particular organisms. The status of mathematical models, though, is unclear and their use is hotly contested by some practitioners. A common objection levelled against the use of these models is that they ignore all the known, causally-relevant details of the often complex target systems. (...)
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  11. Colors as Properties of the Special Sciences.Kent Johnson & Wayne Wright - 2005 - Erkenntnis 64 (2):139 - 168.
    We examine the pros and cons of color realism, exposing some desiderata on a theory of color: the theory should render colors as scientifically legitimate and correctly individuated, and it should explain how we have veridical color experiences. We then show that these desiderata can by met by treating colors as properties of the special sciences. According to our view, some of the major as properties of the special sciences. According to our view, some of the (...)
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  12.  2
    Davidson and the Autonomy of the Human Sciences.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2011 - In Jeff Malpas (ed.), Dialogues with Davidson: New Perspectives on his Philosophy. MIT Press.
    This chapter explores the kind of nonreductivism defended by Davidson and compares it with that which predominated in mid-century. Davidson’s argument for the autonomy of the human sciences is contrasted with the one developed by R. G. Collingwood as presented through the interpretative efforts of W. H. Dray. It is argued here that Davidson’s arguments against the anticausalist consensus that dominated the first half of the twentieth century were not conclusive and that the success of causalism in the (...)
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  13.  30
    Identity and Autonomy of Psychology in Cognitive Sciences: Some Remarks From Language Processing and Knowledge Representation.Daniele Dubois - 1994 - World Futures 42 (1):71-78.
    (1994). Identity and autonomy of psychology in cognitive sciences: Some remarks from language processing and knowledge representation. World Futures: Vol. 42, No. 1-2, pp. 71-78.
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  14. Laws in the Special Sciences: A Comparative Study of Biological Generalizations.Mehmet Elgin - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    The question of whether biology contains laws has important implications about the nature of science. Some philosophers believe that the legitimacy of the special sciences depends on whether they contain laws. In this dissertation, I defend the thesis that biology contains laws. In Chapter I, I discuss the importance of this problem and set the stage for my inquiry. In Chapter V, I summarize the results of Chapters II, III, and IV and I offer reasons why the position (...)
     
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  15. The Future of Educational Research in the Context of the Social Sciences: A Special Case?Rosemary Deem - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (2):143-158.
    The paper examines the future prospects for educational research as conducted in UK universities and colleges of higher education in the light of current general changes in the organisation, funding and culture of higher education, and in respect of specific changes in the initial and in service training of teachers. It includes a critical examination of the claim made by some educational researchers that their research constitutes a special case, differentiated from other social science and humanities disciplines, both by (...)
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  16.  54
    Abstraction and Explanatory Relevance; or, Why Do the Special Sciences Exist?Matthew C. Haug - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (5):1143-1155.
    Non-reductive physicalists have long held that the special sciences offer explanations of some phenomena that are objectively superior to physical explanations. This explanatory “autonomy” has largely been based on the multiple realizability argument. Recently, in the face of the local reduction and disjunctive property responses to multiple realizability, some defenders of non-reductive physicalism have suggested that autonomy can be grounded merely in human cognitive limitations. In this paper, I argue that this is mistaken. By distinguishing between (...)
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  17.  76
    Physicalism and Downward Causation in Psychology and the Special Sciences.Theo C. Meyering - 2000 - Inquiry 43 (2):181-202.
    Physicalism ? or roughly the view that the stuff that physics talks about is all the stuff there is ? has had a popular press in philosophical circles during the twentieth century. And yet, at the same time, it has become quite fashionable lately to believe that the mind matters in this world after all and that psychology is an autonomous science irreducible to physics. However, if (true, downward) mental causation implies non-reducibility and Physicalism implies the converse, it is hard (...)
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  18. Comments and Criticism on Multiple Realization and the Special Sciences.Alex Rosenberg - manuscript
    It is widely held that disciplines are autonomous when their taxonomies are “substrate neutral” and when the events, states and processes that realize their descriptive vocabulary are heterogeneous. This will be particularly true in the case of disciplines whose taxonomy consists largely in terms that individuate by function. Having concluded that the multiple realization of functional kinds is far less widespread than assumed or argued for, Shapiro cannot avail himself of the argument for the autonomy of the special (...)
     
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  19. The Metaphysics of Realization, Multiple Realizability, and the Special Sciences.Carl Gillett - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (11):591-603.
  20. Special Sciences (Or: The Disunity of Science as a Working Hypothesis).J. A. Fodor - 1974 - Synthese 28 (2):97-115.
  21. Foundational Problems in the Special Sciences Part Two of the Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, London, Ontario, Canada, 1975.Robert E. Butts & Jaakko Hintikka - 1977
     
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  22.  33
    On the Autonomy of the Sciences.Philip Kitcher - 2004 - Philosophy Today 48 (5):51-57.
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  23. Special Sciences, or Disunity of Science as a Working Hypothesis.Jerry Fodor - 1974 - Synthese 28 (2):97--115.
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  24. Individualism and the Unity of Science: Essays on Reduction, Explanation and the Special Sciences (Steve Clarke).H. Kincaid - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (4):518-518.
     
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  25.  2
    Special Issue: Papers From the Inaugural Meeting of ENPOSS (European Network for the Philosophy of the Social Sciences), University of Copenhagen, September 21-23, 2012. [REVIEW]Julie Zahle, Alban Bouvier, Byron Kaldis, Thomas Uebel & Jesús Zamora-Bonilla - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3).
  26.  1
    On the Autonomy of the Sciences.Philip Kitcher - 2004 - Philosophy Today 48 (Supplement):51-57.
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  27. Logic, Foundations of Mathematics and Computability Theory / Foundational Problems in the Special Sciences / Basic Problems in Methodology and Linguistics / Historical and Philosophical Dimensions of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science. Parts One, Two, Three and Four of the Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science.R. E. Butts & J. Hintikka - 1980 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 11 (1):194-195.
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  28. 18 Special Sciences (Or: The Disunity of Science As).Jerry A. Fodor - 2002 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. pp. 126.
     
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  29. Explaining Explanation: Essays in the Philosophy of the Special Sciences.Lee McIntyre - 2012 - Upa.
    This book is a collection of Lee McIntyre’s philosophical essays from over the last twenty years. Explaining Explanation focuses on the philosophy of social science and the philosophy of chemistry, but also covers more general problems such as underdetermination, explanatory exclusion, the accommodation-prediction debate, and laws in biological science.
     
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  30.  9
    The Problem of the Relation of Philosophy to Special Sciences as Discussed in Cracow in the Period 1944—1974.Zbigniew Kuderowicz & Maciej Łęcki - 1975 - Dialectics and Humanism 2 (2):147-155.
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  31.  5
    Olga Pombo, Juan Manuel Torres, John Symons, and Shadid Rahman, Eds. , Special Sciences and the Unity of Science . Reviewed By.Hinne Hettema - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (4):315-317.
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  32. Place and the Function of Philosophy and Special Sciences in Contemporary-World.M. Buhr - 1979 - Filosoficky Casopis 27 (1):1-6.
     
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  33. Doctrina-Et-Disciplina-Unity of the Sciences and Autonomy of Reason in Descartes'regulae Ad Directionem Ingenii'.A. Gajano - 1993 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 13 (1):57-85.
     
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  34. Natural Properties and the Special Sciences: Nonreductive Physicalism Without Levels of Reality or Multiple Realizability.C. Haug Matthew - 2011 - The Monist 94 (2):244-266.
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  35. Special Sciences and the Unity of Science.Torres Juan, Pombo Olga, Symons John & Rahman Shahid (eds.) - 2012 - Springer.
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  36. Explanation in the Special Sciences - The Case of Biology and History.Marie I. Kaiser, Oliver Scholz, Daniel Plenge & Andreas Hüttemann (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
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  37. On the Relation of the Philosophy and the Special Sciences.A. Polikarov - 1980 - Filosoficky Casopis 28 (2):177-189.
     
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  38. The Penetrating of the Ideas of the Philosophy Into the Special Sciences.S. Sarkisjan - 1980 - Filosoficky Casopis 28 (2):190-200.
     
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  39. Twentieth-Century Realism and the Autonomy of the Human Sciences: The Case of George Santayana.Michael A. Weinstein - 1983 - Analecta Husserliana 15:119.
     
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  40.  11
    The Principle of Limits: With Special Reference to the Social Sciences.Jules Henry - 1950 - Philosophy of Science 17 (3):247-253.
  41. Rabin Michael O.. Weakly Definable Relations and Special Automata. Mathematical Logic and Foundations of Set Theory, Proceedings of an International Colloquium Held Under the Auspices of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Jerusalem, 11-14 November 1968, Edited by Bar-Hillel Yehoshua, Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam and London 1970, Pp. 1–23. [REVIEW]Dirk Siefkes - 1975 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (4):622-623.
  42.  13
    The Future of Educational Research in the Context of the Social Sciences: A Special Case?Rosemary Deem - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (2):143-158.
    The paper examines the future prospects for educational research as conducted in UK universities and colleges of higher education in the light of current general changes in the organisation, funding and culture of higher education, and in respect of specific changes in the initial and in service training of teachers. It includes a critical examination of the claim made by some educational researchers that their research constitutes a special case, differentiated from other social science and humanities disciplines, both by (...)
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  43.  8
    Colin Koopman (Ed.) , “Special Issue: Foucault Across the Disciplines,” History of the Human Sciences , Vol. 24, No 4, October (2011). [REVIEW]Michael Solda - 2013 - Foucault Studies:175-179.
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  44.  7
    Principles and Procedures of Statistics, with Special Reference to the Biological Sciences.R. G. Carpenter - 1960 - The Eugenics Review 52 (3):172.
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    B. Buldt, B. Lowe and T. Muller (Eds.), Special Issue of Erkenntnis: Towards a New Epistemology of Mathematics_ ; B. Lowe and T. Muller (Eds.), _PhiMSAMP: Philosophy of Mathematics: Sociological Aspects and Mathematical Practice_; K. Francois, B. Lowe, T. Muller and B. Van Kerkhove (Eds.), _Foundations of the Formal Sciences VII: Bringing Together Philosophy and Sociology of Science[REVIEW]R. Thomas - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):258-260.
  46.  3
    B. Buldt, B. Löwe and T. Müller (Eds.), Special Issue Towards a New Epistemology of Mathematics; B. Löwe and T. Müller (Eds.), PhiMSAMP: Philosophy of Mathematics: Sociological Aspects and Mathematical Practice; K. François, B. Löwe, T. Müller and B. Van Kerkhove (Eds.), Foundations of the Formal Sciences VII: Bringing Together Philosophy and Sociology of Science. [REVIEW]Robert Thomas - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):258-260.
  47.  1
    Between Autonomy and Planning: The Chinese Academy of Sciences in Transition. [REVIEW]Hans Kühner - 1984 - Minerva 22 (1):13-44.
  48. The Development and Present Status of Teacher Education in Western Canada, with Special Reference to the Curriculum: A Part of a Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Division of the Social Sciences in Candidacy for the Degree of Philosophy.William Griffiths Black - 1936 - University of Chicago Libraries.
     
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  49. Fossils and Progress. Paleontology and the Idea of Progressive Evolution in the Nineteenth CenturyPeter J. BowlerHistory of the Earth Sciences During the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, with Special Emphasis on the Physical GeosciencesD. H. Hall. [REVIEW]John Lyon - 1978 - Isis 69 (3):445-446.
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  50. Epistemology, Meaning and Metaphysics After Matilal, Special Issue of Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Vol. 3, No. 2, Edited by Arindam Chakrabarti. [REVIEW]M. Siderits - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48:503-513.
     
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