Results for 'basic liberties'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  68
    The Basic Liberties.Philip Pettit - 2008 - In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political, and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    We have two ways of talking about liberty or freedom, one in the singular, the other in the plural. We concern ourselves in the singular mode with how far someone is free to do or not to do certain things, or with how far someone is a free person or not a free person. But, equally, we concern ourselves with the plural question as to how far the person enjoys the liberties that we take to be important or (...). What are those plural liberties, however? What does it take for something to count as a basic liberty? e usual approach to this question is to give a list of some presumptive basic liberties — say, those of thought, speech, and association — and then to add a gestural ‘and so on’. My aim in this paper is to do a little better in elaborating a conception of the sorts of liberties at which the ‘and so on’ gestures. I argue that the basic liberties can be usefully identifi ed as the liberties required for living the life of a free person or citizen and I spell out that requirement in three constraints, which I describe as feasible extension, personal signifi cance and equal co-enjoyment. ere are many candidate sets of basic liberties that might be proposed for protection, whether in general or for a particular society. e claim that I defend is that in order to count as a set of basic liberties, the types of choice protected under any proposal should be capable of being equally enjoyed at the same time by everyone (equal co-enj oyment), should be important in the life of normal human beings (personal signifi cance), and should not be unnecessarily restricted: they should be as extensive as the other constraints allow (feasible extension). e aim of the paper being quite limited, I abstract from many important issues. I do not provide an argument for why it is important that some set of basic liberties be protected, nor do I rate the importance of such protection against other social goals. I say nothing on how far it should be a requirement of democracy that certain sorts of liberties are entrenched—whether constitutionally or otherwise—and how far democratic process should be allowed to vary the specifi - cation and protection of basic liberties.. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  2. The Basic Liberties and Their Priority.John Rawls - 1987 - In John Rawls & Sterling M. McMurrin (eds.), Liberty, Equality, and Law: Selected Tanner Lectures on Moral Philosophy. University of Utah Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  3. What Are Basic Liberties?Attila Tanyi & Stephen K. McLeod - manuscript
    Our initial aim is to characterize, in a manner more precise than before, what John Rawls calls the “analytical” method of arrival at a list of basic liberties. As we understand it, this method employs one or more general conditions that, under any just social order whatever, putative entitlements must meet in order for them to be among the basic liberties encompassed, within some just social order, by Rawls’s first principle of justice (i.e., the liberty principle). (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  25
    Basic Liberties, the Moral Powers and Workplace Democracy.Stephen K. McLeod - 2018 - Ethics, Politics and Society 1:232–261.
    The article responds to previous work, by Martin O’Neill, about the Rawlsian case for an entitlement to an element of workplace democracy. Of the three arguments for such an entitlement that O’Neill discusses, this article focuses mainly on the one he rejects (on the grounds of its having an implausible premise): the Fundamental Liberties Argument, according to which the right to an element of workplace democracy is a basic liberty. This article argues that while the argument can be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  51
    Why Free Market Rights Are Not Basic Liberties.C. M. Melenovsky & Justin Bernstein - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):47-67.
    Most liberals agree that governments should protect certain basic liberties, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of the person. Liberals disagree, however, about whether free market rights should also be protected. By “free market rights,” we mean those rights typically associated with laissez-faire economic systems such as freedom of contract, a right to market returns, and claims to privately own the means of production.We do not use the phrase “economic liberties,” as Tomasi does, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Basic Liberties and Global Justice.Gillian Brock - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 19 (2).
    My primary goals in this article are to show: first, that we can identify and justify which basic freedoms are important ones to protect in the global context; second, that we can monitor whether we are making progress with respect to whether more or fewer people are enjoying the important freedoms; third, that we can identify some key institutions that play a central role in fortifying those freedoms; fourth, that we can help build or fortify local capacity with respect (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  27
    The Implicit Argument for the Basic Liberties.C. Melenovsky - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (4):433-454.
    Most criticism and exposition of John Rawls’s political theory has focused on his account of distributive justice rather than on his support for liberalism. Because of this, much of his argument for protecting the basic liberties remains under explained. Specifically, Rawls claims that representative citizens would agree to guarantee those social conditions necessary for the exercise and development of the two moral powers, but he does not adequately explain why protecting the basic liberties would guarantee these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  13
    Why Basic Liberties Are Bilateral.James W. Nickel - 1998 - Law and Philosophy 17 (5-6):627-634.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Why Basic Liberties Are Bilateral.W. J. - 1998 - Law and Philosophy 17 (s 5-6):627-634.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  26
    Basic Liberties, Self-Respect and Equality in Rawls' Papers After a Theory of Justice.Tatjana Glintić - 1992 - Theoria 35 (1):7-48.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  25
    Self-Respect or Self-Delusion? Tomasi and Rawls on the Basic Liberties.Richard Penny - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):397-411.
    A central feature of John Tomasi’s ‘Free Market Fairness’ is the emphasis it places upon the good of self-respect. Like Rawls, Tomasi believes that accounts of justice ought to offer support for the self-respect of citizens. Indeed, this is a key way in which Tomasi aspires to engage with the ‘high-liberal’ tradition. Unlike Rawls however, Tomasi argues that this support is best provided by our treating a broader set of economic liberties as basic liberties. In this paper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Political Liberalism, Basic Liberties, and Legal Paternalism.William Glod - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):177-196.
    This essay argues that neutral paternalism (NP) is problematic for antiperfectionist liberal theories. Section 2 raises textual evidence that Rawlsian liberalism does not oppose and may even support NP. In section 3, I cast doubt on whether NP should have a place in political liberalism by defending a partially comprehensive conception of the good I call “moral capacity at each moment,” or MCEM, that is inconsistent with NP. I then explain why MCEM is a reasonable conception on Rawls's account of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  39
    All Liberty is Basic.Jessica Flanigan - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (4):455-474.
    Recent arguments for the basic status of economic liberty can be deployed to show that all liberty is basic. The argument for the basic status of all liberty is as follows. First, John Tomasi’s defense of basic economic liberties is successful. Economic freedom can be further defended against powerful high liberal objections, which libertarians including Tomasi have so far overlooked. Yet arguments for basic economic freedom raise a puzzle about the distinction between basic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  9
    Review: Why Basic Liberties Are Bilateral. [REVIEW]James W. Nickel - 1998 - Law and Philosophy 17 (5/6):627 - 634.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights?Jeppe von Platz - 2014 - Politics, Philosophy, and Economics 13 (1):23-44.
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  16.  39
    Freedom of Thought as a Basic Liberty.Lucas Swaine - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (3):405-425.
    Freedom of thought has been lauded in political theory and celebrated in human rights discourse. But what kind of freedom is it? I propose that freedom of thought deserves status as a basic liberty, given the significance of thought to human life, the fundamental importance of freedom of thought in establishing and sustaining crucial rights and freedoms, and the value of being able to develop and experience one’s thoughts without undue influence from others.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights?Jeppe von Platz - 2014 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (1):23-44.
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  18. Liberty, its Use and Abuse, Being the Principles of Ethics, Basic and Applied.Ignatius Wiley Cox - 1946 - New York: Fordham University Press.
  19.  21
    Against the Moral Powers Test of Basic Liberty.Jason Brennan - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):492-505.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  27
    Are The Economic Liberties Basic?Alan Patten - 2014 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 26 (3-4):362-374.
    ABSTRACTAccording to John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness, there are serious constraints on what a liberal state may do to promote economic justice. Tomasi defends this claim by arguing that important economic liberties ought to be regarded as “basic” and given special priority over other liberal concerns, including those of economic justice. I argue that Tomasi's defense of this claim is unsuccessful. One problem takes the form of a dilemma: depending on how the claim is formulated more precisely, Tomasi's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  21.  55
    Liberty and its Economies.Alex Gourevitch - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (4):365-390.
    The revival of classical liberal thought has reignited a debate about economic freedom and social justice. Classical liberals claim to defend expansive economic freedom, while their critics wish to restrict this freedom for other values. However, there are two problems with the role ‘economic freedom’ plays in this debate: inconsistency in the use of the concept and indeterminacy with respect to its definition. Inconsistency in the use of the concept ‘freedom’ has mistakenly made a certain kind of ‘left-wing’ critique of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22.  5
    The Basic Right to Liberty.George E. Panichas - 1990 - Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (1):55-76.
  23.  31
    Putting Liberty in its Place: Rawlsian Liberalism Without the Liberalism.Samuel Arnold - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):213-237.
    To be a liberal is, among other things, to grant basic liberties some degree of priority over other aspects of justice. But why do basic liberties warrant this special treatment? For Rawls, the answer has to do with the allegedly special connection between these freedoms and the ‘two moral powers’ of reasonableness and rationality. Basic freedoms are said to be preconditions for the development and exercise of these powers and are held to warrant priority over (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  86
    Liberty and Self-Respect.Henry Shue - 1975 - Ethics 85 (3):195-203.
    Although the thesis that equal basic liberties take priority over increases in wealth is one of the two most important theses in the rawlsian theory of justice, The argumentation for it is obscure. This article emphasizes the centrality of self-Respect in rawls' treatment of liberty, Specifies five particular assumptions he makes, And constructs a deductive argument from the rawlsian assumptions to the rawlsian conclusion about liberty. Of special interest are the premises of economic adequacy for the worst-Off man (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  25. On Liberty, Utilitarianism and Other Essays.John Stuart Mill - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    'it is only the cultivation of individuality which produces, or can produce, well developed human beings'Mill's four essays, 'On Liberty, 'Utilitarianism', 'Considerations on Representative Government', and 'The Subjection of Women' examine the most central issues that face liberal democratic regimes - whether in the nineteenth century or the twenty-first. They have formed the basis for many of the political institutions of the West since the late nineteenth century, tackling as they do the appropriate grounds for protecting individual liberty, the (...) principles of ethics, the benefits and the costs of representative institutions, and the central importance of gender equality in society.These essays are central to the liberal tradition, but their interpretation and how we should understand their connection with each other are both contentious. In their introduction Mark Philp and Frederick Rosen set the essays in the context of Mill's other works, and argue that his conviction in the importance of the development of human character in its full diversity provides the core to his liberalism and to any defensible account of the value of liberalism to the modern world. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26. The Liberty Principle and Universal Health Care.Benjamin Sachs - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):pp. 149-172.
    A universal entitlement to health care can be grounded in the liberty principle. A detailed examination of Rawls's discussion of health care in Justice as Fairness shows that Rawls himself recognized that illness is a threat to the basic liberties, yet failed to recognize the implications of this fact for health resource allocation. The problem is that one cannot know how to allocate health care dollars until one knows which basic liberties one seeks to protect, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Rawls’s Defense of the Priority of Liberty: A Kantian Reconstruction.Robert S. Taylor - 2003 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (3):246–271.
    Rawls offers three arguments for the priority of liberty in Theory, two of which share a common error: the belief that once we have shown the instrumental value of the basic liberties for some essential purpose (e.g., securing self-respect), we have automatically shown the reason for their lexical priority. The third argument, however, does not share this error and can be reconstructed along Kantian lines: beginning with the Kantian conception of autonomy endorsed by Rawls in section 40 of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  28. Completing Rawls's Arguments for Equal Political Liberty and its Fair Value: The Argument From Self-Respect.Meena Krishnamurthy - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):179-205.
    Despite the vast literature on Rawls's work, few have discussed his arguments for the value of democracy. When his arguments have been discussed, they have received staunch criticism. Some critics have charged that Rawls's arguments are not deeply democratic. Others have gone further, claiming that Rawls's arguments denigrate democracy. These criticisms are unsurprising, since Rawls's arguments, as arguments that the principle of equal basic liberty needs to include democratic liberties, are incomplete. In contrast to his trenchant remarks about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  29.  9
    Liberty in Health Care: A Comparative Study Between Hong Kong and Mainland China.Jingxian Wu & Ying Mao - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (6):690-719.
    This essay contends that individual liberty, understood as the permissibility of making choices about one’s own health care in support of one’s own good and the good of one’s family utilizing private resources, is central to the moral foundations of a health care system. Such individual freedoms are important not only because they often support more efficient and effective health care services, but because they permit individuals to fulfill important moral duties. A comparative study of the health care systems in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  33
    The Fair Value of Economic Liberty.Daniel Layman - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):413-428.
    In Free Market Fairness, John Tomasi tries to show that ‘thick’ economic liberties, including the right to own productive property, are basic liberties. According to Tomasi, the policy-level consequences of protecting economic liberty as basic are essentially libertarian in character. I argue that if economic liberties are basic, just societies must guarantee their fair value to all citizens. And in order to secure the fair value of economic liberty, states must guarantee that citizens of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  80
    In the Name of Liberty: An Argument for Universal Unionization.Mark R. Reiff - 2020 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    For years now, unionization has been under vigorous attack. Membership has been steadily declining, and with it union bargaining power. As a result, unions may soon lose their ability to protect workers from economic and personal abuse, as well as their significance as a political force. In the Name of Liberty responds to this worrying state of affairs by presenting a new argument for unionization, one that derives an argument for universal unionization in both the private and public sector from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  90
    Liberty Versus Equal Opportunity*: James S. Fishkin.James S. Fishkin - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (1):32-48.
    Liberalism has often been viewed as a continuing dialogue about the relative priorities between liberty and equality. When the version of equality under discussion requires equalization of outcomes, it is easy to see how the two ideals might conflict. But when the version of equality requires only equalization of opportunities, the conflict has been treated as greatly muted since the principle of equality seems so meager in its implications. However, when one looks carefully at various versions of equal opportunity and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  33. The Priority of Liberty.Robert S. Taylor - 2013 - In David Reidy & Jonathan Mandle (eds.), Companion to Rawls. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 147-163.
    Rawls offers three arguments for the priority of liberty in Theory, two of which share a common error: the belief that once we have shown the instrumental value of the basic liberties for some essential purpose (e.g., securing self-respect), we have automatically shown the reason for their lexical priority. The third argument, however, does not share this error and can be reconstructed along Kantian lines: beginning with the Kantian conception of autonomy endorsed by Rawls in section 40 of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Reconceiving Rawls’s Arguments for Equal Political Liberty and Its Fair Value.Meena Krishnamurthy - 2012 - Social Theory and Practice 38 (2):258-278.
    Few have discussed Rawls's arguments for the value of democracy. This is because his arguments, as arguments that the principle of equal basic liberty should include democratic liberties, are incomplete. Rawls says little about the inclusion of political liberties of a democratic sort – such as the right to vote – among the basic liberties. And, at times, what he does say is unconvincing. My aim is to complete and, where they fail, to reconceive Rawls's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35. Rawls on Liberty and Domination.M. Victoria Costa - 2009 - Res Publica 15 (4):397-413.
    One of the central elements of John Rawls’ argument in support of his two principles of justice is the intuitive normative ideal of citizens as free and equal. But taken in isolation, the claim that citizens are to be treated as free and equal is extremely indeterminate, and has virtually no clear implications for policy. In order to remedy this, the two principles of justice, together with the stipulation that citizens have basic interests in developing their moral capacities and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  75
    The Principle of Liberty and Legal Representation of Posterity.Kristian Skagen Ekeli - 2006 - Res Publica 12 (4):385-409.
    This paper considers a guardianship model for the legal representation of future generations. According to this model, national and international courts should be given the competence to appoint guardians for future generations, if agents who care about the welfare of posterity apply for the creation of a guardianship in relation to a dispute that can be resolved by the application of law. This reform would grant guardians of future people legal standing or locus standi before courts, that is, the right (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  37.  59
    Distributive Justice, the Basic Structure and the Place of Private Law.Samuel Scheffler - 2015 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 35 (2):213-235.
    In John Rawls’s theory, the role of the principles of justice is to regulate the basic structure of society—its major social, political and economic institutions—and to specify the fair terms of cooperation for free and equal persons. Some have interpreted Rawls as excluding contract law, and perhaps the private law as a whole, from the basic structure. However, this interpretation of Rawls is untenable, given the motivations for his emphasis on the basic structure and the highly inclusive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  38.  27
    Liberty, Political Rights and Wealth Transfer Taxation.S. Stewart Braun - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4):379-395.
    Libertarians famously contend that the minimal state is the most just social arrangement because it secures individual freedoms and basic political rights. They also oppose wealth transfer taxation, i.e. taxation of inheritances, bequests, and inter vivos gifts, arguing that it violates people's right to use their wealth freely. However, as I argue, libertarian opposition to wealth transfer taxation causes practical problems for their commitment to a minimal state, as there is strong empirical evidence demonstrating that wealth transfer taxation is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  43
    Liberty and Welfare Goods: Reflections on Clashing Liberalisms. [REVIEW]Loren Lomasky - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):99-113.
    Among the numerous moral commodities that political orders can produceand protect, classical liberalism assigns primacy to liberty, understoodas noninterference. As the nineteenth century advanced into its secondhalf, this primacy was increasingly seen as myopic. A more defensibleliberalism will devote itself to a wider range of basic human interests:this critique gained virtually unanimous acceptance within the newliberalism. Yet, surprisingly, during the past two decades classicalliberalism seems to have enjoyed a resurrection. This essay arguesthat it is well merited, that the superficial (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  9
    The Logic of Liberty.Gary Brent Madison - 1986 - Greenwood Press.
    Political liberalism has increasingly come under fire from both the right and the left, in politics as well as in philosophy. In this new study, G.B. Madison offers a systematic rebuttal to these contemporary critics, attempting to demonstrate that the basic principles of classical liberal philosophy are not only internally valid and coherent but also directly relevant to the problems faced by society in the post-industrial age. Building on the theory of Frank H. Knight and other liberal tinkers, Madison (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41. The Trouble with Terror: Liberty, Security and the Response to Terrorism.Tamar Meisels - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is terrorism and can it ever be defended? Beginning with its definition, proceeding to its possible justifications, and culminating in proposals for contending with and combating it, this book offers a full theoretical analysis of the issue of terrorism. Tamar Meisels argues that, regardless of its professed cause, terrorism is diametrically opposed to the requirements of liberal morality and can only be defended at the expense of relinquishing the most basic of liberal commitments. Meisels opposes those who express (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  8
    Religious Liberty and the Limits of Rawlsian Justice.V. Bradley Lewis - unknown - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association:71-84.
    Religious freedom is included among the basic liberties to which persons are entitled in John Rawls’s account of Justice as Fairness. Rawls’s revised presentation of this as a political conception of justice in Political Liberalism aims to show how it can be the focus of an overlapping consensus of reasonable comprehensive doctrines. As an example, Rawls contends that his understanding of religious freedom is consistent with that of the Roman Catholic Church, at least since the Second Vatican Council. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Donation Without Domination: Private Charity and Republican Liberty.Robert S. Taylor - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 26 (4):441-462.
    Contemporary republicans have adopted a less-than-charitable attitude toward private beneficence, especially when it is directed to the poor, worrying that rich patrons may be in a position to exercise arbitrary power over their impoverished clients. These concerns have led them to support impartial public provision by way of state welfare programs, including an unconditional basic income (UBI). In contrast to this administrative model of public welfare, I will propose a competitive model in which the state regulates and subsidizes a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  24
    Individual Liberty and Democratic Decision-Making: The Ethics, Economics, and Politics of Democracy.Peter Koslowski (ed.) - 1987 - J.C.B. Mohr.
    Individual Liberty and Democratic Decision-Making Editor's Introduction Individual liberty is the basic value and justification for the political order of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  56
    The Priority of Liberty: Rawls Versus Pogge.Edward Andrew Greetis - 2015 - Philosophical Forum 46 (2):227-245.
    Thomas Pogge argues that John Rawls’s priority of liberty rule is not constraining enough: it permits morally unacceptable restrictions of basic liberties. Because of this, Pogge claims that Rawls fails in his two central ambitions: to construct a moral conception that (1) opposes utilitarianism and (2) matches his judgments in reflective equilibrium. Pogge attributes this error to Rawls’s “purely recipient-oriented theorizing”—assessing a society’s basic structure based on how its citizens fare. I argue that Rawls’s theory does not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  16
    The Priority of Liberty: An Argument from Social Equality.Devon Cass - 2021 - Law and Philosophy 40 (2):129-161.
    John Rawls’s thesis that a certain package of basic liberties should be given lexical priority is of great interest for legal and political philosophy, but it has received relatively little defense from Rawls or his supporters. In this paper, I examine three arguments for the thesis: the first is based on the two ‘moral powers’; the second, on the social bases of self-respect; and the third, on a Kantian notion of autonomy. I argue none of these accounts successfully (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  33
    Life, Liberty, and Property.David Kelley - 1984 - Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (2):108.
    The words “liberty” and “liberalism” have a common root, reflecting the commitment of the original or classical liberals to a free society. Over the last century, the latter term has come to represent a political position that is willing to sacrifice liberty in the economic realm for the sake of equality and/or collective welfare. As a consequence, those who wish to reaffirm the classical version of liberalism – those who advocate liberty in economic as well as personal and intellectual matters (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. On Liberty, Utilitarianism and Other Essays.Mark Philp & Frederick Rosen (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    The four essays in this volume examine the most central issues that face liberal democratic regimes. They tackle the protection of individual liberty, the basic principles of ethics, the benefits and the costs of representative institutions, and the central importance of gender equality in society.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  4
    Liberty for the 21st Century: Contemporary Libertarian Thought. [REVIEW]Fred D. Miller Jr - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):411-412.
    In Loren Lomasky's wry understatement, which serves as this book's motto, "A century that has witnessed the Holocaust and the Gulag is not one which can be aptly characterized as paying too much heed to basic rights". In opposition to twentieth-century statism, there arose libertarianism, a political philosophy committed to individual rights. Following the decline and collapse of the Soviet Union and other communist states and amid growing doubts about the welfare state, the editors and contributors to Liberty for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Liberty, Toleration and Equality: John Locke, Jonas Proast and the Letters Concerning Toleration.John Tate - 2016 - Routledge.
    The seventeenth century English philosopher, John Locke, is widely recognized as one of the seminal sources of the modern liberal tradition. _Liberty, Toleration and Equality_ examines the development of Locke’s ideal of toleration, from its beginnings, to the culmination of this development in Locke’s fifteen year debate with his great antagonist, the Anglican clergyman, Jonas Proast. Locke, like Proast, was a sincere Christian, but unlike Proast, Locke was able to develop, over time, a perspective on toleration which allowed him to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000