Results for 'being towards death'

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  1. Being-Towards-Life and Being-Towards-Death: Heidegger and the Bible on the Meaning of Human Being.Richard Oxenberg - 2015
    This work is a revised version of my dissertation, originally presented in 2002. It explores questions of God and faith in the context of Martin Heidegger's phenomenological ontology, as developed in Being and Time. One problem with traditional philosophical approaches to the question of God is their tendency to regard God's existence as an objective datum, which might be proven or disproven through logical argumentation. Since Kant, such arguments have largely been dismissed as predicated on a priori assumptions whose (...)
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  2. Being-Towards-Death/Being-Towards-Life: Heidegger and Christianity on the Meaning of Human Being.Richard Oxenberg - 2002 - Dissertation, Emory University
    This work explores questions of God and faith in the context of Martin Heidegger's phenomenological ontology, as developed in Being and Time . One problem with traditional philosophical approaches to the question of God is their tendency to regard God's existence as an objective datum, which might be proven or disproven through logical argumentation. Since Kant, such arguments have largely been dismissed as predicated on a priori assumptions whose legitimacy cannot be substantiated. This dismissal has led to a widening (...)
     
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  3.  27
    Being Embodied and Being Towards Death.Alexander Broadie - unknown
    Each human being is a co-creator of the world and when a human being dies the world he co-created is thereby annihilated. The main authors discussed are Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus and David Hume.
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  4.  3
    Heideggerian Hermeneutic Phenomenology as Method: Modelling Analysis Through a Meta-Synthesis of Articles on Being-Towards-Death.Janice Gullick & Sandra West - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  5.  38
    BeingTowardsDeath and Owning One's Judgment.Denis McManus - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (2):245-272.
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  6.  65
    The Heideggerian Bias Toward Death: A Critique of the Role of Being-Towards-Death in the Disclosure of Human Finitude.Leslie Macavoy - 1996 - Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):63-77.
  7.  23
    Being-Towards-Death and Owning One's Judgment.Denis McManus - unknown
  8.  1
    Being-Towards-Death and One’s Own Best Judgment.Denis McManus - unknown
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  9.  11
    Being-Towards-Eternity: R. Isaac Hutner’s Adaptation of a Heideggerian Notion.Daniel Herskowitz & Alon Shalev - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):254-277.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 254 - 277 In his writings, Rabbi Isaac Hutner integrated various insights from secular philosophy and particularly from existentialist thought. Concerns regarding temporality, authenticity, and death permeate his thought. This article deals with what we call “being-towards-eternity,” a modification of Martin Heidegger’s “being-towards-death,” through which Hutner seeks to reconcile genuine anxiety in the face of finitude with an unwavering belief in resurrection and life after death. Hutner’s (...)
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  10.  10
    Mitmensch Contra Dasein: Karl Löwiths Anthropologische Kritik an der Daseinsanalytik.Agostino Cera - 2018 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 66 (4):488-506.
    This paper presents and discusses Karl Löwith’s anthropological critique of existential analytic that is formulated in his Habilitation thesis, where he develops an anthropological counter-paradigm, i. e. Mitanthropologie, in opposition to Heidegger’s fundamental ontology. Given the extent and the complexity of such a subject, I will limit the present inquiry to two specific topics: the Miteinandersein and above all the Sein zum Tode. In practice, I will first explain the basic features of Mitanthropologie together with the crucial critique that it (...)
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  11.  71
    Heidegger's Sein Zum Tode as Radicalization of Aristotle's Definition of Kinesis.Joseph Carter - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):473-502.
    There is evidence in the early Vorlesungen to suggest that in Sein und Zeit Heidegger’s description of Dasein as Bewegung/Bewegtheit relies on his reading of Aristotle’s definition of motion, given specifically in the 1924 Grundbegriffe der aristotelischen Philosophie. According to Heidegger, Aristotle identifies kinêsis with energeia and calls it ‘active potentiality’ (tätige Möglichkeit). In this essay, I show how Heidegger’s interpretation of Aristotle’s definition of motion sheds light on the arguments concerning being-towards-death (Sein zum Tode) in Sein (...)
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  12. Death and Liberation: A Critical Investigation of Death in Sartre's Being and Nothingness.Brian Lightbody - 2009 - Minerva--An Internet Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):85-98.
    In Being and Nothingness, Jean-Paul Sartre boldly asserts that: “To be dead is to be a prey for theliving.”1 In the following paper, I argue that Sartre’s rather pessimistic understanding of death isunwarranted. In fact, Herbert Marcuse forcefully suggests that Sartre is one of the “betrayers of Utopia”because Sartre’s notion of death stifles efforts towards true liberation. By returning to Eros andCivilization, I explain and further substantiate Marcuse’s critique of Sartrean freedom as originallypresented in Marcuse’s essay, (...)
     
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  13. Death And Liberation: A Critical Investigation Of Death In Sartre’s Being And Nothingness.Brian Lightbody - 2009 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 13:85-98.
    In Being and Nothingness, Jean-Paul Sartre boldly asserts that: “To be dead is to be a prey for theliving.”1 In the following paper, I argue that Sartre’s rather pessimistic understanding of death isunwarranted. In fact, Herbert Marcuse forcefully suggests that Sartre is one of the “betrayers of Utopia”because Sartre’s notion of death stifles efforts towards true liberation. By returning to Eros andCivilization, I explain and further substantiate Marcuse’s critique of Sartrean freedom as originallypresented in Marcuse’s essay, (...)
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  14. Towards a Hierarchical Definition of Life, the Organism, and Death.Gerard A. J. M. Jagers op Akkerhuis - 2010 - Foundations of Science 15 (3):245-262.
    Despite hundreds of definitions, no consensus exists on a definition of life or on the closely related and problematic definitions of the organism and death. These problems retard practical and theoretical development in, for example, exobiology, artificial life, biology and evolution. This paper suggests improving this situation by basing definitions on a theory of a generalized particle hierarchy. This theory uses the common denominator of the “operator” for a unified ranking of both particles and organisms, from elementary particles to (...)
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  15.  14
    Tasteless: Towards a Food-Based Approach to Death.Val Plumwood - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (3):323 - 330.
    In this posthumously published paper Val Plumwood reflects on two personal encounters with death, being seized as prey by a crocodile and burying her son in a country cemetery with a flourishing botanic community. She challenges the exceptionalism which sets the human self apart from nature and which is reflected in the choice between two conceptions of death, one of continuity in the realm of spirit, the other a reductive materialist conception in which death marks the (...)
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  16.  68
    Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2009), Pp. Xxi + 198.Douglas W. Portmore - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):500-503.
    Review of Ben Bradley's Well-Being and Death.
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  17.  25
    Death to Life: Towards My Green Burial.Robert Feagan - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (2):157 – 175.
    This paper presents reflections on the author's death aspirations as they are informed by a set of earth-connection stories, environmental concepts, and modernist burial practices. This weave is meant to inspire further consideration on what is coming to be known as 'green burial'. More precisely, this means an exploration of the author's earth-centred burial musings in association with the following themes: the meanings and historical trajectory of prevailing death and burial practices; 'narratives' of the human-earth life-cycle; relevant environmental (...)
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  18. Well-Being and Death.Ben Bradley - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
  19.  61
    Being, Aevum , and Nothingness: Edith Stein on Death and Dying. [REVIEW]Antonio Calcagno - 2008 - Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):59-72.
    This article seeks to present for the first time a more systematic account of Edith Stein’s views on death and dying. First, I will argue that death does not necessarily lead us to an understanding of our earthly existence as aevum, that is, an experience of time between eternity and finite temporality. We always bear the mark of our finitude, including our finite temporality, even when we exist within the eternal mind of God. To claim otherwise, is to (...)
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  20.  32
    Challenging the Epicureans: Death and Two Kinds of Well-Being.Byron J. Stoyles - 2011 - Philosophical Forum 42 (1):1-19.
    I argue that attempts to explain the badness of death as a deprivation to the person who dies fail to defeat the ancient Epicurean argument that death is bad for us even. At the same time, I argue that the deprivation account of the badness of death provides a way for us to understand how death can be bad for the person who dies. In support of this paradoxical thesis I invoke a distinction between momentary well- (...) and narrative well-being—a distinction which, while not entirely new, is insufficiently developed in the literature. (shrink)
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  21.  3
    Creation and Salvation in Edward Schillebeeckx. Well-Being as More About Jesus’ Death and Less About Resurrection.Ramona Simuț - 2017 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 16 (46):34-48.
    This paper is not merely an attempt to come to terms with Edward Schillebeeckx’s theology and his philosophical mindset. Such attempts have already been made years back, when his ties with phenomenology, and also with postmodern hermeneutics and culture were pivotal for us in order to better understand his influence on mid-20th century Continental philosophy. This present study partially remains on those premises, but also brings Schillebeeckx’s thought closer to the 21st century, since nowadays concepts like salvation and resurrection tend (...)
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  22. Epicurean Equanimity Towards Death.Kai Draper - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):92–114.
    This paper assesses two reformulations of Epicurus' argument that "death ... is nothing to us, since while we exist, death is not present; and whenever death is present, we do not exist." The first resembles many contemporary reformulations in that it attempts to reach the conclusion that death is not to the disadvantage of its subject. I argue that this rather anachronistic sort of reformulation cannot succeed. The second reformulation stays closer to the spirit of Epicurus' (...)
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  23.  20
    The Enigma of Being-Toward-Death.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (4):547.
    How is it that in anxiety Dasein gets brought before itself through its own Being, so that we can define phenomenologically the character of the entity disclosed in anxiety, and define it as such in its Being, or make adequate preparations for doing so?This “bodily nature” [of Dasein] hides a whole problematic of its own, though we shall not treat it here.Is the phenomenological disclosure that Heidegger seeks with respect to anxiety possible short of a disclosure of the (...)
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  24. Towards Non-Being: The Logic and Metaphysics of Intentionality.Graham Priest - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Graham Priest presents a ground-breaking account of the semantics of intentional language--verbs such as "believes," "fears," "seeks," or "imagines." Towards Non-Being proceeds in terms of objects that may be either existent or non-existent, at worlds that may be either possible or impossible. The book will be of central interest to anyone who is concerned with intentionality in the philosophy of mind or philosophy of language, the metaphysics of existence and identity, the philosophy of fiction, the philosophy of mathematics, (...)
  25.  37
    One or Two Types of Death? Attitudes of Health Professionals Towards Brain Death and Donation After Circulatory Death in Three Countries.D. Rodríguez-Arias, J. C. Tortosa, C. J. Burant, P. Aubert, M. P. Aulisio & S. J. Youngner - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):457-467.
    This study examined health professionals’ (HPs) experience, beliefs and attitudes towards brain death (BD) and two types of donation after circulatory death (DCD)—controlled and uncontrolled DCD. Five hundred and eighty-seven HPs likely to be involved in the process of organ procurement were interviewed in 14 hospitals with transplant programs in France, Spain and the US. Three potential donation scenarios—BD, uncontrolled DCD and controlled DCD—were presented to study subjects during individual face-to-face interviews. Our study has two main findings: (...)
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  26.  63
    Care, Death, and Time in Heidegger and Frankfurt.B. Scot Rousse - 2016 - In Roman Altshuler & Michael Sigrist (eds.), Time and the Philosophy of Action. New York: Routledge. pp. 225-241.
    Both Martin Heidegger and Harry Frankfurt have argued that the fundamental feature of human identity is care. Both contend that caring is bound up with the fact that we are finite beings related to our own impending death, and both argue that caring has a distinctive, circular and non-instantaneous, temporal structure. In this paper, I explore the way Heidegger and Frankfurt each understand the relations among care, death, and time, and I argue for the superiority of Heideggerian version (...)
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  27.  3
    Delusions of Death and Immortality: A Consequence of Misplaced Being in Cotard Patients.Garry Young - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):127-140.
    Discussion on the Cotard delusion often focuses on the patient’s delusional belief that he/she is dead. Of interest to this paper, however, is the little referred to claim made by some Cotard patients that they are immortal. How might one explain the juxta-position of death and immortality evident in patients sharing the same clinical diagnosis, and how might these delusional beliefs inform our understanding of patient phenomenology, particularly regarding experiences of existential change? This paper sets out to explain delusions (...)
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  28.  15
    Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-Being and Longevity.A. R. Singh - 2010 - Mens Sana Monographs 8 (1):17.
    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers (...)
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  29.  54
    Death and Aging in Technopolis: Towards a Role Definition of Wisdom.Edmund Byrne - 1976 - Journal of Value Inquiry 10 (3):161-177.
    In this paper I will argue that our own society's philosophy of death and dying has a largely negative effect on public policies towards the elderly, and that these policies will be changed for the better when and if we come to appreciate our elderly as the principal sources of our collective wisdom. Towards these ends, I shall consider in turn some basic types of theories about death, some basic attitudes towards dying and the duration (...)
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  30. Time, Death, and Eternity: Reflecting on Augustine's Confessions in Light of Heidegger's Being and Time.Richard James Severson - 1995 - Scarecrow Press.
    In Book XI of the Confessions Augustine claims that time has its beginning and ending in eternity. In Being and Time, Heidegger claims that death is the ultimate futural possibility for authentic human existence. These two texts, one from the fourth century, the other from the twentieth century, depict two very different perspectives on what limits the human conception of time. Can these perspectives be reconciled? Severson offers a new reading of the Confessions that affirms Augustine's religious quest (...)
     
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  31.  6
    Being, Man, & Death: A Key to Heidegger.James M. Demske - 1970 - [Lexington]University Press of Kentucky.
  32. Being and Death.José Ferrater Mora - 1965 - Berkeley: University of California Press.
  33.  3
    Being, Man and Death: A Key to Heidegger. [REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):540-540.
    Fr. James Demske first published this book in 1963 in Germany under the title: Sein, Mensch und Tod: Das Todesproblem bei Martin Heidegger. Except for minor revisions--such as changing the numeration and headings of the chapters and the occasional expansion of paragraphs--this is substantially the same book. The author follows the development of the problem of death in Heidegger through the famous discussion in Being and Time and into the later works. The fact of the continuing importance of (...)
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  34. The Future of Death: Cryonics and the Telos of Liberal Individualism.James Hughes - 2001 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 6 (1).
    This paper addresses five questions: First, what is trajectory of Western liberal ethics and politics in defining life, rights and citizenship? Second, how will neuro-remediation and other technologies change the definition of death for the brain injured and the cryonically suspended? Third, will people always have to be dead to be cryonically suspended? Fourth, how will changing technologies and definitions of identity affect the status of people revived from brain injury and cryonic suspension? I propose that Western liberal thought (...)
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  35.  48
    The Ethics of Donation and Transplantation: Are Definitions of Death Being Distorted for Organ Transplantation?Ari R. Joffe - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:28.
    A recent commentary defends 1) the concept of 'brain arrest' to explain what brain death is, and 2) the concept that death occurs at 2–5 minutes after absent circulation. I suggest that both these claims are flawed. Brain arrest is said to threaten life, and lead to death by causing a secondary respiratory then cardiac arrest. It is further claimed that ventilation only interrupts this way that brain arrest leads to death. These statements imply that brain (...)
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  36.  34
    Character and Well-Being: Towards an Ethics of Character.Michele Mangini - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (2):79-98.
    The debate between liberals and communitarians has still left liberalism without a plausible ethics. The ethics of character wants to offer a solid connection between political theory and personal identity, stressing the ethical role of the invariables of character against modern subjectivist competitors, such as authenticity. At a political level the ethics of character leads us beyond resourcist conceptions of justice. Key Words: ethics of character • personal identity • virtues • well-being.
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  37.  29
    Being and Death[REVIEW]G. D. R. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):594-594.
    A metaphysical continuum employing the opposing poles of interiority and exteriority is introduced in the first several sections by means of which all types of realities are to be located ontologically—an approach to ontology which aims at correcting the one-sidedness of ontologies from Parmenides and Democritus on. From the perspective of this bi-directional ontology inorganic, organic, and human realities are seen to be continuous but distinguishable with reference to the kinds of cessation or death which take place on each (...)
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  38.  14
    Total Brain Death and the Integration of the Body Required of a Human Being.Patrick Lee - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (3):300-314.
    I develop and refine an argument for the total brain death criterion of death previously advanced by Germain Grisez and me: A human being is essentially a rational animal, and so must have a radical capacity for rational operations. For rational animals, conscious sensation is a pre-requisite for rational operation. But total brain death results in the loss of the radical capacity for conscious sensation, and so also for rational operations. Hence, total brain death constitutes (...)
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  39. Temporal Finitude and Finitude of Possibility: The Double Meaning of Death in Being and Time.Havi Carel - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):541 – 556.
    The confusion surrounding Heidegger's account of death in Being and Time has led to severe criticisms, some of which dismiss his analysis as incoherent and obtuse. I argue that Heidegger's critics err by equating Heidegger's concept of death with our ordinary concept. As I show, Heidegger's concept of death is not the same as the ordinary meaning of the term, namely, the event that ends life. But nor does this concept merely denote the finitude of Dasein's (...)
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  40.  58
    Properties and Paradox in Graham Priest’s Towards Non-Being.Daniel Nolan - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):191 - 198.
    Part of a book symposium on Graham Priest's Towards Non-Being.
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  41.  39
    Further Into the Abyss: Graham Priest’s Towards Non-Being.Bob Hale - 2017 - Philosophia Mathematica 25 (3):394-406.
    PriestGraham. Towards Non-Being: The Logic and Metaphysics of Intentionality. Oxford University Press, 2016. 2nd ed. ISBN 978-0-19-878359-6 ; 978-0-19-878360-2. Pp. xxxvi + 368.
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  42.  39
    Being Exposed to Love: The Death of God in Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy.Ashok Collins - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 80 (3):297-319.
    In this article I explore how a philosophical conception of love may be used to draw debate on the death of God beyond the binary opposition between theology and philosophy through a comparative study of the work of Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy. Although Marion’s reading of love—in both its theological and phenomenological guises—proposes an innovative phrasing of a non-metaphysical notion of divinity, I argue that it is ultimately unable to maintain its coherence in nominal discourse due to Marion’s (...)
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  43.  19
    Death and Being: Kierkegaard, Heidegger, and Forgetfulness.George Pattison - unknown
    The article shows how where Heidegger depicts human beings as typically forgetting death and in doing so forgetting being, Kierkegaard focusses more on forgetfulness of self.
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  44.  8
    Being Capable of Death: Remarks on the Death of the Animal From a Phenomenological Perspective.Christian Sternad - 2017 - Studia Phaenomenologica 17:101-118.
    In this article, I investigate how phenomenologists have analysed the relation between man and animal with respect to death. The common tendency of most phenomenologists is to grant man a specific mode of being and to attribute a parallel but deficient mode to the animal. In this way, phenomenology fails to accomplish a positive phenomenological description of the animal’s mode of being or of animality as such. I turn to Heidegger’s decisive analysis of human/animal death since (...)
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  45.  4
    Changes in Attitudes Towards Hastened Death Among Finnish Physicians Over the Past Sixteen Years.Reetta P. Piili, Riina Metsänoja, Heikki Hinkka, Pirkko-Liisa I. Kellokumpu-Lehtinen & Juho T. Lehto - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):40.
    The ethics of hastened death are complex. Studies on physicians’ opinions about assisted dying exist, but changes in physicians’ attitudes towards hastened death in clinical decision-making and the background factors explaining this remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the changes in these attitudes among Finnish physicians. A questionnaire including hypothetical patient scenarios was sent to 1182 and 1258 Finnish physicians in 1999 and 2015, respectively. Two scenarios of patients with advanced cancer were presented: (...)
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  46.  13
    Fitness, Well-Being, and Preparation for Death.Moira Howes - 2016 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):115-140.
    In this article, I argue that we should revise our understanding of physical fitness to include preparation for challenging physically mediated life experiences—such as aging, disability, illness, reproduction, and death—as an important goal of physical activity. Such a revision is needed because the messages about fitness we encounter through “fitness ideology” can undermine the cultivation of skills and perspectives important for finding meaning, equanimity, and even happiness in light of such experiences. Because one of the ways that fitness ideology (...)
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  47.  21
    Death Penalty: The Political Foundations of the Global Trend Towards Abolition. [REVIEW]Eric Neumayer - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (2):241-268.
    The death penalty is like no other punishment. Its continued existence in many countries of the world creates political tensions within these countries and between governments of retentionist and abolitionist countries. After the Second World War, more and more countries have abolished the death penalty. This article argues that the major determinants of this global trend towards abolition are political, a claim which receives support in a quantitative cross-national analysis from 1950 to 2002. Democracy, democratisation, international political (...)
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  48.  25
    Early European Attitudes Towards "Good Death": Eugenios Voulgaris, Treatise on Euthanasia, St Petersburg, 1804.E. Galanakis & I. D. K. Dimoliatis - 2007 - Medical Humanities 33 (1):1-4.
    Eugenios Voulgaris was an eminent theologian and scholar, and bishop of Kherson, Ukraine. He copiously wrote treatises in theology, philosophy and sciences, greatly influenced the development of modern Greek thought, and contributed to the perception of Western thought throughout the Eastern Christian world. In his Treatise on euthanasia , Voulgaris tried to moderate the fear of death by exalting the power of faith and trust in the divine providence, and by presenting death as a universal necessity, a curative (...)
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  49.  2
    Emotional Labour and Indirectly Measured Attitude Towards Occupation in Explaining Employee Well-Being.Aleksandra Fila–Jankowska & Sylwiusz Retowski - 2013 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 44 (2):165-175.
    Drawing on the model of Grandey, it was proposed that the attitude towards occupation could buffer the negative effects of emotional labour. A total of 173 teachers participated in the study. Attitudes towards occupation, surface acting, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction were estimated. The indirect measure of the attitude towards occupation was assessed using the Approaching-Avoidance Simulation Method. Confirmatory Factor Analysis proved the validity and reliability of the indirect measurement, which is based on uncontrolled reactions of the (...)
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  50.  17
    Heidegger on Death and Being.Johannes Achill Niederhauser - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Warwick
    This thesis is a study of the role of the phenomenon of death in Heidegger’s philosophy. The central argument is twofold. First, death is the fulcrum of Heidegger’s philosophy. As such, second, death is a crucial key to Heidegger’s thought in its entirety. Thus I claim is that a response to the question of being can be given, if one takes death into account. This thesis, therefore, investigates the four main blocks of Heidegger’s philosophy and (...)
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