Results for 'benefiting from wrongdoing'

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  1. Benefiting From Wrongdoing and Sustaining Wrongful Harm.Christian Barry & David Wiens - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (5):530-552.
    Some moral theorists argue that innocent beneficiaries of wrongdoing may have special remedial duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims of the wrongdoing. These arguments generally aim to simply motivate the idea that being a beneficiary can provide an independent ground for charging agents with remedial duties to the victims of wrongdoing. Consequently, they have neglected contexts in which it is implausible to charge beneficiaries with remedial duties to the victims of wrongdoing, thereby failing (...)
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  2.  37
    Voluntary Benefits From Wrongdoing.Avia Pasternak - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):377-391.
    The principle of wrongful benefits prescribes that beneficiaries from wrongdoing incur duties towards the victims of the wrongdoing. The principle focuses on involuntary beneficiaries, demanding that they disgorge their tainted benefit. However, it overlooks the duties of beneficiaries who are not straightforwardly involuntary. The article addresses this gap in the literature. It explores the duties of ‘voluntary beneficiaries’, who could avoid receiving the tainted benefit; and the duties of ‘welcoming beneficiaries’, who cannot avoid receiving the tainted benefit (...)
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  3.  30
    Intending to Benefit From Wrongdoing.Robert E. Goodin & Avia Pasternak - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):280-297.
    Some believe that the mere beneficiaries of wrongdoing of others ought to disgorge their tainted benefits. Others deny that claim. Both sides of this debate concentrate on unavoidable beneficiaries of the wrongdoing of others, who are presumed themselves to be innocent by virtue of the fact they have neither contributed to the wrong nor could they have avoided receiving the benefit. But as we show, this presumption is mistaken for unavoidable beneficiaries who intend in certain ways to benefit (...)
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  4. Benefiting From the Wrongdoing of Others.Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):363-376.
    Bracket out the wrong of committing a wrong, or conspiring or colluding or conniving with others in their committing one. Suppose you have done none of those things, and you find yourself merely benefiting from a wrong committed wholly by someone else. What, if anything, is wrong with that? What, if any, duties follow from it? If straightforward restitution were possible — if you could just ‘give back’ what you received as a result of the wrongdoing (...)
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  5.  24
    What is the Wrong in Retaining Benefits from Wrongdoing? How Recent Attempts to Formulate a Plausible Rationale for the ‘Beneficiary Pays Principle’ Have Failed.Sigurd Lindstad - 2020 - Res Publica 26 (1):25-43.
    Many moral and political theorists have recently argued that the fact that an agent has innocently benefited from wrongdoing or injustice can ground special moral duties to help out the victims or simply give up the benefits. This idea is often referred to as the ‘Beneficiary Pays Principle’. This article critically assesses three recent attempts at providing a rationale for the BPP and argues that there are profound problems with each of them. It argues that even if we (...)
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  6.  4
    Benefiting From Wrongdoing and Moral Protest.Sigurd Lindstad - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (3):753-765.
    Some normative theorists believe that there is a principled moral reason not to retain benefits realized by injustice or wrongdoing. However, critics have argued that this idea is implausible. One purported problem is that the idea lacks an obvious rationale and that attempts to provide one have been unconvincing. This paper articulates and defends the idea that the principled reason in question has an expressive quality: it gets its reason-giving force from the symbolic aptness of such an act (...)
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  7.  49
    Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):150–159.
    This paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law’s scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute and qualified (...)
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  8.  6
    Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position.Matti HÄyry Tuija Takala - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):150-159.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law's scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute and qualified (...)
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  9. On Benefiting From Injustice.Daniel Butt - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):129-152.
    How do we acquire moral obligations to others? The most straightforward cases are those where we acquire obligations as the result of particular actions which we voluntarily perform. If I promise you that I will trim your hedge, I face a moral Obligation to uphold my promise, and in the absence of some morally significant countervailing reason, I should indeed cut your hedge. Moral obligations which arise as a result of wrongdoing, as a function of corrective justice, are typically (...)
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  10.  48
    On Benefiting From Injustice.Daniel Butt - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):129-152.
    How do we acquire moral obligations to others? The most straightforward cases are those where we acquire obligations as the result of particular actions which we voluntarily perform. If I promise you that I will trim your hedge, I face a moral Obligation to uphold my promise, and in the absence of some morally significant countervailing reason, I should indeed cut your hedge. Moral obligations which arise as a result of wrongdoing, as a function of corrective justice, are typically (...)
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  11.  32
    The Normative Implications of Benefiting From Injustice.Bashshar Haydar & Gerhard Øverland - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):349-362.
    In this article we investigate whether non-culpably benefiting from wrongdoing or injustice generates a moral requirement to disgorge these benefits in order to compensate the victims. We argue that a strong requirement to disgorge such benefits is generated only if other conditions or factors are present. We identify three such factors and claim that their presence would explain why the normative features of certain types of cases of benefiting from wrongdoing differ from cases (...)
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  12.  56
    Fair Play and Wrongful Benefits.Avia Pasternak - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (5):515-534.
    _ Source: _Page Count 20 According to the fair play defense of political obligations citizens have a reciprocity-based duty to share the costs involved in the production of public goods. But sometimes, states produce collective goods through wrongdoing. For example, sometimes states’ wrongful immigration policies can contribute to the welfare of their own populations. Do citizens have duties of reciprocity in light of such wrongful benefits? I argue that the answer to this question is negative. Drawing on the observation (...)
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  13.  26
    Fair Play and Wrongful Benefits.Avia Pasternak - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Page Count 20 According to the fair play defense of political obligations citizens have a reciprocity-based duty to share the costs involved in the production of public goods. But sometimes, states produce collective goods through wrongdoing. For example, sometimes states’ wrongful immigration policies can contribute to the welfare of their own populations. Do citizens have duties of reciprocity in light of such wrongful benefits? I argue that the answer to this question is negative. Drawing on the observation (...)
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  14.  99
    Deserved Punishment and Benefits to Victims: C. L. Ten.C. L. Ten - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (1):85-90.
    Sher's notion of deserved punishment has unacceptable implications. It does not justify punishing some serious wrongdoers, who are unwilling to commit lesser wrongs, more severely than minor offenders. It requires victim-inflicted punishments which repeat the wrongdoings, with the roles reversed. But if Sher moves away from such victim-inflicted punishments, then his theory should treat wrongdoers like tort-feasors who have to pay monetary compensations to their victims.
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  15.  29
    Navigating Cross-Cultural Ethics: What Global Managers Do Right to Keep From Going Wrong.Eileen Morgan - 1998 - Butterworth-Heinemann.
    Through the personal stories of managers running global business, this book takes an inside look into the dilemmas of managers who are asked to make profits ethically according to the dictates of their company's ethics code. It examines what companies `think" they are doing to help managers in those situations and how those managers are actually affected. Thanks to the boost from the 1991 Sentencing Guidelines which minimizes penalties for companies with ethics codes caught in ethical wrongdoing, more (...)
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  16. Benefiting From Failures to Address Climate Change.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):392-404.
    The politics of climate change is marked by the fact that countries are dragging their heels in doing what they ought to do; namely, creating a binding global treaty, and fulfilling the duties assigned to each of them under it. Many different agents are culpable in this failure. But we can imagine a stylised version of the climate change case, in which no agents are culpable: if the bad effects of climate change were triggered only by crossing a particular threshold, (...)
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  17. Benefiting From Injustice and Brute Luck.Carl Knight - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):581-598.
    Many political philosophers maintain that beneficiaries of injustice are under special obligations to assist victims of injustice. However, the examples favoured by those who endorse this view equally support an alternative luck egalitarian view, which holds that special obligations should be assigned to those with good brute luck. From this perspective the distinguishing features of the benefiting view are (1) its silence on the question of whether to allocate special obligations to assist the brute luck worse off to (...)
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  18. Benefiting From Misfortune: When Harmless Actions Are Judged to Be Morally Blameworthy.David Pizarro - unknown
    Dominant theories of moral blame require an individual to have caused or intended harm. However, across four studies we demonstrate cases where no harm is caused or intended, yet individuals are nonetheless deemed worthy of blame. Specifically, individuals are judged to be blameworthy when they engage in actions that enable them to benefit from another’s misfortune (for example, betting that a company’s stock will decline or that a natural disaster will occur). We present evidence suggesting that perceptions of the (...)
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  19.  63
    The Moral Taintedness of Benefiting From Injustice.Tom Parr - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (4):985-997.
    It is common to focus on the duties of the wrongdoer in cases that involve injustice. Presumably, the wrongdoer owes her victim an apology for having wronged her and perhaps compensation for having harmed her. But, these are not the only duties that may arise. Are other beneficiaries of an injustice permitted to retain the fruits of the injustice? If not, who becomes entitled to those funds? In recent years, the Connection Account has emerged as an influential account that purports (...)
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  20.  15
    Benefiting From Climate Geoengineering and Corresponding Remedial Duties: The Case of Unforeseeable Harms.Clare Heyward - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):405-419.
    Many have argued that that it is morally wrong to benefit from an agent's culpable wronging of a third party. This thought has formed the basis of some arguments that agents can have duties to make up for wrongful acts by others that they could not have stopped, or that occurred before they were born. For example, it has been argued that those who benefited from slavery, colonialism and other shameful events in their nation's history should surrender those (...)
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  21.  37
    Benefiting From Injustice and the Common-Source Problem.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (5):1067-1081.
    According to the Beneficiary Pays Principle, innocent beneficiaries of an injustice stand in a special moral relationship with the victims of the same injustice. Critics have argued that it is normatively irrelevant that a beneficiary and a victim are connected in virtue of the same unjust 'source'. The aim of this paper is to defend the Beneficiary Pays Principle against this criticism. Locating the principle against the backdrop of corrective justice, it argues that the principle is correct in saying that (...)
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  22.  64
    Benefiting From 'Evil': An Incipient Moral Problem in Human Stem Cell Research.Ronald M. Green - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (6):544–556.
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  23. ‘A Doctrine Quite New and Altogether Untenable’: Defending the Beneficiary Pays Principle.Daniel Butt - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):336-348.
    This article explores the ethical architecture of the ‘beneficiary pays’ principle, which holds that agents can come to possess remedial obligations of corrective justice to others through the involuntary receipt of benefits stemming from injustice. Advocates of the principle face challenges of both persuasion and limitation in seeking to convince those unmoved of its normative force, and to explain in which cases of benefiting from injustice it does and does not give rise to rectificatory obligations. The article (...)
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  24.  55
    Benefiting From Unjust Acts and Benefiting From Injustice: Historical Emissions and the Beneficiary Pays Principle.Brian Berkey - 2017 - In Lukas Meyer & Pranay Sanklecha (eds.), Climate Justice and Historical Emissions. Cambridge University Press. pp. 123-140.
    It is commonly believed that the history of behavior that has contributed to the threat of climate change bears in a significant way on the obligations of current people. In particular, a number of philosophers have defended the Beneficiary Pays Principle, according to which those who have benefited from unjust emitting activity have a special obligation to bear costs of mitigation and adaptation. I claim that versions of the BPP that have been defended by others share a common problematic (...)
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  25.  4
    Who Benefits From Humor-Based Positive Psychology Interventions? The Moderating Effects of Personality Traits and Sense of Humor.Sara Wellenzohn, René T. Proyer & Willibald Ruch - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  26.  44
    Sharing in or Benefiting From Scientific Advancement?Cristian Timmermann - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):111-133.
    The intellectual property regimes we have currently in place are heavily under attack. One of the points of criticism is the interaction between two elements of article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the widely discussed issue of being able to benefit from scientific progress and the less argued for position of having a right to take part in scientific enterprises. To shine light on the question if we should balance the two elements or prioritize one of (...)
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  27.  73
    Have You Benefitted From Carbon Emissions? You May Be a “Morally Objectionable Free Rider”.J. Spencer Atkins - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (3):283-296.
    Much of the climate ethics discussion centers on considerations of compensatory justice and historical accountability. However, little attention is given to supporting and defending the Beneficiary Pays Principle as a guide for policymaking. This principle states that those who have benefitted from an instance of harm have an obligation to compensate those who have been harmed. Thus, this principle implies that those benefitted by industrialization and carbon emission owe compensation to those who have been harmed by climate change. Beneficiary (...)
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  28.  15
    Who Benefits From the Artificial Heart?Thomas A. Preston - 1985 - Hastings Center Report 15 (1):5-7.
  29.  19
    Benefitting From Bibliometry.J. Giske - 2008 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 8 (1):79-81.
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  30.  54
    Patient Expectations of Benefit From Phase I Clinical Trials: Linguistic Considerations in Diagnosing a Therapeutic Misconception.K. P. Weinfurt, Daniel P. Sulmasy, Kevin A. Schulman & Neal J. Meropol - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (4):329-344.
    The ethical treatment of cancer patientsparticipating in clinical trials requiresthat patients are well-informed about thepotential benefits and risks associated withparticipation. When patients enrolled in phaseI clinical trials report that their chance ofbenefit is very high, this is often taken as evidence of a failure of the informed consent process. We argue, however, that some simple themes from the philosophy of language may make such a conclusion less certain. First, the patient may receive conflicting statements from multiple speakers about (...)
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  31.  12
    Wise Reasoning Benefits From Emodiversity, Irrespective of Emotional Intensity.Igor Grossmann, Harrison Oakes & Henri C. Santos - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (5):805-823.
  32.  82
    Would SNOMED CT Benefit From Realism-Based Ontology Evolution?Werner Ceusters, Kent Spackman & Barry Smith - 2007 - AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings 2007:105-109.
    If SNOMED CT is to serve as a biomedical reference terminology, then steps must be taken to ensure comparability of information formulated using successive versions. New releases are therefore shipped with a history mechanism. We assessed the adequacy of this mechanism for its treatment of the distinction between changes occurring on the side of entities in reality and changes in our understanding thereof. We found that these two types are only partially distinguished and that a more detailed study is required (...)
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  33.  52
    Realizing Societal Benefit From Academic Research: Analysis of the National Science Foundation's Broader Impacts Criterion.Melanie R. Roberts - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):199-219.
    The National Science Foundation (NSF) evaluates grant proposals based on two criteria: intellectual merit and broader impacts. NSF gives applicants wide latitude to choose among a number of broader impacts, which include both benefits for the scientific community and benefits for society. This paper considers whether including potential societal benefits in the Broader Impacts Criterion leads to enhanced benefits for society. One prerequisite for realizing societal benefit is to transfer research results to potential users in a meaningful format. To determine (...)
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  34.  11
    How Scientists May 'Benefit From the Mess': A Resource Dependence Perspective on Individual Organizing in Contemporary Science.Olof Hallonsten - 2014 - Social Science Information 53 (3):341-362.
    There is general consensus in the study of science, and especially research policy studies, that a wave of profound change has struck academic science in the past decades. Central parts of this change are increased competition, growing demands of relevance and excellence, and managerialism reforms in institutions and policy systems. The underpinning thesis of this article is that, if seen from the perspective of individual scientists, these changes are exogenous and lead to greater environmental complexity and uncertainty, which in (...)
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  35.  3
    Inverted Faces Benefit From Whole-Face Processing.Jennifer Murphy, Katie L. H. Gray & Richard Cook - 2020 - Cognition 194:104105.
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  36. From Inaction to External Whistleblowing: The Influence of the Ethical Culture of Organizations on Employee Responses to Observed Wrongdoing[REVIEW]Muel Kaptein - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):513 - 530.
    Putting measures in place to prevent wrongdoing in organizations is important, but detecting and correcting wrongdoing are also vital. Employees who detect wrongdoing should, therefore, be encouraged to respond in a manner that supports corrective action. This article examines the influence of the ethical culture of organizations on employee responses to observed wrongdoing. Different dimensions of ethical culture are related to different types of intended responses. The findings show that several dimensions of ethical culture were negatively (...)
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  37.  17
    Writing Content Predicts Benefit From Written Expressive Disclosure: Evidence for Repeated Exposure and Self-Affirmation.Andrea N. Niles, Kate E. Byrne Haltom, Matthew D. Lieberman, Christopher Hur & Annette L. Stanton - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (2):258-274.
  38.  7
    Students and Teachers Benefit From Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in a School-Embedded Pilot Study.Sarah Gouda, Minh T. Luong, Stefan Schmidt & Joachim Bauer - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  39.  37
    Are East Asian Companies Benefiting From Western Board Practices?John Nowland - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1-2):133 - 150.
    Since the Asian crisis, East Asian nations have strived to introduce corporate governance codes, directing companies how to best improve their corporate governance practices. However, these codes have not been universally accepted by East Asian companies. This study examines the adoption of major board-related corporate governance recommendations by large nonfinancial companies in seven East Asian nations and investigates whether improvements in these board governance machanisms have been associated with increased operating performance and market value. The results indicate that family-owned companies (...)
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  40.  35
    Provider, Patient and Public Benefits From a NICE Appraisal of Bevacizumab (Avastin).Catherine Rhodes, John Harris, John Sulston & Catherine Spanswick - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):187-189.
    There are several good reasons for the UK Department of Health to recommend the appraisal of bevacizumab for the treatment of eye conditions by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. These reasons will extend to other drugs when similar situations arise in the future.
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  41.  2
    Who Benefits From Being an Only Child? A Study of Parent–Child Relationship Among Chinese Junior High School Students.Yixiao Liu & Quanbao Jiang - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    After more than three decades of implementation, China’s one-child policy has generated a large number of only children. Although extensive research has documented the developmental outcomes of being an only child, research on the parent–child relational quality of the only child is somewhat limited. Using China Education Panel Survey, this study examined whether the only child status was associated with parent–child relationships among Chinese junior high school students. It further explored whether children’s gender moderated the association between the only child (...)
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  42.  15
    Canadian Research Ethics Board Members’ Attitudes Toward Benefits From Clinical Trials.Kori Cook, Jeremy Snyder & John Calvert - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundWhile ethicists have for many years called for human subject trial participants and, in some cases, local community members to benefit from participation in pharmaceutical and other intervention-based therapies, little is known about how these discussions are impacting the practice of research ethics boards that grant ethical approval to many of these studies.MethodsTelephone interviews were conducted with 23 REB members from across Canada, a major funder country for human subject research internationally. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed (...)
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  43.  23
    Cognitive Benefits From a Musical Activity in Older Adults.Veronika Diaz Abrahan, Favio Shifres & Nadia Justel - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  44.  3
    Benefiting From Archives In New Turkish Literature Researches.İhsan Safi̇ - 2009 - Journal of Turkish Studies 4:263-292.
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  45.  22
    Who Benefits From the National Standards: A Response to Catherine M. Schmidt's" Who Benefits? Music Education and the National Standards.".Paul R. Lehman - forthcoming - Philosophy of Music Education Review 5 (1).
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  46.  2
    Who Benefits and How? Public Expectations of Public Benefits From Data-Intensive Health Research.Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Emily Creamer, Carol Porteous & Mhairi Aitken - 2018 - Big Data and Society 5 (2).
    The digitization of society and academic research endeavours have led to an explosion of interest in the potential uses of population data in research. Alongside this, increasing attention is focussing on the conditions necessary for maintaining a social license for research practices. Previous research has pointed to the importance of demonstrating “public benefits” from research for maintaining public support, yet there has been very little consideration of what the term “public benefits” means or what public expectations of “public benefits” (...)
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  47.  8
    How and When Socially Entrepreneurial Nonprofit Organizations Benefit From Adopting Social Alliance Management Routines to Manage Social Alliances?Gordon Liu, Wai Wai Ko & Chris Chapleo - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):497-516.
    Social alliance is defined as the collaboration between for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Building on the insights derived from the resource-based theory, we develop a conceptual framework to explain how socially entrepreneurial nonprofit organizations can improve their social alliance performance by adopting strategic alliance management routines. We test our framework using the data collected from 203 UK-based SENPOs in the context of cause-related marketing campaign-derived social alliances. Our results confirm a positive relationship between social alliance management routines and social (...)
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  48.  2
    Which Children Benefit From Letter Names in Learning Letter Sounds?Rebecca Treiman, Bruce F. Pennington, Lawrence D. Shriberg & Richard Boada - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1322-1338.
  49.  9
    May One Benefit From the Evil Deeds of Others?Albert S. Moraczewski - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (1):43-47.
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  50.  7
    Retrieval-Induced Facilitation: Initially Nontested Material Can Benefit From Prior Testing of Related Material.Jason C. K. Chan, Kathleen B. McDermott & Henry L. Roediger - 2006 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 135 (4):553-571.
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