Results for 'benevolence'

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  1.  57
    The Bridge of Benevolence: Hutcheson and Mencius.Alejandra Mancilla - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):57-72.
    The Scottish sentimentalist Francis Hutcheson and the Chinese Confucianist Mencius give benevolence (ren) a key place in their respective moral theories, as the first and foundational virtue. Leaving aside differences in style and method, my purpose in this essay is to underline this similarity by focusing on four common features: first, benevolence springs from compassion, an innate and universal feeling shared by all human beings; second, its objects are not only human beings but also animals; third, it is (...)
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  2.  20
    The Bridge of Benevolence: Hutcheson and Mencius. [REVIEW]Alejandra Mancilla - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy.
    The Scottish sentimentalist Francis Hutcheson and the Chinese Confucianist Mencius give benevolence (ren) a key place in their respectivemoral theories, as the first and foundational virtue. Leaving aside differences in style and method, my purpose in this essay is to underline this similarity by focusing on four common features: first, benevolence springs from compassion, an innate and universal feeling shared by all human beings; second, its objects are not only human beings but also animals; third, it is sensitive (...)
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  3.  7
    An Analysis of Motahhari and Brümmer’s Response to the Issue of God’s Mediation and Benevolence.Um Hani Jarrahi & Reza Akbari - 2019 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 20 (78):6-22.
    The teaching of mediation in Islamic tradition refers to a person requesting forgiveness of another and in the Christian tradition apart from forgiveness includes the bestowal of goodness to another as well. Motahhari and Brümmer consider the acceptance of mediation to be faced with the problem of superiority of the mediator’s mercy as compared to God’s mercy and the limitedness of God’s benevolence. Motahhari believes the answer to this problem to be in the attention to the hierarchy in the (...)
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  4.  65
    Hume and the Limits of Benevolence.Rico Vitz - 2002 - Hume Studies 28 (2):271-296.
    The purpose of this paper is to explain Hume’s account of the way both the scope and the degree of benevolent motivation is limited. I argue (i) that Hume consistently affirms, both in the Treatise and in the second Enquiry, that the scope of benevolent motivation is very broad, such that it includes any creature that is conscious and capable of thought, and (ii) that the degree of benevolent motivation is limited, such that a person is naturally inclined to feel (...)
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  5.  38
    What's Wrong with Benevolence: Happiness, Private Property, and the Limits of Enlightenment.D. C. Stove - 2011 - Encounter Books.
    In this insightful, provocative essay, Stove builds a case for the claim that when benevolence is universal, disinterested and external, it regularly leads to ...
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  6.  29
    Mencius' Refutation of Yang Zhu and Mozi and the Theoretical Implication of Confucian Benevolence and Love.Jinglin Li - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):155-178.
    Confucianism defined benevolence with “feelings” and “ love.” “Feelings” in Confucianism can be mainly divided into three categories: feelings in general, love for one’s relatives, and compassion. The seven kinds of feeling in which people respond to things can be summarized as “likes and dislikes.” The mind responds to things through feelings; based on the mind of benevolence and righteousness or feelings of compassion, the expression of feelings can conform to the principle of the mean and reach the (...)
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  7.  11
    Benevolence.Graeme C. Smith - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):91-93.
    This ironically titled novel depicts the ambiguity and ambivalence of making and receiving gifts. One of the main characters is a transplant psychiatrist who assesses potential living kidney donors. He struggles to understand his apparently altruistic patient and acts out this struggle in boundary violations. His wife, a psychologist, faces similar difficulties with a phobic, traumatised client and also acts out. This closely observed novel provides a valuable insight into the thoughts and feelings that therapists can have whilst with their (...)
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  8. The Values of Confucian Benevolence and the Universality of the Confucian Way of Extending Love.Guo Qiyong & Cui Tao - 2012 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (1):20-54.
  9.  21
    Mencius' Refutation of Yang Zhu and Mozi and the Theoretical Implication of Confucian Benevolence and Love.L. I. Jinglin - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):155-178.
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  10. The Concept of Benevolence: Aspects of Eighteenth-Century Moral Philosophy.Tom Aerwyn Roberts - 1973 - London: Macmillan.
  11. Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics.Ok-Sun An - 1997 - Peter Lang.
  12.  5
    Family-Based Consent for Organ Donation: Benevolence and Reconstructionist Confucianism.Yu Cai - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):573-587.
    This paper explores organ donation through the perspective of Reconstructionist Confucianism. I argue that for organ donation in China to be morally permissible, public policy must conform to the norms of Confucian benevolence. Reconstructionist Confucianism appreciates benevolence as an objectively important feature of morality deeply connected to moral rules governing propriety, integrity, righteousness, and human freedom. Here, benevolence involves sincere affection for another as an intrinsic good, rather than as a means to achieve other purposes. It requires (...)
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  13. Is God’s Benevolence Impartial?Robert K. Garcia - 2013 - Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):23-30.
    In this paper I consider the intuitive idea that God is fair and does not play favorites. This belief appears to be held by many theists. I will call it the Principle of Impartial Benevolence (PIB) and put it as follows: As much as possible, for all persons, God equally promotes the good and equally prevents the bad. I begin with the conviction that there is a prima facie tension between PIB and the disparity of human suffering. My aim (...)
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  14.  23
    Ethical Climate and Purchasing Social Responsibility: A Benevolence Focus. [REVIEW]Constantin Blome & Antony Paulraj - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):567-585.
    Using a sample of multinational firms in Germany, we develop and empirically examine a model to test the effects of ethical climate and its antecedents on purchasing social responsibility (PSR). Our results show different effects of benevolence dimensions of ethical climate on PSR: employee-focused climate has no effect, but community-focused climate is a significant driver of PSR. The results also show that top management ethical norms and code of conduct implementation impact PSR directly as well as indirectly through ethical (...)
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  15.  48
    I—On Benevolence.Nomy Arpaly - 2018 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 92 (1):207-223.
    It is widely agreed that benevolence is not the whole of the moral life, but it is not as widely appreciated that benevolence is an irreducible part of that life. This paper argues that Kantian efforts to characterize benevolence, or something like it, in terms of reverence for rational agency fall short. Such reverence, while credibly an important part of the moral life, is no more the whole of it than benevolence.
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  16.  38
    II—Kantian Benevolence.Erasmus Mayr - 2018 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 92 (1):225-245.
    Kantians may be unable to derive all of benevolence from reverence for rational agency, but the remaining lacuna is not as extensive as Arpaly thinks. For while we should take seriously Kantian worries about separating benevolence from reverence, a considerable part of benevolence can be explained in terms of reverence for rational agency on a plausible intepretation of the latter. Furthermore, Kantians have an irreducible role for benevolence within their ethics, which is different from the role (...)
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  17.  82
    Beneficence/Benevolence: WILLIAM K. FRANKENA.William K. Frankena - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):1-20.
    I begin with a note about moral goodness as a quality, disposition, or trait of a person or human being. This has at least two different senses, one wider and one narrower. Aristotle remarked that the Greek term we translate as justice sometimes meant simply virtue or goodness as applied to a person and sometimes meant only a certain virtue or kind of goodness. The same thing is true of our word “goodness.” Sometimes being a good person means having all (...)
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  18.  4
    The Impact of Authoritarian Leadership on Ethical Voice: A Moderated Mediation Model of Felt Uncertainty and Leader Benevolence.Yuyan Zheng, Les Graham, Jiing-Lih Farh & Xu Huang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    In a sample of 522 police officers and staff in an English police force, we investigated the role of authoritarian leadership in reducing the levels of employee ethical voice. Drawing upon uncertainty management theory, we found that authoritarian leadership was negatively related to employee ethical voice through increased levels of felt uncertainty, when the effects of a motivational-based mechanism suggested by previous studies were controlled. In addition, we found that the negative relationship between authoritarian leadership and employee ethical voice via (...)
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  19.  12
    Extensive Benevolence.John P. Reeder - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):47-70.
    In order to sketch an account of a moral commitment to persons as such, the essay examines empathy, sympathy, and benevolence as they arise first in special relations and then are reconstructed to include the stranger under the rubric of "extensive benevolence" or "universal love." The account, the author argues, must deal with conceptual empowerment and authorizing reasons, weakness and evil, normative conflict, and the relation of benevolence to justice.
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  20.  19
    Reconsidering Ren as Virtue and Benevolence.George Rudebusch - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):456-472.
    One reason why Confucius is preeminent among Chinese philosophers is his teaching about ren 仁. Interpreters have said many different things about ren, yet two basic assumptions are pervasive: that ren is a virtue and that ren is benevolence. I argue that it is more respectful to the text of the Analects to discard both assumptions. Instead of virtue, ren is a priority in one's motives. Instead of benevolence, ren is humane courtesy.
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  21.  8
    Formal and Informal Benevolence in a Profit-Oriented Context.Guillaume Mercier & Ghislain Deslandes - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Faced with the disenchantment and disengagement expressed by their employees, business leaders are considering ways of incorporating more benevolence into managerial practices. Nevertheless, ‘benevolence’—care and concern for the well-being of others—has not yet been studied in an organizational profit-focused context. In this paper, we seek to investigate the emergence and practice of benevolence with an eye on profit and performance. We begin by investigating the main ethical approaches to benevolence—virtue ethical, utilitarian, and deontological. Then, based on (...)
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  22.  83
    Benevolence, Justice, Well-Being and the Health Gradient.Daniel M. Hausman - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (3):235-243.
    The health gradient among those who are by historical standards both remarkably healthy and well-off is of considerable moral importance with respect to benevolence, justice and the theory of welfare. Indeed it may help us to realize that for most people the good life lies in close and intricate social ties with others which can flourish only when inequalities are limited. The health gradient suggests that there is a story to be told in which egalitarian justice, solidarity, health and (...)
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  23.  22
    Buddhist Virtue, Voluntary Poverty, and Extensive Benevolence.Donald K. Swearer - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):71-103.
    Complementing recent studies by Keown, Whitehill, and Hallisey that associate Buddhist ethics with the virtue tradition, the author proposes that Buddhist virtue requires both overcoming attachment to self and compassionate regard for others. Within a broader framework of comparative religious ethics, such a claim is not extraordinary; overcoming prudentialist self-interest, cultivating sympathy, and acting on others' behalf are ethical values highly praised by most religious traditions, including Buddhism. Nevertheless, this proposal runs counter to those who hold Theravāda Buddhism to be (...)
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  24.  1
    Is the Adulation of the Rich-and-Powerful Derived From Benevolence? Adam Smith and the Distinction Between Aspiration and Interests.Elias L. Khalil - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (4):285-304.
    ABSTRACTWhat is the source of the adulation of the rich-and-powerful? It cannot be benevolence. But then what is the criterion that delineates adulation from benevolence? This paper argues that the criterion resides in the set of inputs of the utility function: Does the set includes only interests, i.e. bundles of goods and resources? If so, the product is benevolence. But if the set includes aspiration, i.e. the desire to attain some imagined higher station, the product is adulation. (...)
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  25.  48
    Simulating Benevolence: Obstructing Systemic Problem Solving.Ellen Urell - 2006 - World Futures 62 (7):524 – 532.
    Traditional methods of evaluating and solving world problems are insufficient to deal with today's issues, which are complex and interconnected, and therefore cannot be understood, or solved, in isolation. The author's study aimed to better understand behaviors that impact systemic problems in the capacity-building community. The resultant theory of simulating benevolence conceptualizes a collection of behaviors where change agents undertake activities that are not in the best interest of community members. Instead, activities satisfy the need for activity, involvement, and (...)
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  26.  13
    The Link Between Benevolence and Well-Being in the Context of Human-Resource Marketing.Catherine Viot & Laïla Benraiss-Noailles - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (3):883-896.
    Although interest in the subject of human-resource marketing is growing among researchers and practitioners, there have been remarkably few studies on the effects on employees of how benevolent their organization is. This article looks at the link between the presumption of organizational benevolence and the well-being of employees at work. The results of an empirical study of 595 employees show that the presumption of organizational benevolence is positively linked to employee well-being. The effect is indirect, as it is (...)
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  27.  33
    Autonomy, Benevolence, and Alzheimer's Disease.Pam R. Sailors - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):184-193.
    Medical ethics has traditionally been governed by two guiding, but sometimes conflicting, principlesthe Substituted Judgment Standard shows our concern for autonomy, whereas the Best Interest Standard shows our commitment to benevolence. Both standards are vulnerable to criticisms. Further, the principles can seem to offer conflicting prescriptions for action. The criticisms and conflict figure prominently in discussion of advance directive decisionmaking and Alzheimer's disease. After laying out each of the current standards and its problems, with Alzheimer's issues as my central (...)
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  28.  17
    Revolutionary Writing, Moral Philosophy, and Universal Benevolence in the Eighteenth Century.Evan Radcliffe - 1993 - Journal of the History of Ideas 54 (2):221.
    Of all the Enlightenment questions reopened in Britain by the French Revolution, none was more hotly debated and none became more politically charged than universal benevolence -the ideathat benevolence and sympathy can be extended to all humanity. Inthe British controversy overthe Revolution, issues that had been argued by eighteenth-century moral philosophers surfaced not only with a new urgency but also with a fresh sense of possible political and social implications; taking a stance on universal benevolence quickly came (...)
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  29.  52
    A Humean Argument for Benevolence to Strangers.Catherine Wilson - 2003 - The Monist 86 (3):454-468.
    Hume is not known for his theory of the benevolence we owe to distant strangers. One might suppose that he would deny that an obligation so contrary to our natural habits and predilections could be well-founded.
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  30.  12
    Altruism, Benevolence and Culture.Leonard Nunney - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    Human cultural groups appear well designed, but is this apparent design due to altruism or due to self-serving behaviours? Sober and Wilson argue that human cultures are founded on group-selected altruism. This argument assumes that individually selected self-serving traits are not being misidentified as altruistic. A simple definition of individual selection suggests that Sober and Wilson fail to separate one such trait, called benevolence, from altruism. Benevolent individuals act selfishly but provide an incidental benefit to their neighbours. The female-biased (...)
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  31.  60
    Spinoza's Benevolence: The Rational Basis for Acting to the Benefit of Others.Matthew J. Kisner - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 549-567.
    This paper is concerned with Spinoza’s treatment of a problem in early modern moral philosophy: the potential conflict between the pursuit of happiness and virtue. The problem is that people are thought to attain happiness by pursuing their self-interest, whereas virtue requires them to act with benevolence, for the benefit of others. Given the inevitability that people will have different and often competing interests, how can they be both virtuous and happy and, where the two are in conflict, which (...)
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  32.  7
    Egoism and Benevolence[REVIEW]Tibor R. Machan - 2000 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 1 (2):283 - 291.
    TIBOR R. MACHAN argues that David Kelley's Unrugged Individualism: The Selfish Basis of Benevolence, which makes the case for including the benevolent virtues as a prominent feature of the Objectivist ethics, is too brief but filled with poignant observations and some valuable analysis. Machan discusses altruism, in response to much criticism of Rand's rendition of the position, and defends ethical egoism against widespread misrepresentations.
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  33.  40
    Guo, Xiaodong 郭曉東, Comprehending Benevolence and Controlling Human Proclivity: A Study of Cheng Mingdao’s Philosophy From the Perspective of Moral Cultivation 識仁與定性 : 功夫論視域下的程明道哲學研究.Tze-ki Hon - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):113-114.
    Guo, Xiaodong 郭曉東, Comprehending Benevolence and Controlling Human Proclivity : A Study of Cheng Mingdao’s Philosophy from the Perspective of Moral Cultivation 識仁與定性 : 功夫論視域下的程明道哲學研究 Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-009-9143-8 Authors Tze-ki Hon, State University of New York, SUNY-Geneseo History Department 1 College Circle Geneseo NY 14454 USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 1.
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  34.  11
    Impartial Benevolence and Partial Love.Timothy Chappell - unknown
    ‘Impartial benevolence and partial love’ contributes, like the other essays in the edited collection ‘The Problem of Moral Demandingness’, to the discussion of that problem. Its contribution is to offer a phenomenological exploration of the place that these two ideas/ ideals actually have in our ethical life and experience. On the basis of this exploration I argue that neither ideal, neither impartial benevolence nor partial love, comprehensively “trumps” the other — both are important, and more to the point, (...)
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  35.  22
    Benevolence: A Minor Virtue.John Kekes - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):21.
    Morality requires us to act for the good of others. This is not the only moral requirement there is, and it is, of course, controversial where the good of others lies. But whatever their good is, there can be no serious doubt that acting so as to bring it about is one crucial obligation morality places on us. Yet the nature of this obligation is unclear, because there are difficult questions about its aim and about the motivational sources required for (...)
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  36.  22
    The Protestant Ethic and Rockefeller Benevolence: The Religious Impulse in American Philanthropy.Soma Hewa - 1997 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 27 (4):419–452.
    This paper is an application of Max Weber’s thesis about the “elective affinity” between Protestant religious impulses and the rise of capitalism, and rationalization of benevolence. Exploring the history of organized philanthropy in the United States, using the life and work of John D. Rockefeller, the paper presents the power of the religious motive in Rockefeller’s commitment to philanthropy, especially towards support for scientific university based research in medicine. Presenting historical evidence, the paper argues against those who see U.S. (...)
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  37.  6
    Benevolence: A Minor Virtue: John Kekes.John Kekes - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):21-36.
    Morality requires us to act for the good of others. This is not the only moral requirement there is, and it is, of course, controversial where the good of others lies. But whatever their good is, there can be no serious doubt that acting so as to bring it about is one crucial obligation morality places on us. Yet the nature of this obligation is unclear, because there are difficult questions about its aim and about the motivational sources required for (...)
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  38.  6
    Benevolence, Special Relations, and Voluntary Poverty: An Introduction.John P. Reeder - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):3-15.
    This cluster of essays by Julia E. Judish, John P. Reeder Jr., Donald K. Swearer, and Lee H. Yearley considers benevolence as a virtue construed in various ways in different traditions. The essays explore: the roots of benevolence or caring, especially towards strangers; the normative issue of the relation between universal love and concern for particular others in special relations; and the question of possessions, in particular the ideal of voluntary poverty. A theme that runs throughout the essays (...)
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  39. Thoughtful Economic Man: Essays on Rationality, Moral Rules and Benevolence.J. Gay Tulip Meeks (ed.) - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays by celebrated authors in this 1991 book cover themes fundamental to economics: the influence of benevolence, altruism, justice and religious principles in our treatment of others in society; and the bases of rationality in decision making under conditions of uncertainty. These common themes are given a wide range of perspectives by the contributors, who discuss whether not just a 'rational' but also a 'thoughtful' economic man can be fitted into a sophisticated version of the orthodox model of (...)
     
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  40.  10
    The Influence of Ability, Benevolence, and Integrity in Trust Between Managers and Subordinates: The Role of Ethical Reasoning.Álvaro Lleó de Nalda, Manuel Guillén & Ignacio Gil Pechuán - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (4):556-576.
    Numerous researchers have examined the antecedents of trust between managers and subordinates. Recent studies conclude that their influence varies depending on whether what is being examined is a manager's trust in a subordinate or a subordinate's trust in a manager. However, the reasons given to justify this phenomenon present limitations. This article offers a new theoretical approach that relates the influence of each antecedent to Aristotelian forms of reasoning, ethical, and instrumental. The proposed approach shows that the influence of each (...)
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  41.  36
    Paternalistic Intervention: The Moral Bounds on Benevolence.Donald Vandeveer - 1986 - Princeton University Press.
    These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions.
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  42. Review Article : Happiness and Benevolence, by Robert Spaemann, Trans. Jeremiah Albergh. Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 2000. 229 Pp. Pb. £14.95. ISBN 0-567-08740-9. [REVIEW]Holger Zaborowski - 2001 - Studies in Christian Ethics 14 (2):109-118.
  43.  17
    No More Charity, Please! Enthymematic Parsimony and the Pitfall of Benevolence.Fabio Paglieri - 2007 - In Christopher W. Tindale Hans V. Hansen (ed.), Dissensus and the Search for Common Ground. Ossa. pp. 1--26.
    Why are enthymemes so frequent? Are we dumb arguers, smart rhetoricians, or parsimonious reasoners? This paper investigates systematic use of enthymemes, criticizing the application of the principle of charity to their interpretation. In contrast, I propose to analyze enthymematic argumentation in terms of parsimony, i.e. as a manifestation of the rational tendency to economize over scant resources. Consequences of this view on the current debate on enthymemes and on their rational reconstruction are discussed.
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  44. Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism.Sallie B. King - 2005 - University of Hawaiì Press.
    Building from tradition -- Engaged Buddhist ethical theory -- Individual and society -- Human rights -- Nonviolence and its limits -- Justice/reconciliation.
     
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  45.  5
    How Do Children Weigh Competence and Benevolence When Deciding Whom to Trust?Angie M. Johnston, Candice M. Mills & Asheley R. Landrum - 2015 - Cognition 144:76-90.
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  46.  6
    A General Benevolence Dimension That Links Neural, Psychological, Economic, and Life-Span Data on Altruistic Tendencies.Jason Hubbard, William T. Harbaugh, Sanjay Srivastava, David Degras & Ulrich Mayr - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (10):1351-1358.
  47. Sympathy and Benevolence in Hume's Moral Psychology.Rico Vitz - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):261-275.
    In this paper, I argue that Hume’s account of sympathy is substantially unchanged from the Treatise to the second Enquiry. I show that Hume uses the term ‘sympathy’ to refer to three different mental phenomena (a psychological mechanism or principle, a sentiment, and a conversion process) and that he consistently refers to sympathy as a cause of benevolent motivation. I attempt to resolve an apparent difficulty regarding sympathy and humanity by explaining how each is an ‘original principle’ in Hume’s sense. (...)
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  48.  18
    Butchering Benevolence Moral Progress Beyond the Expanding Circle.Hanno Sauer - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (1):153-167.
    Standard evolutionary explanations seem unable to account for inclusivist shifts that expand the circle of moral concern beyond strategically relevant cooperators. Recently, Allen Buchanan and Russell Powell have argued that this shows that that evolutionary conservatism – the view that our inherited psychology imposes significant feasibility constraints on how much inclusivist moral progress can be achieved – is unjustified. Secondly, they hold that inclusivist gains can be sustained, and exclusivist tendencies curbed, under certain favorable socio-economic conditions. I argue that Buchanan (...)
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  49.  5
    The Altruistic Species: Scientific, Philosophical, and Religious Perspectives of Human Benevolence.Andrew Michael Flescher & Daniel L. Worthen - 2007 - Templeton Press.
    In The Altruistic Species, Andrew Michael Flescher and Daniel L. Worthen explore these questions through the lenses of four disciplinary perspectives—biology, psychology, philosophy, and religion.
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  50. Mutual Benevolence and the Theory of Happiness.David M. Estlund - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):187-204.
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