Results for 'biodiversity'

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  1. What is Biodiversity?James Maclaurin & Kim Sterelny - 2008 - University of Chicago Press.
    What Is Biodiversity? is a theoretical and conceptual exploration of the biological world and how diversity is valued. Maclaurin and Sterelny explore not only the origins of the concept of biodiversity, but also how that concept has been shaped by ecology and more recently by conservation biology. They explain the different types of biodiversity important in evolutionary theory, developmental biology, ecology, morphology and taxonomy and conclude that biological heritage is rich in not just one biodiversity but (...)
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  2. Ecological Hierarchy and Biodiversity.Christopher Lean & Kim Sterelny - 2016 - In Justin Garson, Anya Plutynski & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity. London: Routledge. pp. 56 - 68.
  3.  52
    Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction.Sahotra Sarkar - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the epistemological and ethical issues at the foundations of environmental philosophy, emphasising the conservation of biodiversity. Sahota Sarkar criticises attempts to attribute intrinsic value to nature and defends an anthropocentric position on biodiversity conservation based on an untraditional concept of transformative value. Unlike other studies in the field of environmental philosophy, this book is as much concerned with epistemological issues as with environmental ethics. It covers a broad range of topics, including problems of explanation and (...)
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  4. The Idea of Biodiversity: Philosophies of Paradise.David Takacs - 1996 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    "At places distant from where you are, but also uncomfortably close," writes David Takacs, "a holocaust is under way. People are slashing, hacking, bulldozing, burning, poisoning, and otherwise destroying huge swaths of life on Earth at a furious pace." And a cadre of ecologists and conservation biologists has responded, vigorously promoting a new definition of nature: biodiversity --advocating it in Congress and on the Tonight Show; whispering it into the ears of foreign leaders redefining the boundaries of science and (...)
     
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  5. Microbial Diversity and the “Lower-Limit” Problem of Biodiversity.Christophe Malaterre - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):219-239.
    Science is now studying biodiversity on a massive scale. These studies are occurring not just at the scale of larger plants and animals, but also at the scale of minute entities such as bacteria and viruses. This expansion has led to the development of a specific sub-field of “microbial diversity”. In this paper, I investigate how microbial diversity faces two of the classical issues encountered by the concept of “ biodiversity ”: the issues of defining the units of (...)
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  6. Save the Planet: Eliminate Biodiversity.Carlos Santana - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (6):761-780.
    Recent work in the philosophy of biology has attempted to clarify and defend the use of the biodiversity concept in conservation science. I argue against these views, and give reasons to think that the biodiversity concept is a poor fit for the role we want it to play in conservation biology on both empirical and conceptual grounds. Against pluralists, who hold that biodiversity consists of distinct but correlated properties of natural systems, I argue that the supposed correlations (...)
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  7. Food Security and Biodiversity: Can We Have Both? An Agroecological Analysis. [REVIEW]Michael Jahi Chappell & Liliana A. LaValle - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):3-26.
    We present an extensive literature review exploring the relationships between food insecurity and rapid biodiversity loss, and the competing methods proposed to address each of these serious problems. Given a large and growing human population, the persistence of widespread malnutrition, and the direct and significant threats the expanding agricultural system poses to biodiversity, the goals of providing universal food security and protecting biodiversity seem incompatible. Examining the literature shows that the current agricultural system already provides sufficient food (...)
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  8.  54
    Ethical Considerations in Agro-Biodiversity Research, Collecting, and Use.Johannes M. M. Engels, Hannes Dempewolf & Victoria Henson-Apollonio - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (2):107-126.
    Humans have always played a crucial role in the evolutionary dynamics of agricultural biodiversity and thus there is a strong relationship between these resources and human cultures. These agricultural resources have long been treated as a global public good, and constitute the livelihoods of millions of predominantly poor people. At the same time, agricultural biodiversity is under serious threat in many parts of the world despite extensive conservation efforts. Ethical considerations regarding the collecting, research, and use of agricultural (...)
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  9.  33
    In Defence of Biodiversity.Joanna Burch-Brown & Alfred Archer - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):969-997.
    The concept of biodiversity has played a central role within conservation biology over the last thirty years. Precisely how it should be understood, however, is a matter of ongoing debate. In this paper we defend what we call a classic multidimensional conception of biodiversity. We begin by introducing two arguments for eliminating the concept of biodiversity from conservation biology, both of which have been put forward in a recent paper by Santana. The first argument is against the (...)
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  10.  69
    Sharing the Benefits of Genetic Resources: From Biodiversity to Human Genetics.Doris Schroeder & Carolina Lasen-Diaz - 2006 - Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):135–143.
    Benefit sharing aims to achieve an equitable exchange between the granting of access to a genetic resource and the provision of compensation. The Convention on Biological Diversity, adopted at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, is the only international legal instrument setting out obligations for sharing the benefits derived from the use of biodiversity. The CBD excludes human genetic resources from its scope, however, this article considers whether it should be expanded to include those resources, so as (...)
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  11.  24
    The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity.Justin Garson, Anya Plutynski & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    Biological diversity - or ‘biodiversity’ - is the degree of variation of life within an ecosystem. It is a relatively new topic of study but has grown enormously in recent years. Because of its interdisciplinary nature the very concept of biodiversity is the subject of debate amongst philosophers, biologists, geographers and environmentalists. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity is an outstanding reference source to the key topics and debates in this exciting subject. Comprising twenty-three chapters by (...)
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  12.  46
    Promoting Biodiversity.Christopher Gyngell & Julian Savulescu - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):413-426.
    Advances in biotechnology mean that it may soon be possible to recreate previously extinct species. This has led to an emerging debate within bioethics about whether we ought to reintroduce extinct species into our ecosystems. In this paper, we discuss the role that biodiversity could play in this debate. Many believe that biodiversity is a good that should be protected. We argue that if biodiversity is a good, then this suggests it should also be promoted, including by (...)
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  13.  68
    Semantics in Support of Biodiversity: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies.Ramona L. Walls, John Deck, Robert Guralnik, Steve Baskauf, Reed Beaman, Stanley Blum, Shawn Bowers, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Neil Davies, Dag Endresen, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Robert Hanner, Alyssa Janning, Barry Smith & Others - 2014 - PLoS ONE 9 (3):1-13.
    The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection and measurement protocols. A review of the current landscape of metadata standards and ontologies in biodiversity science suggests that existing standards such as the Darwin Core terminology are inadequate for describing biodiversity data in a semantically meaningful and computationally useful way. Existing ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and others (...)
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  14.  61
    Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity.Joachim Boldt - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are (...)
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  15.  4
    Biocentric Individualism and Biodiversity Conservation: An Argument From Parsimony.Patrik Baard - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    I will argue that holistic ecocentrism unnecessarily introduces elements to explain why we ought to halt biodiversity loss. I will suggest that atomistic accounts can justify the same conclusion by utilising fewer elements. Hence, why we ought to preserve biodiversity can be made reasonable without adding elements such as intrinsic values of ecosystems or moral obligations to conserve collectives of organisms. Between two equally good explanations of the same phenomenon, the explanation utilising fewer elements, which speaks in favour (...)
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  16.  34
    Indicators of Biodiversity and Conservational Wildlife Quality on Danish Organic Farms for Use in Farm Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Indicator Development and Testing. [REVIEW]Egon Noe, Niels Halberg & Jens Reddersen - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (4):383-414.
    Organic farming is expected to contribute to conserving national biodiversity on farms, especially remnant, old, and undisturbed small biotopes, forests, and permanent grassland. This objective cannot rely on the legislation of organic farming solely, and to succeed, farmers need to understand the goals behind it. A set of indicators with the purpose of facilitating dialogues between expert and farmer on wildlife quality has been developed and tested on eight organic farms. “Weed cover in cereal fields,” was used as an (...)
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  17.  53
    Philosophy and Biodiversity.Markku Oksanen & Juhani Pietarinen (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This important collection focuses on the nature and importance of biodiversity. The concept is clarified and its intrinsic and instrumental value are discussed. Even though the term biodiversity was invented in the 1980s to promote the cause of species conservation, discussions on biological diversity go back to Plato. There are many controversies surrounding biodiversity and a few of them are examined here: What is worthy of protection or restoration and what is the acceptable level of costs? Is (...)
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  18.  67
    Biodiversity, Biopiracy and Benefits: What Allegations of Biopiracy Tell Us About Intellectual Property.Chris Hamilton - 2006 - Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):158–173.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines the concept of biopiracy, which initially emerged to challenge various aspects of the regime for intellectual property rights in living organisms, as well as related aspects pertaining to the ownership and apportioning of benefits from ‘genetic resources’ derived from the world’s biodiversity.This paper proposes that we take the allegation of biopiracy seriously due to the impact it has as an intervention which indexes a number of different, yet interrelated, problematizations of biodiversity, biotechnology and IPR. Using (...)
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  19.  77
    Addressing a Duty to Preserve Biodiversity, Not Genetic Integrity.Cristian Timmermann - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):262-264.
    Rohwer and Marris (2015) question the existence of a prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity leaving open the question of what we should preserve. Many of the arguments used to justify their position could set the platform to defend a duty to preserve the diversity of both wild and domesticated species. In times where agricultural land covers a third of world’s land area and major efforts are undertaken to green urban areas a defense of biodiversity could benefit hugely (...)
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  20.  23
    Regarding Biocultural Heritage: In Situ Political Ecology of Agricultural Biodiversity in the Peruvian Andes. [REVIEW]T. Garrett Graddy - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):587-604.
    This paper emerges from and aims to contribute to conversations on agricultural biodiversity loss, value, and renewal. Standard international responses to the crisis of agrobiodiversity erosion focus mostly on ex situ preservation of germplasm, with little financial and strategic support for in situ cultivation. Yet, one agrarian collective in the Peruvian Andes—the Parque de la Papa (Parque)—has repatriated a thousand native potatoes from the gene bank in Lima so as to catalyze in situ regeneration of lost agricultural biodiversity (...)
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  21. Functional Biodiversity and the Concept of Ecological Function.Antoine C. Dussault - 2019 - In Elena Casetta, Davide Vecchi & Jorge Miguel Luz Marques da Silva (eds.), From Assessing to Conserving biodiversity: Beyond the Species Approach. Dordrecht, Pays-Bas: Springer. pp. 297-316.
    This chapter argues that the common claim that the ascription of ecological functions to organisms in functional ecology raises issues about levels of natural selection is ill-founded. This claim, I maintain, mistakenly assumes that the function concept as understood in functional ecology aligns with the selected effect theory of function advocated by many philosophers of biology (sometimes called “The Standard Line” on functions). After exploring the implications of Wilson and Sober’s defence of multilevel selection for the prospects of defending a (...)
     
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  22.  24
    Agriculture and Biodiversity: Finding Our Place in This World. [REVIEW]Jeffrey A. Lockwood - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (4):365-379.
    Agriculture has been recently viewed as the primary destructive force of biodiversity, but the places that produce our food and fiber may also hold the key to saving the richness of life on earth. This argument is based on three fundamental positions. First, it is argued that to value and thereby preserve and restore biodiversity we must begin by employing anthropocentric ethics. While changing our understanding of intrinsic values (i.e., the unconditional values of biodiversity as a state (...)
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  23.  19
    The Significance of Enset Culture and Biodiversity for Rural Household Food and Livelihood Security in Southwestern Ethiopia.Almaz Negash & Anke Niehof - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):61-71.
    The significance of enset for thefood and livelihood security of ruralhouseholds in Southwestern Ethiopia, where thiscrop is the main staple, raises two majorquestions. The first concerns the relatedissues of household food security andlivelihood security and the contribution of theenset farming and food system in achievingthese. The second deals with the issue ofbiodiversity in enset cultivation. What roledoes biodiversity play in food and livelihoodsecurity and how is it perceived and measured?To answer the latter question, it is necessaryto look at the (...)
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  24.  62
    Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement. [REVIEW]Ana Delgado - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), possibly (...)
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  25.  54
    Maize: The Native North American’s Legacy of Cultural Diversity and Biodiversity[REVIEW]S. K. Wertz - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2):131-156.
    Recent research has focused on establishing the values of preserving biodiversity both in agriculture and in less managed ecosystems, and in showing the importance of the role of cultural diversity in preserving biodiversity in food production systems. A study of the philosophy embedded in cultural systems can reveal the importance of the technological information for preserving genetic biodiversity contained in such systems and can be used to support arguments for the protection/preservation of cultural diversity. For example, corn (...)
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  26.  28
    Gender, Rural Households, and Biodiversity in Native Mexico.Isidro Rimarachín Cabrera, Emma Zapata Martelo & Verónica Vázquez García - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):85-93.
    Knowledge about maize varieties is the key to rural households' survival in native Mexico. Native peoples relate to nature in particular ways and they play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity. This paper discusses the relationship between native women's accumulated knowledge on maize varieties and the laboratory analysis of the species that they manage. Fieldwork was conducted in an Otomí community, San Pablo Arriba, located in the state of Mexico.
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  27.  69
    Biodiversity Loss, the Motivational Gap, and the Failure of Conservation Education.William Grove-Fanning - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):119-130.
    While the precipitous decline of biodiversity threatens life-sustaining processes and vast segments of the human population, concern about its loss remains extremely shallow. Nearly all motivational campaigns falsely assume that upon appreciating the relevant information, people will be sufficiently motivated to do something. But rational argumentation is doomed to fail, for there exists a motivational gap between a comprehension of the crisis and action taken based upon such knowledge. The origin of the gap lies neither in the quantity and (...)
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  28.  35
    Religião, Biodiversidade e Território (Religion, Biodiversity and Territory) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p439.Pedro Assis Ribeiro de Oliveira - 2013 - Horizonte 11 (30):439-442.
    Editorial - Religião, Biodiversidade e Território. Dossiê: Religião, Biodiversidade e Território (Dossier: Religion, Biodiversity and Territory).
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  29.  52
    Agro-Biodiversity Conservation in Europe: Ethical Issues. [REVIEW]Valeria Negri - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (1):3-25.
    While it is commonly acknowledged that the ecosystemic, and the inter- and intra-specific diversity of natural life is under threat of being irremediably lost, there is much less awareness that the diversity in agro-ecosystems is also under threat. This paper is focused on the biodiverse agro-ecosystems generated by landraces (LRs), i.e., farmer-developed populations of cultivated species that show among- and within-population diversity and are linked to traditional cultures. The aim of this work is to arouse concern about their loss, to (...)
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  30.  25
    Conservation of Biodiversity Within Canadian Agricultural Landscapes: Integrating Habitat for Wildlife. [REVIEW]Pierre Mineau & Alison McLaughlin - 1996 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (2):93-113.
    Industrialized agriculture currently substitutes many of the ecological functions of soil micro-organisms, macroinvertebrates, wild plants, and vertebrate animals with high cost inputs of pesticides and fertilizers. Enhanced biological diversity potentially offers agricultural producers a means of reducing the cost of their production. Conservation of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes may be greatly enhanced by the adoption of certain crop management practices, such as reduced pesticide usage or measures to prevent soil erosion. Still, the vast monocultures comprising the crop area in (...)
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  31.  18
    Herbicide Resistance: Promises and Prospects of Biodiversity for European Agriculture. [REVIEW]Gesine Schütte - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):217-230.
    Diverse opinion papers related tothe question whether environmental benefits canbe achieved by the herbicide resistancetechnique have been published. But onlylong-term and large-scale field tests usingdifferent weed control methods and additionalagricultural vegetation surveys make itpossible to compare biodiversity effects ofdifferent strategies. A description of theamounts and frequencies of herbicideapplications, their direct and indirecteffects, and the impacts of farming practiceproves that the cropping history oftencompensates effects of an actual farmingpractice. The decline of beneficial plantspecies with all its negative side effects onbiodiversity (...)
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  32.  21
    Civilização do mangue: biodiversidade e populações tradicionais (Mangrove's Civilization: Biodiversity and traditional populations) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p509. [REVIEW]Deis Elucy Siqueira - 2013 - Horizonte 11 (30):509-544.
    O texto parte do reconhecimento da importância das populações tradicionais na conservação da biodiversidade, tanto em termos históricos quanto em projetos socioambientais baseados no paradigma da sustentabilidade. Foca a civilização do mangue do Salgado Paraense e, em particular, as comunidades da Reserva Extrativista de Caeté-Taperaçu (município de Bragança/PA). Destaca aspectos de sua territorialidade em articulação com sua religiosidade, na qual são tratados os santos e, sobretudo, os encantes (xamanismo caboclo). A partir desta religiosidade (crenças, superstições, lendas), a discussão se centraliza (...)
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  33.  15
    Biodiversidade, política e religião (Biodiversity, politics, religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p7.Leonardo Boff - 2010 - Horizonte 8 (17):7-10.
    Editorial - Dossiê: Biodiversidade, Política e Religião - (Dossier: Biodiversity, Politics and Religion) Biodiversidade, política e religião (Biodiversity, politics, religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p7.
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  34.  93
    Biodiversity at Twenty-Five Years: Revolution Or Red Herring?Nicolae Morar, Ted Toadvine & Brendan J. M. Bohannan - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (1):16-29.
  35.  55
    The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW]Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.
    Americans’ excessive consumption of food harms their health and quality of life and also causes direct and indirect environmental degradation, through habitat loss and increased pollution from agricultural fertilizers and pesticides. We show here that reducing food consumption could improve Americans’ health and well-being while facilitating environmental benefits ranging from establishing new national parks and protected areas to allowing more earth-friendly farming and ranching techniques. We conclude by considering various public policy initiatives to lower per capita caloric intake and excessive (...)
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  36.  44
    Speciation and the Neutral Theory of Biodiversity.Michael Kopp - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (7):564-570.
  37.  26
    A Systemic View of Biodiversity and its Conservation: Processes, Interrelationships, and Human Culture.Eleanor J. Sterling, Andrés Gómez & Ana L. Porzecanski - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (12):1090-1098.
  38.  62
    Biodiversity, Biological Uncertainty, and Setting Conservation Priorities.K. S. Shrader-Frechette & E. D. Mccoy - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):167-195.
    In a world of massive extinctions where not all taxa can be saved, how ought biologists to decide their preservation priorities? When biologists make recommendations regarding conservation, should their analyses be based on scientific criteria, on public or lay criteria, on economic or some other criteria? As a first step in answering this question, we examine the issue of whether biologists ought to try to save the endangered Florida panther, a well known glamour taxon. To evaluate the merits of panther (...)
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  39.  33
    Biodiversity Surgery: Some Epistemological Challenges in Facing Extinction.Elena Casetta & Jorge Marques da Silva - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (3):239-251.
    Biological conservation has a long story, but what distinguishes Conservation Biology from previous conservation fields is its multidisciplinary scope and its character as a mission-oriented crisis discipline. These characteristics suggested the introduction of the metaphor of biological conservation as a sort of surgery. This paper is about the initial stages of such surgery. Firstly, some data about the so-called “Big Sixth”—the disease—will be presented together with some information about Conservation Biology—the surgeon. Then epistemic and epistemological difficulties in extinction assessment and (...)
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  40.  1
    Linking Biodiversity with Health and Well-Being: Consequences of Scientific Pluralism for Ethics, Values and Responsibilities.Serge Morand & Claire Lajaunie - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (2):153-168.
    This paper investigates the ethical implications of research at the interface between biodiversity and both human and animal health. Health and sanitary crises often lead to ethical debates, especially when it comes to disruptive interventions such as forced vaccinations, quarantine, or mass culling of domestic or wild animals. In such debates, the emergence of a “Planetary health ethics” can be highlighted. Ethics and accountability principles apply to all aspects of scientific research including its technological and engineering applications, regardless of (...)
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  41. A Philosophy for Biodiversity?Jay Odenbaugh - manuscript
    Sahotra Sarkar’s Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy is a welcome addition to the fields of environmental philosophy and the philosophy of science. First, his book has a rigorous and careful discussion of why we should preserve biodiversity. This is all the more important since much of environmental ethics has rested on normative claims which are unclear in meaning, appear unjustified at best and unjustifiable at worst, and are politically ineffective. Second, Sarkar is at home in the science of conservation (...)
     
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  42.  29
    Managing Biodiversity Through Stakeholder Involvement: Why, Who, and for What Initiatives?Olivier Boiral & Iñaki Heras-Saizarbitoria - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (3):403-421.
    The increasing pressures to conserve biodiversity—particularly for industries based on the exploitation of natural resources—have reinforced the need to implement specific measures in this area. Corporate commitment to preserving biodiversity is increasingly scrutinized by stakeholders and now represents an important aspect of business ethics. Although stakeholder involvement is often essential to the management of biodiversity, very few studies in the literature have focused on the details of this involvement. The objective of this paper is to analyze how (...)
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  43. Defining “Biodiversity”; Assessing Biodiversity.Sahotra Sarkar - 2001 - The Monist 85 (1):131-155.
    This paper analyzes the concept of biodiversity in conservation biology and assesses potential methods for its measurement.
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  44. The Biodiversity Bank Cannot Be a Lending Bank.Michael A. Mccarthy, Mark Colyvan & Brendan A. Wintle - unknown
    “Offsetting” habitat destruction has widespread appeal as an instrument for balancing economic growth with biodiversity conservation. Requiring proponents to pay the nontrivial costs of habitat loss encourages sensitive planning approaches. Offsetting, biobanking, and biodiverse carbon sequestration schemes will play an important role in conserving biodiversity under increasing human pressures. However, untenable assumptions in existing schemes are undermining their benefits. Policies that allow habitat destruction to be offset by the protection of existing habitat are guaranteed to result in further (...)
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  45.  18
    Why Animal Welfare is Not Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services, or Human Welfare: Toward a More Complete Assessment of Climate Impacts.Katie Mcshane - 2018 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 13 (1):43-64.
    KATIE McSHANE | : Taking the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as representative, I argue that animal ethics has been neglected in the assessment of climate policy. While effects on ecosystem services, biodiversity, and human welfare are all catalogued quite carefully, there is no consideration at all of the effects of climate change on the welfare of animals. This omission, I argue, should bother us, for animal welfare is not adequately captured by assessments of (...)
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  46.  9
    Accounting for the Unaccountable: Biodiversity Reporting and Impression Management.Olivier Boiral - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):751-768.
    This paper explores the strategies organizations use to demonstrate their accountability for biodiversity and legitimize their impact in this area through the use of techniques of neutralization. Neutralization aims to manage stakeholder impressions on very socially sensitive issues. Based on the content analysis of 148 sustainability reports from mining organizations, the study sheds light on the successful use of rhetoric in reports on non-measurable and potentially unaccountable issues. Specifically, the study shows that mining organizations use four main techniques of (...)
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  47. Is Biodiversity Intrinsically Valuable? (And What Might That Mean?).Katie McShane - 2017 - In Justin Garson, Anya Plutynski & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity. Routledge. pp. 155-167.
  48.  88
    Importing Corn, Exporting Labor: The Neoliberal Corn Regime, GMOs, and the Erosion of Mexican Biodiversity[REVIEW]Elizabeth Fitting - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (1):15-26.
    When genetically modified (GM) imported corn was found growing in Oaxaca and the Tehuacán Valley of Puebla, Mexico (2000–2002), it intensified the debate between activists, academics, and government officials about the effects of trade liberalization on Mexican corn farmers and maize biodiversity. In order to understand the challenges faced by corn farmers and in situ diversity, it is important to contextualize GM corn within the recent neoliberal corn regime and its regional manifestations. This essay offers a case study of (...)
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  49.  5
    Precis of defending biodiversity.Stefan Linquist, Gary Varner & Jonathan E. Newman - 2020 - Biology and Philosophy 35 (1):1-4.
    Why should governments or individuals invest time and resources in conserving biodiversity? A popular answer is that biodiversity has both instrumental value for humans and intrinsic value in its own right. Defending Biodiversity critically evaluates familiar arguments for these claims and finds that, at best, they provide good reasons for conserving particular species or regions. However, they fail to provide a strong justification for conserving biodiversity per se. Hence, either environmentalists must develop more compelling arguments for (...)
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  50. The Principle of Complementarity in the Design of Reserve Networks to Conserve Biodiversity: A Preliminary History.Sahotra Sarkar & James Justus - unknown
    Explicit, quantitative procedures for identifying biodiversity priority areas are replacing the often ad hoc procedures used in the past to design networks of reserves to conserve biodiversity. This change facilitates more informed choices by policy makers, and thereby makes possible greater satisfaction of conservation goals with increased efficiency. A key feature of these procedures is the use of the principle of complementarity, which ensures that areas chosen for inclusion in a reserve network complement those already selected. This paper (...)
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