Results for 'black lives matter'

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  1. Black Lives Matter and the Paradoxes of U.S. Black Politics: From Democratic Sacrifice to Democratic Repair.Juliet Hooker - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (4):448-469.
    This essay seeks to understand the complex response to the current Black Lives Matter protests against police violence, which pose deeper questions about the forms of politics that black citizens—who are experiencing a defining moment of racial terror in the United States in the twenty-first century—can and should pursue. When other citizens and state institutions betray a lack of care and concern for black suffering, which in turn makes it impossible for those wrongs to be (...)
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  2. Black Lives Matter and the Call for Death Penalty Abolition.Michael Cholbi & Alex Madva - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):517-544.
    The Black Lives Matter movement has called for the abolition of capital punishment in response to what it calls “the war against Black people” and “Black communities.” This article defends the two central contentions in the movement’s abolitionist stance: first, that US capital punishment practices represent a wrong to black communities rather than simply a wrong to particular black capital defendants or particular black victims of murder, and second, that the most defensible (...)
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  3. Black Lives Matter or All Lives Matter? Color-Blindness and Epistemic Injustice.Ashley Atkins - 2018 - Social Epistemology 33 (1):1-22.
    ABSTRACTThose who take ‘All lives matter’ to oppose ‘Black lives matter’ take the latter to mean something like ‘Only black lives matter.’ Those who regard this exclusionary construal as mistaken hold the error to be due to an ideology of color-blindness. It has further been argued that the ideologically-motivated suppression of racial discourse has resulted in an epistemic injustice, blinding objectors to the fact that ‘Black lives matter’ really means (...)
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  4.  72
    Listening to Black Lives Matter: Racial Capitalism and the Critique of Neoliberalism.Siddhant Issar - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):48-71.
    This article explores left critiques of neoliberalism in light of the Black Lives Matter movement’s recourse to the notion of ‘racial capitalism’ in their analyses of anti-Black oppression. Taking a cue from BLM, I argue for a critical theory of racial capitalism that historicizes neoliberalism within a longue durée framework, surfacing racialized continuities in capitalism’s violence. I begin by revealing how neo-Marxist and neo-Foucaultian approaches to neoliberalism, particularly that of David Harvey and Wendy Brown, respectively, partition (...)
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  5.  34
    Black Lives Matter and the Concept of the Counterworld. Mackin - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (4):459-481.
    Rancière’s reception among political theorists connects to what some have called an “aesthetic turn” in the study of politics. One feature of this turn is a critique of the emphasis on reason found in Rawls- and Habermas-inspired political thought. At least on the standard readings of them, Rawls and Habermas conceive of politics as a process of adjudicating competing interests and validity claims. Political theory then becomes an effort to determine the principles that should guide this adjudication and how they (...)
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  6.  4
    Black Lives Matter and the Politics of Redemption.Charles Olney - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    This article explores the role of practical political theory in the Black Lives Matter movement. I argue that BLM represents a multifaceted engagement with the complicated politics of redempt...
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  7. Black Lives Matter and the Politics of Redemption.Charles Olney - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    This article explores the role of practical political theory in the Black Lives Matter movement. I argue that BLM represents a multifaceted engagement with the complicated politics of redempt...
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  8.  5
    Do Black Lives Matter in Post-Brexit Britain?Anthony G. Reddie - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (3):387-401.
    This article speaks to existential challenges facing Black people, predominantly of Caribbean descent, to live in what continues to be a White dominated and White entitled society. Working against the backdrop of the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement that originated in the United States, this article analyses the socio-political and cultural frameworks that affirm Whiteness whilst concomitantly, denigrating Blackness. The author, a well-known Black liberation theologian, who is a child of the Windrush Generation, argues that Western (...)
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  9. The Affiliative Use of Emoji and Hashtags in the Black Lives Matter Movement.Mark Alfano, Ritsaart Reimann, Ignacio Quintana, Marc Cheong & Colin Klein - manuscript
    Protests and counter-protests seek to draw and direct attention and concern with confronting images and slogans. In recent years, as protests and counter-protests have partially migrated to the digital space, such images and slogans have also gone online. Two main ways in which these images and slogans are translated to the online space is through the use of emoji and hashtags. Despite sustained academic interest in online protests, hashtag activism and the use of emoji across social media platforms, little is (...)
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  10.  59
    Soul-Blindness, Police Orders and Black Lives Matter.Jonathan Havercroft & David Owen - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (6):739-763.
    What does it mean to see someone as human, as a member of humankind? What kind of call for justice is it to demand that a group be seen as human beings? This article explores a fundamental kind of injustice: one of perception and how we respond to our perceptions. Drawing on Cavell, Wittgenstein and Rancière, we elucidate “soul blindness” as a distinct and basic form of injustice. Rancière’s police orders and Cavell’s soul blindness are mutually constitutive; the undoing of (...)
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  11.  32
    Idle No More and Black Lives Matter: An Exchange.Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Rinaldo Walcott & Glen Coulthard - 2018 - Studies in Social Justice 12 (1):75-89.
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  12.  66
    Whose Lives Matter? The Black Lives Matter Movement and the Contested Legacy of Philosophical Humanism.Andrew J. Pierce - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):261-282.
  13.  3
    Philosophical Meditations on “Black Lives Matter".Mariam Thalos - 2016 - The Critique.
    What does “Black lives matter” say that “All lives matter” does not? In particular, why do we appreciate a kind of conflict between them? This essay is about the way that social identities work in human life. Appreciating the way that identity works will shed light on the way that “All lives matter” undermines the force of “Black lives matter.”.
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  14.  6
    Cowboy Cops and Black Lives Matter: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri and the Great White West[Ern].Debbie Olson - 2020 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 10:93-117.
    The racial framework of Martin McDonagh’s 2017 film Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri rests at the intersection of three persistent cultural myths—the Frontier Myth, the hero cowboy myth and the myth of white supremacy. There has been much criticism of the portrayal of black characters in the film, and particularly the lack of significant black characters in a film that sports a solid undercurrent of racial politics. While the black characters in the film occupy a small amount (...)
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  15. Can Capital Punishment Survive If Black Lives Matter?Michael Cholbi & Alex Madva - 2021 - In Michael Cholbi, Brandon Hogan, Alex Madva & Benjamin Yost (eds.), The Movement for Black Lives: Philosophical Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Drawing upon empirical studies of racial discrimination dating back to the 1940’s, the Movement for Black Lives platform calls for the abolition of capital punishment. Our purpose here is to defend the Movement’s call for death penalty abolition in terms congruent with its claim that the death penalty in the U.S. is a “racist practice” that “devalues Black lives.” We first sketch the jurisprudential history of race and capital punishment in the U.S., wherein courts have occasionally (...)
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  16.  29
    The Philosophy of Black Lives Matter.Sven Ove Hansson - 2020 - Theoria 86 (5):537-542.
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  17.  47
    Discussing Racial Justice in Light of 2016: Black Lives Matter, a Trump Presidency, and the Continued Struggle for Justice.María Teresa Dávila - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (4):761-792.
    The broad fields of ethical reflection on racialization, racial justice, black liberation theology, and queer theology of color must come to terms with the year 2016, which can be framed on one side with the Black Lives Matter movement, and on the other side with a presidential election cycle in which racism and racial justice played particularly salient roles. Against this backdrop, this book discussion looks at recent literature on racial justice asking three questions. How does (...)
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  18.  9
    Fast Violence, Revolutionary Violence: Black Lives Matter and the 2020 Pandemic.Claire Colebrook - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):495-499.
    The 2020 pandemic cannot be divorced from the problem, pace, and spectacle of race, both because of the racial rhetoric regarding the origins of the virus and because of the subsequent racial injustice in the distribution of healthcare. This paper adds the concept of fast violence to Rob Nixon’s “slow violence” to look at the intersection between the climate of the planet and the climate of racial injustice.
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  19.  34
    Black Lives in a Pandemic: Implications of Systemic Injustice for End‐of‐Life Care.Alan Elbaum - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):58-60.
    In recent months, Covid‐19 has devastated African American communities across the nation, and a Minneapolis police officer murdered George Floyd. The agents of death may be novel, but the phenomena of long‐standing epidemics of premature black death and of police violence are not. This essay argues that racial health and health care disparities, rooted as they are in systemic injustice, ought to carry far more weight in clinical ethics than they generally do. In particular, this essay examines palliative and (...)
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  20.  2
    Meeting the Moment: Bioethics in the Time of Black Lives Matter.Camisha Russell - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-13.
    In this article, I begin by describing what I call this Black Lives Matter moment in the US. I then offer three reasons for considering racism as a bioethical issue, the least discussed of which is...
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  21.  17
    Black Lives, Sex, and Revealed Religion Matter!Charles Taliaferro - 2017 - Philosophia Christi 19 (1):103-119.
    Kant’s negative, distorted views on black Africans, human sexuality, and revealed religion led him to undervalue the case for racial equality, healthy sexual intimacy, and the virtues of Christianity as a revealed religion with its commending worship, prayer, and rites. Kantian anthropology and critique of revealed religion is contrasted with the more capacious approach of the Cambridge Platonists. Challenging Kant’s methodological bias is important in removing the obstacles facing a fair assessment of matters of race, sexuality, and the virtues (...)
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  22.  4
    Ethics of Research at the Intersection of COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter: A Call to Action.Natasha Crooks, Geri Donenberg & Alicia Matthews - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):205-207.
    This paper describes how to ethically conduct research with Black populations at the intersection of COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter movement. We highlight the issues of historical mistrust in the USA and how this may impact Black populations’ participation in COVID-19 vaccination trials. We provide recommendations for researchers to ethically engage Black populations in research considering the current context. Our recommendations include understanding the impact of ongoing trauma, acknowledging historical context, ensuring diverse research (...)
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  23. The Arendtian Public Space of Black Lives Matter.Julie Kuhlken - 2021 - Southwest Philosophy Review 37 (2):71-74.
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  24.  10
    Theology, Culture, and Crisis: Tillich’s Method of Correlation and the Black Lives Matter Movemen.Jonathan Rothchild - 2017 - International Yearbook for Tillich Research 12 (1):87-108.
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  25. White Privilege, Injustice, and the "Black Lives Matter" Movement.Lawrence Blum - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (3):681-688.
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  26.  1
    Beyond Black Churches:Toward an Understanding of the Black Spiritual Left, Featuring Du Bois, Bethune, Thurman, and Black Lives Matter in Advance.Larry Perry - forthcoming - The Acorn.
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  27.  19
    From General History to Philosophy: Black Lives Matter, Late Neoliberal Molecular Biopolitics, and Rhetoric. Biesecker - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):409-430.
    On the fiftieth anniversary of Philosophy and Rhetoric I hope a future for the journal that not only continues to publish scholarship that reflects seriously on the productive possibilities of putting the unique understandings of the human condition delivered by philosophy into contact with the singular insights into the power and perils of speech, writing, and gesture offered up by rhetoric. I also wish for it printed pages on which scholars engage thoughtfully the challenges posed by worlds and loss of (...)
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  28.  4
    Black Women’s Lives Matter: Social Movements and Storytelling Against Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in the US.Domale Dube Keys - 2021 - Feminist Review 128 (1):163-168.
  29. The “All Lives Matter” Response: QUD-Shifting as Epistemic Injustice.Jessica Keiser - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):8465-8483.
    Drawing on recent work in formal pragmatic theory, this paper shows that the manipulation of discourse structure—in particular, by way of shifting the Question Under Discussion mid-discourse—can constitute an act of epistemic injustice. I argue that the “All Lives Matter” response to the “Black Lives Matter” slogan is one such case; this response shifts the Question Under Discussion governing the overarching discourse from Do Black lives matter? to Which lives matter? (...)
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  30.  74
    What Does It Mean to Move for Black Lives?Kimberly Ann Harris - 2019 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):275-291.
    I argue that the key ideas of the movement for Black lives have resonances with Frantz Fanon’s ideas particularly in Black Skin, White Masks. I first demonstrate how the mission to repudiate Black demise and affirm Black humanity captures Fanon’s critique of universal humanism. The fear of the Black body was central to the testimonies of Darren Wilson, Jeronimo Yanez, and George Zimmerman. Fanon prioritized the role of the body in his account of racism. (...)
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  31.  11
    The Movement for Black Lives: Philosophical Perspectives.Michael Cholbi, Brandon Hogan, Alex Madva & Benjamin Yost (eds.) - 2021 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    The Movement for Black Lives has gained worldwide visibility as a grassroots social justice movement distinguished by a decentralized, non-hierarchal mode of organization. MBL rose to prominence in part thanks to its protests against police brutality and misconduct directed at black Americans. However, its animating concerns are far broader, calling for a wide range of economic, political, legal, and cultural measures to address what it terms a “war against Black people,” as well as the “shared struggle (...)
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  32.  34
    Black Lives and Sacred Humanity: Toward an African American Religious Naturalism by Carol Wayne White.Slater Gary - 2017 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 38 (1):96-99.
    It speaks to the illogic of our public life that the slogan “All Lives Matter” has come to stand directly against “Black Lives Matter” within contemporary discourse on race. Carol Wayne White’s Black Lives and Sacred Humanity, among its other achievements, confirms the absurdity of such an opposition. White shows how historic efforts to defend and define the humanity of African Americans offer a vision in which all human lives do not simply (...)
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  33.  16
    Black Lives, Sacred Humanity, and the Racialization of Nature, or Why America Needs Religious Naturalism Today.Carol Wayne White - 2017 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 38 (2-3):109.
    "Life must be something more than dilettante speculation. And religion a great deal more than mere gratification of the instinct for worship linked with the straight-teaching of irreproachable credos. Religion must be life made true, and life is action, growth, development—begun now and ending never."In September 2016, a first-year student at East Tennessee State University interrupted a Black Lives Matter protest on campus, parading in a gorilla mask. Clad in overalls and barefoot, the young man offered bananas (...)
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  34.  14
    Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race in America.George Yancy & Linda Martin Alcoff - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Drawing from the lives of Ossie Davis, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, and W. E. B. Du Bois, as well as his own experience, and fully updated to account for what has transpired since the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, Yancy provides an invaluable resource for students and teachers of courses in African American Studies, African American History, Philosophy of Race, and anyone else who wishes to examine what it means to be Black in (...)
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  35. He Never Mattered: Poor Black Males and the Dark Logic of Intersectional Invisibility.Tommy J. Curry - 2021 - In The Movement for Black Lives: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 59-89.
  36. State Racism, State Violence, and Vulnerable Solidarity.Myisha Cherry - 2017 - In Naomi Zack (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Race. New York, NY, USA:
    What makes #BlackLivesMatter unique is the implication that it isn’t only some black lives that matter, that is, not only the most commonly referenced male lives. Rather, the hashtag suggests that all black lives matter, including queer, trans, disabled, and female. This movement includes all those black lives who have been marginalized within the black liberation tradition, as well as in greater society. The movement highlights the ways in which (...) people have been traditionally deprived of dignity and human rights. State racism and state violence are sustained together. The law creates a “subrace” out of those whom white society fears and holds in contempt. This leaves not only black Americans but all citizens vulnerable. A way to fight this form of racism is not only to create a solidarity among the oppressed members of the subrace but to create a solidarity with all members, in “vulnerable solidarity.”. (shrink)
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  37.  14
    Black Panther’s Rage: Sovereignty, the Exception and Radical Dissent.Neal Curtis - 2019 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 32 (2):265-281.
    Black Panther, directed by Ryan Coogler, became one of the highest grossing films of all time. It also received a lot of critical attention for its direct engagement with black experience and black politics. It speaks to the legacy of slavery and the exploitation of African-Americans and the ongoing post-colonial struggle represented most starkly by the Black Lives Matter Movement. However, the film was also criticised for supposedly leaving that radical black politics behind, (...)
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  38.  8
    Trans*Versal Animacies and the Mattering of Black Trans* Political Life.Abraham Weil - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):191-202.
    This article explores trans*versal connections between transness, blackness, and the animal. Drawn from the conceptual vocabulary of cultural theorist Félix Guattari, this article argues that the central purpose of transversality is to create linkages between previously unexplored singularities in a field, and then to create connections in other conceptual topographies at different levels of discursivity. The article advances an extension of Guattari’s “transversal” into a more capacious concept of the “trans*versal,” to analyze the #blacklivesmatter and #blacktranslivematter movements that draw on (...)
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  39.  6
    Black Placemaking: Celebration, Play, and Poetry.Marcus Anthony Hunter, Mary Pattillo, Zandria F. Robinson & Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (7-8):31-56.
    Using Chicago as our case, this article puts forth a notion of black placemaking that privileges the creative, celebratory, playful, pleasurable, and poetic experiences of being black and being around other black people in the city. Black placemaking refers to the ways that urban black Americans create sites of endurance, belonging, and resistance through social interaction. Our framework offers a corrective to existing accounts that depict urban blacks as bounded, plagued by violence, victims and perpetrators, (...)
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  40. Is Racial Profiling a Legitimate Strategy in the Fight Against Violent Crime?Neven Sesardić - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (4):981-999.
    Racial profiling has come under intense public scrutiny especially since the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. This article discusses two questions: whether racial profiling is sometimes rational, and whether it can be morally permissible. It is argued that under certain circumstances the affirmative answer to both questions is justified.
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  41.  1
    #Brokenpromises, Black Deaths, & Blue Ribbons: Understanding, Complicating, and Transcending Police-Community Violence.Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Kerri J. Tobin & Stephen M. Lentz (eds.) - 2018 - Brill | Sense.
    This volume powerfully examines divides and mistrust between urban communities and police. The essays challenge readers to contemplate how eroding trust developed, the concerns and challenges facing divided communities, and possible pathways forward considering whose lives matter.
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  42. Matter and Meaning: Is Matter Sacred or Profane?Michael Fuller (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    We live in a material world. But what is matter? Can it point us towards meanings outside itself, or can any meaning it possesses only be invested in it by human beings? To what extent might these semantic activities overlap? How have our current understandings of matter and meaning developed from those of past thinkers, in both Western and non-Western contexts? These and many other questions were addressed at a conference held under the auspices of the Science and (...)
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  43. Rap, Black Rage, and Racial Difference.Steven Best & Douglas Kellner - unknown
    Ice Cube "What's a brother gotta do to get a message through to the Red, White, and Blue?" Ice-T Rap music has emerged as one of the most distinctive and controversial music genres of the past decade. A significant part of hip hop culture, [1] rap articulates the experiences and conditions of African-Americans living in a spectrum of marginalized situations ranging from racial stereotyping and stigmatizing to struggle for survival in violent ghetto conditions. In this cultural context, rap provides a (...)
     
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  44. Positive Propaganda and The Pragmatics of Protest.Michael Randall Barnes - 2021 - In Brandon Hogan, Michael Cholbi, Alex Madva & Benjamin S. Yost (eds.), The Movement for Black Lives: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 139-159.
    This chapter examines what protest is from the point of view of pragmatics, and how it relates to propaganda—specifically what Jason Stanley calls ‘positive propaganda.’ It analyzes the phrase “Black Lives Matter,” taking it to be a political speech act that offers a unique route to understanding of the pragmatics of protest. From this, it considers the moral-epistemological function of protest, and develops an account of the authority that protest, as a speech act, both calls upon and (...)
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  45. Value-Based Protest Slogans: An Argument for Reorientation.Myisha Cherry - forthcoming - In The Movement for Black Lives: Philosophical Perspectives. New York: pp. 13.
    When bringing philosophical attention to bear on social movement slogans in general, philosophers have often focused on their communicative nature—particularly the hermeneutical failures that arise in discourse. Some of the most popular of these failures are illustrated in ‘all lives matter’ retorts to ‘black lives matter’ pronouncements. Although highlighting and criticizing these failures provides much needed insight into social movement slogans as a communicative practice, I claim that in doing so, philosophers and slogans’ users risk (...)
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  46.  92
    W.E.B. Du Bois: The Lost and the Found.Elvira Basevich - 2020 - Cambridge: Polity.
    In this tour-de-force, Elvira Basevich examines this paradox by tracing the development of W.E.B. Du Bois's life and thought and the relevance of his legacy to our troubled age. She adroitly analyzes the main concepts that inform Du Bois’s critique of American democracy, such as the color line and double consciousness, before examining how these concepts might inform our understanding of contemporary struggles, from Black Lives Matter to the campaign for reparations for slavery. She stresses the continuity (...)
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  47.  17
    Mapping Everyday: Gender, Blackness, and Discourse in Urban Contexts.L. Hill Taylor & Robert J. Helfenbein - 2009 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 45 (3):319-329.
    This article argues that by using theories of the spatial to understand how situated materiality (i.e., place) and contestations of identity matter when conceiving global and curricular space, educators may interrupt and rearticulate practices and systems of oppression. By focusing on globalization writ large, there is danger of leaving important concerns of the local unattended, and thereby failing to see how processes of globalization exacerbate problematic and oft-hidden curricular issues. Such diversions typify the most insidious quality of the current (...)
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  48. Is Red the New Black? A Quasi-Experimental Study Comparing Perceptions of Differently Coloured Cycle Lanes.Katrine Karlsen & Aslak Fyhri - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Cities and road authorities in many countries have started colouring their cycle lanes. Some road authorities choose red, some blue, and some green. The reasoning behind this choice is not clear, and it is uncertain whether some colours are superior to others. The current study aims to examine whether coloured cycle lanes are viewed more positively than uncoloured lanes, and whether one of the typically chosen colours is perceived as safer and more inviting to cyclists or more deterring to motorists. (...)
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  49.  4
    Information in the Universal Triangle of Reality for Non-Living/Living Structures: From Philosophy to Neuro/Life Sciences.Florin Gaiseanu - 2021 - Philosophy Study 11 (8):607-621.
    With the purpose to understand better the role of information not only in communication systems, but actually in our environmental reality, this paper presented the model of Universal Triangle of Reality, composed by Matter, Energy and Information, as fundamental constitutive components of this reality. Arguments coming from the field of physics, both at the cosmic and microparticles scale are presented, showing undoubtable conclusions that information is a fundamental component of reality in our material world. At the cosmic level, where (...)
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  50.  59
    Black Bodies Matter: A Reading of Ta-Nahisis Coates's Between the World and Me.Jill Gordon - 2017 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 38 (1):199-221.
    Some scholars read the black body as constructed by white consciousness or perceptions; Coates indicates, to the contrary, that violence against the black body and threats to black embodiment ground and make possible particular ideations of race and (white) American self-concepts. Coates takes an implicitly anti-Hegelian, anti-DuBoisian stance against any spirit or history that might redeem or affirm the black body as the grounding of black experience. Like repeated speech-acts, bodily violence is “world creating.” Although (...)
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