Results for 'business reputation'

999 found
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  1.  34
    Business and Social Reputation: Exploring the Concept and Main Dimensions of Corporate Reputation[REVIEW]Gregorio Martín de Castro, José Emilio Navas López & Pedro López Sáez - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):361-370.
    Different theoretical approaches highlight the growing relevance of corporate reputation as strategic factor. Among these approaches the arguments of the Resource-Based View are special worthwhile (Grant, 1991, California Management Review 33(3), 114–135; Barney, 1999, Sloan Management Review Spring, 137–145). Nevertheless, this topic poses several methodological problems (Barney et al., 2001), as the unavailability to identify and measure this organizational factor, that is “socially complex” and intangible in its nature. In this work, using the findings of our empirical research on (...)
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  2.  54
    Business Reputation and Labor Efficiency, Productivity, and Cost.Marty Stuebs & Li Sun - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):265 - 283.
    Assumed benefits from improved reputation are often used as motives to drive corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Are improved cost efficiencies among these reputation benefits? Cost efficiencies and cost management have become more relevant as revenue streams dry up in these tough economic times. Can a good reputation aid these efforts to develop cost efficiencies specifically when managing labor costs? Prior research hypothesizes that good reputation can create labor productivity and efficiency benefits. The purpose of this (...)
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  3.  5
    The Effect of Age and Size on Reputation of Business Ethics Journals.Victor Glass & E. Susanna Cahn - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (7):1465-1480.
    Business ethics journals have appeared on a few ranked lists that are specific to this niche discipline. As with more traditional academic disciplines, these rankings are used for academic rewards such as faculty tenure and promotion, along with department and school ratings. Journal ranking has been subject to considerable criticism even as its administrative use persists. Among the criticisms are that journal quality is a poor proxy for article quality, citation rate is an imperfect reflection of article influence, and (...)
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  4.  14
    Of Babies and Bathwater An Extension of the Business & Society Research Forum on the Fortune Reputation Database.Eugene Szwajkowski & Raymond E. Figlewicz - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (4):362-386.
    A research forum published in Business & Society in 1995 analyzed whether Fortune magazine's annual Reputation Survey is viable as a corporate social performance research database. We examine plausible alternative interpretations for a number of assertions and conclusions by the forum authors, including the premise for Brown and Perry's proposed transformation: that the Fortune data are confounded by the presence of a financial "halo," which biases ratings of nonfinancial attributes. Finally, we examine the appropriate roles of the two (...)
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  5.  18
    Business and Social Reputation: Exploring the Concept and Main Dimensions of Corporate Reputation.Gregorio Martín De Castro, José Emilio Navas López & Pedro López Sáez - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):361-370.
    Different theoretical approaches highlight the growing relevance of corporate reputation as strategic factor. Among these approaches the arguments of the Resource-Based View are special worthwhile (Grant, 1991, California Management Review 33(3), 114-135; Barney, 1999, Sloan Management Review Spring, 137-145). Nevertheless, this topic poses several methodological problems (Barney et al., 2001), as the unavailability to identify and measure this organizational factor, that is "socially complex" and intangible in its nature. In this work, using the findings of our empirical research on (...)
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  6.  12
    Reputation as an Emerging Construct in the Business and Society Field an Introduction.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (4):365-370.
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  7. Sustainability: Business Strategy Trumps Reputation.G. O'Brien - forthcoming - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility.
     
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  8.  6
    Business Ethics and the Return on Reputation.Maria Ivancin - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):150 - 152.
    Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Volume 27, Issue 2, Page 150-152, April-June.
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  9.  67
    Corporate Identity, Ethics and Reputation in Supplier–Buyer Relationships.Michael Bendixen & Russell Abratt - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):69-82.
    Multi-national corporations (MNCs) have been criticised for not behaving ethically in some situations, which could have a negative effect on their reputation. This study examines the ethics of a large MNC in its relationship with its suppliers. A brief literature review of corporate identity, business ethics and buyer–supplier relationships is undertaken. The views and perceptions of the buying staff and the suppliers to a large South African MNC are obtained and discussed. The results indicate that this MNC has (...)
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  10.  22
    Reputation, Responsibility, and Stakeholder Support in Scandinavian Firms: A Comparative Analysis.Deborah Vidaver-Cohen & Peggy Simcic Brønn - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):49-64.
    This paper describes an exploratory study of corporate responsibility, corporate reputation, and stakeholder support in Norway, Sweden and Denmark—countries recognized worldwide as providing an institutional climate uniquely conducive to responsible business practice. Conducting a secondary analysis of Scandinavian data from Reputation Institute’s extensive global research on corporate reputation and responsibility, we examine four key questions: First, do Scandinavians agree with external observers that firms in their countries demonstrate superior levels of corporate responsibility? Second, relative to other (...)
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  11.  59
    Corporate Reputation and Philanthropy: An Empirical Analysis.Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):29-44.
    This paper analyzes the determinants of corporate reputation within a sample of large UK companies drawn from a diverse range of industries. We pay particular attention to the role that philanthropic expenditures and policies may play in shaping the perceptions of companies among their stakeholders. Our findings highlight that companies which make higher levels of philanthropic expenditures have better reputations and that this effect varies significantly across industries. Given that reputational indices tend to reflect the financial performance of organizations (...)
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  12. The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Brand Performance: The Mediating Effect of Industrial Brand Equity and Corporate Reputation[REVIEW]Chi-Shiun Lai, Chih-Jen Chiu, Chin-Fang Yang & Da-Chang Pai - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):457 - 469.
    In this article, the researchers explore the following question. Can corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the corporate reputation of a firm lead to its brand equity in business-to-business (B2B) markets? This study discusses CSR from customers' viewpoints by taking the sample of industrial purchasers from Taiwan small-medium enterprises. The aims of this study are to investigate: first, the effects of CSR and corporate reputation on industrial brand equity; second, the effects of CSR, corporate reputation, and (...)
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  13.  58
    A Ten-Step Model for Academic Integrity: A Positive Approach for Business Schools.Cam Caldwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):1-13.
    The problem of academic dishonesty in Business Schools has risen to the level of a crisis according to some authors, with the incidence of reports on student cheating rising to more than half of all the business students. In this article we introduce the problem of academic integrity as a holistic issue that requires creating a␣cultural change involving students, faculty, and administrators in an integrated process. Integrating the extensive literature from other scholars, we offer a ten-step model which (...)
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  14.  48
    The Creation of Value Through Corporate Reputation.José Luis Fernández Sánchez & Ladislao Luna Sotorrío - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):335-346.
    The relationship between social and financial performance (CSP – FP) has been a main objective in the literature on business management, as it would provide an economic justification for the social investment insofar as it contributes to the creation of value. This relationship has been empirically tested by several authors though without using a theoretical model that sustains this relationship. The aim of this article is to propose a theoretical model of the process of the creation of value from (...)
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  15.  20
    Modeling Corporate Social Performance and Job Pursuit Intention: Mediating Mechanisms of Corporate Reputation and Job Advancement Prospects. [REVIEW]Rong-Tsu Wang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):569-582.
    An important issue for successful recruitment is to increase the pursuit intention of job seekers. This study discusses such issue by proposing a research model based on the signaling theory and the expectancy theory. In the model, this study hypothesizes that the perceived corporate social performance of job seekers positively affects their job pursuit intention and recommendation intention indirectly via the mediation of corporate reputation and job advancement prospects. The proposed hypotheses of this research are empirically tested using the (...)
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  16.  14
    Honorableness or Beneficialness? Cicero on Natural Law, Virtues, Glory, and (Corporate) Reputation.Michael S. Aßländer - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):751-767.
    During the last decade corporate reputation as one of the central efforts of corporate citizenship behavior has gained increasing attention in scholarly research, as has the way that reputation can serve as an instrument for business purposes. This poses the question of how such reputation will be achieved. To answer these questions this article examines Cicero’s considerations concerning the interrelation of honorableness and beneficialness made in his work ‘On Duties’. Based on Cicero’s understanding of universal natural (...)
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  17.  66
    What is This Thing Called "Reputation"?Christopher W. Morris - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):87-102.
    Concern for one's "reputation" has been introduced in recent game theory enabling theorists to demonstrate the rationality ofcooperative behavior in certain contexts. And these impressive results have been generalized to a variety of situations studied bystudents of business and business ethicists. But it is not clear that the notion of reputation employed has much explanatory power onceone sees what is meant. I also suggest that there may be some larger lessons about the notion of rationality used (...)
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  18.  20
    John Commons on Customer Goodwill and the Economic Value of Business Ethics: Response to Professor Sen.Robert Black - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):359-365.
    This paper shows how John R. Commons’ analysis of a firm’s goodwill value gives analytical support to Professor Amartya Sen’s contention (BEQ, 1993) that business ethics makes economic sense. A firm’s market value consists of the value of both tangible and intangible capital, including the goodwill value of ongoing customer relations. If a firm is to defend its goodwill value, it needs to have the protection of the courts and to pursue ethical practices. The courts defend fair competition by (...)
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  19.  21
    John Commons on Customer Goodwill and the Economic Value of Business Ethics: Response to Professor Sen.Robert Black - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):359-365.
    This paper shows how John R. Commons’ analysis of a firm’s goodwill value gives analytical support to Professor Amartya Sen’s contention that business ethics makes economic sense. A firm’s market value consists of the value of both tangible and intangible capital, including the goodwill value of ongoing customer relations. If a firm is to defend its goodwill value, it needs to have the protection of the courts and to pursue ethical practices. The courts defend fair competition by giving protection (...)
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  20.  5
    Stakeholder’s Preference and Rational Compliance: A Comment on Sacconi’s “CSR as a Model for Extended Corporate Governance II: Compliance, Reputation and Reciprocity”.Pedro Francés-Gómez & Ariel del Rio - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):59-76.
    Lorenzo Sacconi's recent re-statement of his social contract account of business ethics is a major contribution to our understanding of the normative nature of CSR as the expression of a fair multi-party agreement supported by the economic rationality of each participant. However, at one crucial point in his theory, Sacconi introduces the concept of stakeholders' conformist preferences - their disposition to punish the firm if it defects from the agreement, refusing to abide by its own explicit CSR policies and (...)
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  21.  26
    Strategic Reputation Risk Management.Judy Larkin - 2003 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Reputation is a commercially valuable asset. This book focuses upon how enhanced reputation can contribute to commercial asset management through increased share price premium and competitive performance, while reputation loss can significantly erode the ability of the business to successfully retain market share, maximize shareholder value, raise finance, manage debt, and remain independent. It provides practical models and checklists designed to plan reputation management and risk communication strategies.
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  22.  9
    Corporate Charitable Contributions: Business Award Winners' Giving Behaviors.Choong-Yuel Yoo & Jinhan Pae - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (1):25-44.
    We investigate corporate giving behaviors of prestigious business award winners in Korea. In particular, we examine whether firms strategically use corporate giving to enhance corporate reputation. We find that award winners generally make more charitable contributions than nonwinners prior to winning awards and maintain significant charitable contributions after winning awards; multiple award winners make even more charitable contributions than single-award winners; and an increase in charitable contributions does not raise the probability of winning awards in the year after (...)
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  23.  11
    Consumers’ Perceptions of Retail Business Ethics and Loyalty to the Retailer: The Moderating Role of Social Discount Practices.Mbaye Fall Diallo & Christine Lambey-Checchin - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):435-449.
    This research investigates the influence that consumers’ perceptions of retail business ethics have on their responses when retailers either create social discount spaces or do not. Using scenarios to imply these social practices and structural equation modeling to test the hypotheses among a sample of 689 respondents, the authors find that consumers’ perceptions of retail business ethics have positive effects on consumer loyalty, both directly and through consumer trust, as well as positive, strong influences on the retailer’s corporate (...)
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  24.  8
    Business Groups and Corporate Social Responsibility.Jongmoo Jay Choi, Hoje Jo, Jimi Kim & Moo Sung Kim - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (4):931-954.
    There is a growing literature on corporate social responsibility, but few have focused on the implications of business groups for CSR. We examine the antecedents and outcomes of CSR behaviors of group firms in Korea. We find that group affiliation is associated with higher CSR overall and for its major societal and environmental components. However, the ownership disparity between cash flow and control by controlling inside shareholders is associated with lower CSR, consistent with opportunistic rent expropriation theory. We further (...)
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  25.  21
    Is It Commercially Irresponsible to Trust?Keith Blois - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):183 - 193.
    This paper considers a recent U.K. legal dispute where a supplier sued a large organization, which had been a long-term customer, for breach of implied contract. It uses this case to discuss aspects of the nature of trust between organizations. The discussion encompasses a consideration of the distinction between trust and reliability; and, why the concept of blanket trust is not helpful. In conclusion, by contrasting business-to-business and personal relationships, the paper suggests that firms in their relationships with (...)
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  26.  5
    Corporate Reputation and Collective Crises: A Theoretical Development Using the Case of Rana Plaza.Breeda Comyns & Elizabeth Franklin-Johnson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):159-183.
    Banking scandals, accounting fraud, product recalls, and environmental disasters, their associated reputational effects as well as company response strategies have been well reported in the literature. Reported crises and scandals typically involve one focal company for example BP and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon accident. As business practices change and company supply chains become more complex and interlinked, there is a greater risk of collective crises where multiple companies are associated with the same scandal. We argue that companies are likely (...)
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  27.  3
    Corporate Philanthropy, Reputation Risk Management and Shareholder Value: A Study of Australian Corporate Giving.Kate Hogarth, Marion Hutchinson & Wendy Scaife - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):375-390.
    This study examines the role of corporate philanthropy in the management of reputation risk and shareholder value of the top 100 ASX listed Australian firms for the 3 years 2011–2013. The results of this study demonstrate the business case for corporate philanthropy and hence encourage corporate philanthropy by showing increasing firms’ investment in corporate giving as a percentage of profit before tax, increases the likelihood of an increase in shareholder value. However, the proviso is that firms must also (...)
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  28.  15
    Stakeholder's Preference and Rational Compliance: A Comment on Sacconi's “CSR as a Model for Extended Corporate Governance II: Compliance, Reputation and Reciprocity”.Pedro Francés-Gómez & Ariel Ridelo - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):59 - 76.
    Lorenzo Sacconi’s recent re-statement of his social contract account of business ethics is a major contribution to our understanding of the normative nature of CSR as the expression of a fair multi-party agreement supported by the economic rationality of each participant. However, at one crucial point in his theory, Sacconi introduces the concept of stakeholders’ conformist preferences – their disposition to punish the firm if it defects from the agreement, refusing to abide by its own explicit CSR policies and (...)
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  29. The Impact of Board Diversity and Gender Composition on Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Reputation.Stephen Bear, Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):207 - 221.
    This article explores how the diversity of board resources and the number of women on boards affect firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) ratings, and how, in turn, CSR influences corporate reputation. In addition, this article examines whether CSR ratings mediate the relationships among board resource diversity, gender composition, and corporate reputation. The OLS regression results using lagged data for independent and control variables were statistically significant for the gender composition hypotheses, but not for the resource diversitybased hypotheses. CSR (...)
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  30.  91
    How CSR Leads to Corporate Brand Equity: Mediating Mechanisms of Corporate Brand Credibility and Reputation[REVIEW]Won-Moo Hur, Hanna Kim & Jeong Woo - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-12.
    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among corporate social responsibility (CSR), corporate brand credibility, corporate brand equity, and corporate reputation. Structural equation modeling analysis provided support for the hypotheses from a sample of 867 consumers in South Korea. The results showed that CSR has a direct positive effect on corporate brand credibility and corporate reputation. In addition, the results indicate that corporate brand credibility mediates the relationship between CSR and corporate reputation. Moreover, corporate (...)
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  31. The Advertising Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Reputation and Brand Equity: Evidence From the Life Insurance Industry in Taiwan. [REVIEW]Ker-Tah Hsu - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):189-201.
    This study investigates the persuasive advertising and informative advertising effects of CSR initiatives on corporate reputation and brand equity based on the evidence from the life insurance industry in Taiwan. The study finds, first, policyholders’ perceptions concerning the CSR initiatives of life insurance companies have positive effects on customer satisfaction, corporate reputation, and brand equity. Second, the advertising effects of the CSR initiatives on corporate reputation are only informative. Third, the impacts of CSR initiatives on brand equity (...)
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  32.  75
    Corporate Philanthropy, Criminal Activity, and Firm Reputation: Is There a Link? [REVIEW]Robert J. Williams & J. Douglas Barrett - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):341 - 350.
    This study examined the influence of corporate giving programs on the link between certain categories of corporate crime and corporate reputation. Specifically, firms that violate EPA and OSHA regulations should, to some extent, experience a decline in their reputations, while firms that contribute to charitable causes should see their reputations enhanced. The results of this study support both of these contentions. Further, the results suggest that corporate giving significantly moderates the link between the number of EPA and OSHA violations (...)
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  33. Why Business Cannot Be a Practice.Ron Beadle - 2008 - Analyse & Kritik 30 (1):229-241.
    In a series of papers Geoff Moore has applied Alasdair MacIntyre’s much cited work to generate a virtue-based business ethics. Central to this pro ject is Moore’s argument that business falls under MacIntyre’s concept of ‘practice’. This move attempts to overcome MacIntyre’s reputation for being ‘anti-business’ while maintaining his framework for evaluating social action and replaces MacIntyre’s hostility to management with a conception of managers as institutional practitioners . I argue however that this move has not (...)
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  34.  14
    The Value Relevance of Reputation for Sustainability Leadership.Isabel Costa Lourenço, Jeffrey Lawrence Callen, Manuel Castelo Branco & José Dias Curto - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):17-28.
    This study investigates whether the market valuation of the two summary accounting measures, book value of equity and net income, is higher for firms with reputation for sustainability leadership, when compared to firms that do not enjoy such reputation. The results are interpreted through the lens of a framework combining signalling theory and resource-based theory, according to which firms signal their commitment to sustainability to influence the external perception of reputation. A firm’s reputation for being committed (...)
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  35.  39
    The Impact of Interactive Corporate Social Responsibility Communication on Corporate Reputation.David Eberle, Guido Berens & Ting Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):731-746.
    Companies increasingly communicate about corporate social responsibility (CSR) through interactive online media. We examine whether using such media is beneficial to a company’s reputation. We conducted an online experiment to examine the impacts of interactivity in CSR messages on corporate reputation and word-of-mouth intentions. Our findings suggest that an increase in perceived interactivity leads to higher message credibility and stronger feelings of identification with the company, which also boost corporate reputation and word-of-mouth. This result implies that using (...)
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  36.  27
    Ethical Leadership and Reputation: Combined Indirect Effects on Organizational Deviance.Pedro Neves & Joana Story - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):165-176.
    The interest in ethical leadership has grown in the past few years, with an emphasis on the mechanisms through which it affects organizational life. However, research on the boundary conditions that limit and/or enhance its effectiveness is still scarce, especially concerning one of the main misconceptions about ethical leadership, its incompatibility with effectiveness . Thus, the present study examines the relationship between ethical leadership and organizational deviance via affective commitment to the organization, as a reflection of the quality of the (...)
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  37.  16
    Is Publicity Always Better Than Advertising? The Role of Brand Reputation in Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility.Siv Skard & Helge Thorbjørnsen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-12.
    Previous studies on corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication suggest that firms’ social initiatives should be communicated through third-party, non-corporate sources because they are perceived as unbiased and therefore reduce consumer skepticism. In this article, we extend existing research by showing that source effects in the communication of social sponsorships are contingent on the brand’s pre-existing reputation. We argue that the congruence between the credibility and trustworthiness of the message source and the brand helps predict consumer responses to a social (...)
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  38.  63
    A Social Contract Account for CSR as an Extended Model of Corporate Governance (II): Compliance, Reputation and Reciprocity. [REVIEW]Lorenzo Sacconi - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):77 - 96.
    This essay seeks to give a contractarian foundation to the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), meant as an extended model of corporate governance of the firm. Whereas, justificatory issues have been discussed in a related paper (Sacconi, L.: 2006b, this journal), in this essay I focus on the implementation of and compliance with this normative model. The theory of reputation games, with reference to the basic game of trust, is introduced in order to make sense of self-regulation as (...)
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  39.  53
    Toward a Better Understanding of Organizational Efforts to Rebuild Reputation Following an Ethical Scandal.Ronald Sims - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):453-472.
    This article explores the issue of rebuilding an organization’s reputation following an ethical scandal. We divide our discussion into four parts. First, we discuss the concept of reputation. We note its relevance to today’s organizations, offer several contemporary definitions along with highlighting its benefits and downsides. In the second section, we offer the work of anthropologist, Victor Turner, on social drama along with other views on organizational efforts to rebuild their reputation to include reputation management routines. (...)
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  40.  69
    Doing Business After the Fall: The Virtue of Moral Hypocrisy.C. Daniel Batson, Elizabeth Collins & Adam A. Powell - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):321-335.
    Moral hypocrisy is motivation to appear moral yet, if possible, avoid the cost of actually being moral. In business, moral hypocrisy allows one to engender trust, solve the commitment problem, and still relentlessly pursue personal gain. Indicating the power of this motive, research has provided clear and consistent evidence that, given the opportunity, many people act to appear fair (e.g., they flip a coin to distribute resources between themselves and another person) without actually being fair (they accept the flip (...)
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  41.  60
    Value Priorities as Combining Core Factors Between CSR and Reputation – A Qualitative Study.Marjo Elisa Siltaoja - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):91-111.
    This article explores the nature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate reputation using qualitative research approach. Specifically, the relationship between CSR and corporate reputation is examined from the viewpoint of value theory. This paper brings up for discussion the various value priorities lying in the background of CSR actions. The aim is to form categories of value priorities around CSR and reputation, based on qualitative research approach. The main concepts in this paper – CSR, reputation (...)
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  42.  51
    Organizations Behaving Badly: When Are Discreditable Actions Likely to Damage Organizational Reputation?A. Rebecca Reuber & Eileen Fischer - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):39-50.
    Everyday there are revelations of organizations behaving in discreditable ways. Sometimes these actions result in damage to an organization's reputation, but often they do not. In this article, we examine the question of why external stakeholders may overlook disclosed discreditable actions, even those entailing ethical breaches. Drawing on stigmatization theory, we develop a model to explain the likelihood of reputational loss following revelations of discreditable actions. The model integrates four properties of actions (perceived control, perceived certainty, perceived threat, and (...)
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  43.  14
    An Examination of the Effect of CEO Social Ties and CEO Reputation on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments.Steven E. Kaplan, Janet A. Samuels & Jeffrey Cohen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):103-117.
    CEO compensation has received much attention from both academics and regulators. However, academics have given scant attention to understanding judgments about CEO compensation by third parties such as investors. Our study contributes to the ethics literature on CEO compensation by examining whether judgments about CEO compensation are influenced by two aspects of a company’s tone at the top—social ties between the CEO and members of the Executive Compensation Committee and the CEO’s Reputation, particularly for financial reporting and disclosures. Although, (...)
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  44.  38
    Business and Children: Mapping Impacts, Managing Responsibilities.Andrew Crane & Bahar Ali Kazmi - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):567-586.
    In recent years, issues of childhood obesity, unsafe toys, and child labor have raised the question of corporate responsibilities to children. However, business impacts on children are complex, multi-faceted, and frequently overlooked by senior managers. This article reports on a systematic analysis of the reputational landscape constructed by the media, corporations, and non-government organizations around business responsibilities to children. A content analysis methodology is applied to a sample of more than 350 relevant accounts during a 5-year period. We (...)
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  45.  14
    The Reputation Effects of Earnings Management in the Internal Labor Market.Steven E. Kaplan & Susan P. Ravenscroft - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (3):453-478.
    The current study is designed to propose and test a model about the ethical reputation of a target manager who must decide whether to engage in earnings management. We employ an experimental approach to examine the potential negative reputation effects within the internal labor market of a firm that occur as a consequence of earnings management. We examine participants’ responses to a hypothetical (target) manager when both the target’s behavior and the corporate incentives were manipulated. Participants assessed how (...)
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  46.  36
    Responsible Leadership in Organizational Crises: An Analysis of the Effects of Public Perceptions of Selected SA Business Organizations' Reputations. [REVIEW]D. A. L. Coldwell, T. Joosub & E. Papageorgiou - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):133-144.
    ‘The loss of a stable state’ (Schon 1973 ) in organizational transformation can both be regarded as lamentable and inevitable. Transformation causes disruption and invasions of comfort zones to those affected by it, but it is nevertheless inevitable. The article maintains that while the loss of a stable state is inevitable in the stream of change confronting organizations today, points of stability and methods of dealing with instability are attainable through responsible management. The article postulates that steps taken by responsible (...)
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  47.  4
    Spiritual-Based Leadership in Business.P. Pruzan - 2008 - Journal of Human Values 14 (2):101-114.
    A new global leadership paradigm is gradually emerging, spiritual-based leadership. The article context-ualizes this development within a framework of scientific and economic rationality. In contrast to these, a spiritual approach to leadership is presented as integrating a leader's inner perspective on the purpose of life and leadership such that this inner perspective is the foundation for decisions and actions in the outer world of business. Empirical research is presented, based on interviews with 31 top leaders from 15 countries in (...)
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  48.  15
    Reputation and Group Dispositions.Andrés Páez - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (3):469-484.
    In many contexts, such as business, science and law, it is essential to determine whether a company, a product or a person in fact has the reputation attributed to it, regardless of whether that reputation has been rightly earned. In this paper I offer two necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for the attribution of a reputation to a subject within a social group. The first one concerns the way in which reputational information is spread among the (...)
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    Gaming Google: Some Ethical Issues Involving Online Reputation Management.Jo Ann Oravec - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:61-81.
    Using the search engine Google to locate information linked to individuals and organizations has become part of everyday functioning. This article addresses whether the “gaming” of Internet applications in attempts to modify reputations raises substantial ethical concerns. It analyzes emerging approaches for manipulation of how personally-identifiable information is accessed online as well as critically-important international differences in information handling. It investigates privacy issues involving the data mining of personally-identifiable information with search engines and social media platforms. Notions of “gaming” and (...)
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  50.  15
    Ethical Leadership for Machiavellians in Business.Vanessa Lam - unknown
    Despite some progress in instilling ethics into business practice, businesses continue to make decisions that result in incredible harms to people and the environment around the world. Academics, the public, and the media have often singled out business leaders as unethical and responsible for the vast harms that their companies have done. As a result, some have looked to ethical business leadership as one avenue of approach to making businesses act more ethically. This thesis explores two leadership (...)
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