Results for 'cartesianism'

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  1.  4
    Vincent Carraud.To Cartesianism - 1995 - In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press. pp. 110.
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  2.  2
    Steven Nadler.of Arnauld'S. Cartesianism - 1995 - In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press.
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  3. Concept Cartesianism, Concept Pragmatism, and Frege Cases.Bradley Rives - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (2):211-238.
    This paper concerns the dialectal role of Frege Cases in the debate between Concept Cartesians and Concept Pragmatists. I take as a starting point Christopher Peacocke’s argument that, unlike Cartesianism, his ‘Fregean’ Pragmatism can account for facts about the rationality and epistemic status of certain judgments. I argue that since this argument presupposes that the rationality of thoughts turn on their content, it is thus question-begging against Cartesians, who claim that issues about rationality turn on the form, not the (...)
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  4.  64
    Holism in Cartesianism and in Today's Philosophy of Physics.Michael Esfeld - 1999 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):17-36.
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more balanced judgement than the widespread impression that the changes which are called for in today's philosophy of physics and which centre around the concept of holism amount to a rupture with the framework of Cartesian philosophy of physics. I argue that this framework includes a sort of holism: As a result of the identification of matter with space, any physical property can be instantiated only if there is the whole (...)
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  5.  19
    Beyond Cartesianism: Body-Perception and the Immediacy of Empathy.Joona Taipale - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2):161-178.
    The current debates dealing with empathy, social cognition, and the problem of other minds widely accept the assumption that, whereas we can directly perceive the other’s body, certain additional mental operations are needed in order to access the contents of the other’s mind. Body-perception has, in other words, been understood as something that merely mediates our experience of other minds and requires no philosophical analysis in itself. The available accounts have accordingly seen their main task as pinpointing the operations and (...)
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  6.  89
    Cartesianism and its Feminist Promise and Limits: The Case of Mary Astell.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Catherine Wilson & Stephen Gaukroger (eds.), Mind and Nature in Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Mary Astell's contributions to the history of feminism, noting her grounding in and departure from Cartesianism and its relation to women.
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  7.  73
    Cartesianism, the Embodied Mind, and the Future of Cognitive Research.Philippe Gagnon - 2015 - In Dirk Evers, Michael Fuller, Anne Runehov & Knut-Willy Sæther (eds.), Do Emotions Shape the World? Biennial Yearbook of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology 2015-2016. Martin-Luther-Universität. pp. 225-244.
    In his oft-cited book Descartes' Error, Antonio Damasio claims that Descartes is responsible for having stifled the development of modern neurobiological science, in particular as regards the objective study of the physical and physiological bases for emotive and socially-conditioned cognition. Most of Damasio’s book would stand without reference to Descartes, so it is intriguing to ask why he launched this attack. What seems to fuel such claims is a desire for a more holistic understanding of the mind, the brain and (...)
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  8.  15
    Review Essay of Alexander X. Douglas, Spinoza and Dutch Cartesianism (Oxford University Press, 2015), Mind (2017). [REVIEW]Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - Mind.
  9.  45
    Malebranche, Taste, and Sensibility: The Origins of Sensitive Taste and a Reconsideration of Cartesianism’s Feminist Potential.Katharine J. Hamerton - 2008 - Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (4):533-558.
    This essay argues that Malebranche originated the model of sensitive taste in French thought, several decades before Du Bos. It examines the highly gendered, negative physiological model of taste and of the female mind which Malebranche developed within the Cartesian framework and as a witness to Parisian salon society in which women’s taste had great cultural influence, and strongly questions the common assumption that Cartesian substance dualism necessarily contained feminist potential. The essay argues for Malebranche’s great influence in this regard, (...)
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  10.  14
    Intersubjective Phenomenology and Husserl's Cartesianism.Harrison Hall - 1979 - Man and World 12 (1):13-20.
    Once Husserl has constituted the other ego in the "Fifth Meditation," he is able to add to his phenomenology the overall dimension of intersubjectivi- ty. Objects are no longer constituted simply as systematic correlates of my actual (presented) and po.ssible (appresented) perspectival views of them, but as correlates of the actual and possibly actual views of an open community of transcendental subjects to which I belong--that is, as co,rrelates of my actual (presented) view and the actual and possibly actual (appresented) (...)
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  11.  27
    On Husserl’s Alleged Cartesianism and Conjunctivism: A Critical Reply to Claude Romano.Andrea Staiti - 2015 - Husserl Studies 31 (2):123-141.
    In this paper I criticize Claude Romano’s recent characterization of Husserl’s phenomenology as a form of Cartesianism. Contra Romano, Husserl is not committed to the view that since individual things in the world are dubitable, then the world as a whole is dubitable. On the contrary, for Husserl doubt is a merely transitional phenomenon which can only characterize a temporary span of experience. Similarly, illusion is not a mode of experience in its own right but a retrospective way of (...)
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  12.  15
    The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism.Giovanni Gellera - 2013 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):191-211.
    In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism. Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King's College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes. The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.
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  13.  13
    Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book-length study of two of Descartes's most innovative successors, Robert Desgabets and Pierre-Sylvain Regis, and of their highly original contributions to Cartesianism. The focus of the book is an analysis of radical doctrines in the work of these thinkers that derive from arguments in Descartes: on the creation of eternal truths, on the intentionality of ideas, and on the soul-body union. As well as relating their work to that of fellow Cartesians such as Malebranche and Arnauld, (...)
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  14. Husserl's Theory of the Phenomenological Reduction: Between Life-World and Cartesianism.Sebastian Luft - 2004 - Research in Phenomenology 34 (1):198-234.
    on points that remain especially crucial, i.e., the concept of the natural attitude, the ways into the reduction (and their systematics), and finally the question of the “meaning of the reduction.” Indeed, in the reading attempted here, this final question leads to two, not necessarily related, focal points: a Cartesian and a Life-world tendency. It is my claim that in following these two paths, Husserl was consistent in pursuing two evident leads in his philosophical enterprise; however, he was at the (...)
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  15.  4
    The Reception of Cartesianism.John Henry - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 116.
    This chapter, which examines the work of Rene Descartes and the reception of Cartesianism in Great Britain in the seventeenth century, suggests that Descartes was an undeniably influential figure during this period, and explains that he exposed the faults of the philosophy before him and pointed the way forward. It also highlights the fact that Cartesianism was accepted in the universities after Aristotelianism was significantly affected by innovations in the sciences and university curricula in natural philosophy had to (...)
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  16.  7
    Spinoza and Dutch Cartesianism: Philosophy and Theology, by Alexander X. Douglas.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2017 - Mind 126 (504):1244-1251.
    _ Spinoza and Dutch Cartesianism: Philosophy and Theology _, by DouglasAlexander X.. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. viii + 184.
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  17.  37
    Cartesianism and Port-Royal.Steven Nadler - 1988 - The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    Contrary to what appears to be popular belief, Port-Royal was not a bastion of cartesianism. In fact, Of all the port-Royalists of the seventeenth century, Only arnauld can be considered a cartesian in any interesting sense. Most of the others associated with the order were hostile to the new philosophy and actively campaigned against it, Believing it to pose a threat to piety and "true" religion. This can be seen by examining the writings of de sacy, Du vaucel, And (...)
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  18.  28
    Overturning Cartesianism and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion: Rethinking Dreyfus on Heidegger.Leslie MacAvoy - 2001 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):455 – 480.
    This essay critically engages Dreyfus's widely read interpretation of Heidegger's Being and Time . It argues that Dreyfus's reading is rooted in two primary claims or interpretative principles. The first - the Cartesianism thesis - indicates that Heidegger's objective in Being and Time is to overturn Cartesianism. The second - the hermeneutics of suspicion thesis - claims that Division II is supposed to suspect and throw into question the results of the Division I analysis. These theses contribute to (...)
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  19. Problems of Cartesianism.Thomas M. Lennon, John M. Nicholas & John W. Davis - 1984 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 174 (4):471-474.
    The typical Cartesian collection contains papers which treat the problems arising out of Descartes's philosophy as though they and it appeared for the first time in a recent journal. The approach of this collection is quite different. The eight contributors concentrate on problems faced by Cartesianism which are of historical significance. Without denigrating the importance of the technique of exploiting the texts in a manner that appeals to contemporary philosophical interests, the contributors show how Cartesianism was shaped over (...)
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  20.  19
    The Radical Cartesianism of Robert Desgabets and the Scholastic Heritage.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):46-68.
    Robert Desgabets has been described as a ‘radical Cartesian’. Drawing conclusions from Descartes's thought that Descartes himself had failed to see, Desgabets treated Cartesianism as a work in progress that awaited further enrichment and development. But, as scholars have recognized, Desgabets's writings also betray a significant indebtedness to scholastic tradition. In presenting his philosophy, Desgabets often appeals to traditional notions, breathing new life into scholastic concepts and ideas. This paper investigates what we are to make of the scholastic vestiges (...)
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  21.  4
    Questioning Mechanism: Fénelon’s Oblique Cartesianism.Benigni Fiormichele - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):663-680.
    Cartesianism appeared inexorably to produce disparate theoretical tendencies inside itself, and Spinoza’s philosophy was one of the most outrageous and strangest result of those tendencies. This explains why so many Cartesians felt the urge to deal with the thought of the Dutch philosopher, from time to time labelled as ‘monism’, ‘pantheism’, or ‘atheism’. The case of Fénelon, the Quietist theologian, tutor of the Princes of France and brilliant Cartesian philosopher, highlights the difficulties of such an operation. The Archbishop of (...)
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  22.  9
    Cartesianism and Port-Royal in Descartes and His Contemporaries.Steven Nadler - 1988 - The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    CONTRARY TO WHAT APPEARS TO BE POPULAR BELIEF, PORT-ROYAL WAS NOT A BASTION OF CARTESIANISM. IN FACT, OF ALL THE PORT-ROYALISTS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, ONLY ARNAULD CAN BE CONSIDERED A CARTESIAN IN ANY INTERESTING SENSE. MOST OF THE OTHERS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ORDER WERE HOSTILE TO THE NEW PHILOSOPHY AND ACTIVELY CAMPAIGNED AGAINST IT, BELIEVING IT TO POSE A THREAT TO PIETY AND "TRUE" RELIGION. THIS CAN BE SEEN BY EXAMINING THE WRITINGS OF DE SACY, DU VAUCEL, AND (...)
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  23.  9
    The Relevance of Cartesianism.Vincent Carraud - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:69-81.
    A philosophy need not be afraid of being out-of-date. Any true philosophy, untimely as soon as it is published, necessarily remains so, thus necessarily remains relevant. This is the case of Descartes' philosophy. But in the case of Cartesianism, there is more to it: Descartes' philosophy goes in quest of the decisive, the principle, the very first Beginning. And the philosophy in quest of the Beginning is, indeed, a radical and original philosophy: what keeps its interest to Descartes' project (...)
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  24.  4
    Recalcitrant Quasi-Cartesianism in Recent Philosophy of Mind.Bijoy Boruah - 1996 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 23 (1-2):141.
    Contemporary quasi-Cartesianism about mental phenomena is the view of the perspectival nature of consciousness and the inscrutability of phenomenal experience, both being first-person-centered. It adverts to the insusceptibility of mental phenomena to third-person-centered, scientific description and explanation, but does not sympathize with the ontology of substance dualism. This view finds its clearest manifestation in contemporary agnostic naturalism.
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  25. Canadian and American Dissertationson Descanes and Cartesianism 1865-1984.Donald A. Cress - 1987 - Philosophy Research Archives 13 (9999):1-21.
    Gregor Sebba's monumental Bibliographia Cartesiana; A Critical Guide to the Descartes Literature 1800-1960 is the basic bibliographical tool of pre-1960 Descartes scholarship. While somewhat weak in its coverage of twentieth century Anglo-American analytical literature on Descartes, it is outstanding ic its coverage of continental scholarship. Willis Doney's "Bibliography," in his Descartes: A Collection of Critical Essays, largely rectifies Sebba’s lack of coverage of pre-1960 analytical work on Descartes. Subsequent to Doney's 1967 bibliography, there have been several useful bibliographical updates, including (...)
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  26. Problems of Cartesianism.Thomas M. Lennon - 1982 - Institute for Research on Public Policy.
    The typical Cartesian collection contains papers which treat the problems arising out of Descartes's philosophy as though they and it appeared for the first time in a recent journal. The approach of this collection is quite different. The eight contributors concentrate on problems faced by Cartesianism which are of historical significance. Without denigrating the importance of the technique of exploiting the texts in a manner that appeals to contemporary philosophical interests, the contributors show how Cartesianism was shaped over (...)
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  27.  12
    The Flight to Objectivity: Essays on Cartesianism and Culture.Susan R. Bordo - 1987 - State University of New York Press.
    The Flight to Objectivity offers a new reading of Descartes' Meditations informed by cultural history, psychoanalytic and cognitive psychology, and feminist thought.
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  28.  46
    The Cartesianism of Phenomenology.Steven Crowell - 2002 - Continental Philosophy Review 35 (4):433-454.
  29.  39
    Cartesianism and Intersubjectivity in Paranormal Activity and the Philosophy of Mind.Steve Jones - 2017 - Film-Philosophy 21 (1):1-19.
    Over the last century within the philosophy of mind, the intersubjective model of self has gained traction as a viable alternative to the oft-criticised Cartesian solipsistic paradigm. These two models are presented as incompatible inasmuch as Cartesians perceive other minds as “a problem” for the self, while intersubjectivists insist that sociality is foundational to selfhood. This essay uses the Paranormal Activity series (2007–2015) to explore this philosophical debate. It is argued that these films simultaneously evoke Cartesian premises (via found-footage camerawork), (...)
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  30.  29
    Anti-Cartesianism and Anti-Brentanism: The Problem of Anti-Representationalist Intentionalism.Jean-Michel Roy - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (S1):90-125.
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  31. Cartesianism, Neo-Reidianism, and the A Priori: Reply to Pust.Gregory Stoutenburg - 2015 - Logos and Episteme 6 (2):231–235.
    Joel Pust has recently challenged the Thomas Reid-inspired argument against the reliability of the a priori defended by Alvin Plantinga, Nicholas Wolterstorff, William Alston, and Michael Bergmann. The Reidian argument alleges that the Cartesian insistence on the primacy of a priori rationality and subjective sensory experience as the foundations of epistemic justification is unwarranted because the same kind of global skeptical scenario that Cartesians recognize as challenging the legitimacy of perceptual beliefs about the external world also undermine the reliability of (...)
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  32.  18
    'Cartesianism' Redux or Situated Knowledges.Don Ihde - 2012 - Foundations of Science 17 (4):369-372.
    Postphenomenology, in a complementary role with other science studies disciplines, remains within the trajectory of those theories which reject early modern epistemology and metaphysics, including rejection of ‘subject’–‘object’ distinctions, and holds, instead, to an inter-relational, co-constitutive ontology. Here the critiques which sometimes echo vestiges of such early modern epistemology are counter-challenged.
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  33.  5
    A Critique of an Epistemic Intellectual Culture: Cartesianism, Normativism and Modern Crises.V. P. J. Arponen - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):84-103.
    The so-called epistemological turn of the Descartes-Locke-Kant tradition is a hallmark of modern philosophy. The broad family of normativism constitutes one major response to the Cartesian heritage building upon some version of the idea that human knowledge, action and sociality build fundamentally upon some form of social agreement and standards. Representationalism and the Cartesian picture more generally have been challenged by normativists but this paper argues that, even where these challenges by normativism have been taken to heart, our intellectual culture (...)
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  34. Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering.Michael Murray - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.
    The existence and extent of animal suffering provides grounds for a serious evidential challenge to theism. In the wake of the Darwinian revolution, this strain of natural atheology has taken on substantially greater significance. In this essay we argue that there are at least four neo-Cartesian views on the nature of animal minds which would serve to deflect this evidential challenge.
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  35.  25
    The Cartesianism of Desgabets and Arnauld and the Problem of the Eternal Truths.Emmanuel Faye - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 2:193-209.
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  36.  97
    Heidegger's Descartes and Heidegger's Cartesianism.R. Matthew Shockey - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):285-311.
    Abstract: Heidegger's Sein und Zeit (SZ) is commonly viewed as one of the 20th century's great anti-Cartesian works, usually because of its attack on the epistemology-driven dualism and mentalism of modern philosophy of mind or its apparent effort to ‘de-center the subject’ in order to privilege being or sociality over the individual. Most who stress one or other of these anti-Cartesian aspects of SZ, however, pay little attention to Heidegger's own direct engagement with Descartes, apart from the compressed discussion in (...)
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  37. Spinoza and Cartesianism (I.).L. Roth - 1923 - Mind 32 (125):12-37.
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  38. Cartesianism and the Kinematics of Mechanisms: Or, How to Find Fixed Reference Frames in a Cartesian Space-Time.Edward Slowik - 1998 - Noûs 32 (3):364-385.
    In De gravitatione, Newton contends that Descartes' physics is fundamentally untenable since the "fixed" spatial landmarks required to ground the concept of inertial motion cannot be secured in the constantly changing Cartesian plenum. Likewise, it is has often been alleged that the collision rules in Descartes' Principles of Philosophy undermine the "relational" view of space and motion advanced in this text. This paper attempts to meet these challenges by investigating the theory of connected gears (or "kinematics of mechanisms") for a (...)
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  39.  86
    Spinoza and Cartesianism (II).L. Roth - 1923 - Mind 32 (126):160-178.
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  40.  42
    The "Fifth Meditation" and Husserl's Cartesianism.David Carr - 1973 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (1):14-35.
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  41.  44
    Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering.Glenn Ross - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.
  42.  36
    Kant's Anti-Cartesianism.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (4):709-.
  43. Causation in Early Modern Philosophy: Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony.Steven M. Nadler (ed.) - 1992 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Three general accounts of causation stand out in early modern philosophy: Cartesian interactionism, occasionalism, and Leibniz's preestablished harmony. The contributors to this volume examine these theories in their philosophical and historical context. They address them both as a means for answering specific questions regarding causal relations and in their relation to one another, in particular, comparing occasionalism and the preestablished harmony as responses to Descartes's metaphysics and physics and the Cartesian account of causation. Philosophers discussed include Descartes, Gassendi, Malebranche, Arnauld, (...)
     
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  44. Social Cartesianism.John Haugeland - 2004 - In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter.
  45. The New Cartesianism : Dividing Mind and Body and Thus Disembodying Care.Suzanne Gordon - 2006 - In Sioban Nelson & Suzanne Gordon (eds.), The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered. Cornell University Press.
  46.  24
    Cartesianism and Feminism. What Reason Has Forgotten; Reasons for Forgetting.Celia Amorós, Ana Uriarte & Linda López Mcalister - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):147-163.
    This paper recovers and pays homage to the arguments in support of the equality of the sexes developed by the Seventeenth Century Cartesian philosopher François Poullain de la Barre (1647-1723).
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  47. Anti-Anti-Cartesianism: Reply to Suart Shanker.Scott Atran & Ximena Lois - unknown
    There have been many criticisms of “nativism” in “Cartesian linguistics,” attacking positions that neither Chomsky nor any well-known generative grammarian has ever thought to defend. Shanker's polemic is no exception. It involves two spurious claims: Cartesian linguistics vitiates understanding language structure and use; nativism permits linguistic anthropology only to “validate” and “apply” generative principles. Briefly, Chomsky's outlines a language system, LS, of the human brain. LS reflexively discriminates and categorizes parts of the flux of human experience as “language,” and develops (...)
     
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  48.  63
    Coding Dualism: Conscious Thought Without Cartesianism or Computationalism.Nigel J. T. Thomas - manuscript
    The principal temptation toward substance dualisms, or otherwise incorporating a question begging homunculus into our psychologies, arises not from the problem of consciousness in general, nor from the problem of intentionality, but from the question of our awareness and understanding of our own mental contents, and the control of the deliberate, conscious thinking in which we employ them. Dennett has called this "Hume's problem". Cognitivist philosophers have generally either denied the experiential reality of thought, as did the Behaviorists, or have (...)
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  49.  14
    Malebranche's Cartesianism and Lockean Colors.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (4):387-403.
  50.  14
    The Language of Science and the Science of Language: Chomsky’s Cartesianism.David Golumbia - 2015 - Diacritics 43 (1):38-62.
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