Search results for 'causal theory of perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  99
    Pendaran Roberts, Keith Allen & Kelly Schmidtke (forthcoming). Folk Intuitions About the Causal Theory of Perception. Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    It is widely held by philosophers not only that there is a causal condition on perception but also that the causal condition is a conceptual truth about perception. One influential line of argument for this claim is based on intuitive responses to a style of thought experiment popularized by Grice. Given the significance of these thought experiments to the literature, it is important to see whether the folk in fact respond to these cases in the way (...)
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  2.  57
    Naomi Eilan (2015). A Relational Response to Newman's Objection to Russell's Causal Theory of Perception. Theoria 81 (1):4-26.
    The causal theory of perception has come under a great deal of critical scrutiny from philosophers of mind interested in the nature of perception. M. H. Newman's set-theoretic objection to Russell's structuralist version of the CTP, in his 1928 paper “Mr Russell's Causal Theory of Perception” has not, to my knowledge, figured in these discussions. In this paper I aim to show that it should: Newman's objection can be generalized to yield a particularly (...)
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  3.  49
    Walter Horn (2012). Note on Two Snowdon Criticisms of the Causal Theory of Perception. Acta Analytica 27 (4):441-447.
    Two arguments Paul Snowdon has brought against the causal theory of perception are examined. One involves the claim that, based on the phenomenology of perceptual situations, it cannot be the case that perception is an essentially causal concept. The other is a reductio , according to which causal theorists’ arguments imply that a proposition Snowdon takes to be obviously non-causal ( A is married to B ) can be analyzed into some sort of (...)
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  4. Tadeusz Szubka (2002). The Causal Theory of Perception and Direct Realism. In Pragmatism and Realism. New York: Routledge.
  5.  61
    Valtteri Arstila & Kalle Pihlainen (2009). The Causal Theory of Perception Revisited. Erkenntnis 70 (3):397-417.
    It is generally agreed upon that Grice's causal theory of perception describes a necessary condition for perception. It does not describe sufficient conditions, however, since there are entities in causal chains that we do not perceive and not all causal chains yield perceptions. One strategy for overcoming these problems is that of strengthening the notion of causality. Another is that of specifying the criteria according to which perceptual experiences should match the way the world (...)
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  6.  48
    Jan Almäng (2013). The Causal Self‐Referential Theory of Perception Revisited. Dialectica 67 (1):29-53.
    This is a paper about The Causal Self-Referential Theory of Perception. According to The Causal Self-Referential Theory as developed by above all John Searle and David Woodruff Smith, perceptual content is satisfied by an object only if the object in question has caused the perceptual experience. I argue initially that Searle's account cannot explain the distinction between hallucination and illusion since it requires that the state of affairs that is presented in the perceptual experience must (...)
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  7.  60
    Gerald Vision (1996). Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception. New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this book Gerald Vision argues for a new causal theory, one that engages provocatively with direct realism and makes no use of a now discredited subjectivism.
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  8. H. P. Grice (1961). The Causal Theory of Perception, Part I. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 121:121-152.
     
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  9. Robert Greenberg (2016). 2. Causal Theories of Objects and Grice’s Causal Theory of Perception. In The Bounds of Freedom: Kant’s Causal Theory of Action. De Gruyter. pp. 14-40.
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  10. J. Watling (1950). The Causal Theory of Perception. Mind 59 (October):539-540.
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  11. Alan R. White (1961). The Causal Theory of Perception, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 153:153-168.
     
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  12. Thomas B. Frost (1990). In Defense of the Causal Representative Theory of Perception. Dialogue 32 (2-3):43-50.
     
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  13. H. P. Grice (1988). The Causal Theory of Perception. In Jonathan Dancy (ed.), Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume. Oxford University Press. pp. 121-168.
     
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  14. M. H. A. Newman (1928). Mr. Russell's Causal Theory of Perception. Mind 5 (146):26-43.
  15. John Hyman (1992). The Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):277-296.
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  16.  10
    C. H. Whiteley (1940). The Causal Theory of Perception. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 40:89-102.
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  17. Gerald Vision (1993). Animadversions on the Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (172):344-356.
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  18.  66
    F. R. Pickering (1974). A Refutation of an Objection to the Causal Theory of Perception. Analysis 34 (March):129-132.
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  19.  31
    L. Jonathan Cohen (1977). The Causal Theory of Perception. Aristotelian Society 127:127-141.
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  20.  39
    Robert A. Oakes (1978). How to Rescue the Traditional Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (March):370-383.
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  21.  47
    H. P. Grice & Alan R. White (1961). Symposium: The Causal Theory of Perception. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 35:121 - 168.
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  22. Virgil C. Aldrich (1932). Taking the Causal Theory of Perception Seriously. Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):69-78.
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  23. Johannes Roessler (2011). 1 Strawson's Rationale for the Causal Theory of Perception. In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press. pp. 103.
     
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  24.  17
    John Heffner (1981). The Causal Theory of Visual Perception. International Philosophical Quarterly 21 (3):301-330.
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  25. Michael P. Bradie (1976). The Causal Theory of Perception. Synthese 33 (2-4):41 - 74.
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  26. Grover Maxwell (1972). Scientific Methodology and the Causal Theory of Perception. In Herbert Feigl, Wilfrid Sellars & Keith Lehrer (eds.), New Readings in Philosophical Analysis. Appleton-Century-Crofts. pp. 289-314.
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  27.  1
    H. P. Grice & Alan R. White (1961). The Causal Theory of Perception. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 35 (1):121-168.
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  28.  2
    Alex Byrne & Gerald Vission (1999). Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophical Review 108 (3):415.
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  29.  28
    Clement Dore (1964). Ayer on the Causal Theory of Perception. Mind 73 (290):287-290.
  30. A. J. Ayer & L. J. Cohen (1977). The Causal Theory of Perception. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 51 (1):105-142.
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  31.  11
    Lawrence Hass (1991). The Antinomy of Perception: Merleau-Ponty and Causal Representation Theory. [REVIEW] Man and World 24 (1):13-25.
  32.  35
    Sean Wilkie (1996). The Causal Theory of Veridical Hallucinations. Philosophy 71 (276):245-254.
    At the very heart of the causal theory of perception are the peculiar examples sometimes called veridical hallucinations. These examples originate with Grice, who used them to prove ‘conclusively’ that when we say, for example, ‘Jane saw John’, we mean that John is the cause of certain visual experiences or impressions had by Jane.
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  33.  68
    Steven L. Reynolds (2003). The Model Theoretic Argument, Indirect Realism, and the Causal Theory of Reference Objection. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):146-154.
    Abstract: Hilary Putnam has reformulated his model-theoretic argument as an argument against indirect realism in the philosophy of perception. This new argument is reviewed and defended. Putnam’s new focus on philosophical theories of perception (instead of metaphysical realism) makes better sense of his previous responses to the objection from the causal theory of reference. It is argued that the model-theoretic argument can also be construed as an argument that holders of a causal theory of (...)
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  34.  26
    Patrick Joseph McDonald (2003). Demonstration by Simulation: The Philosophical Significance of Experiment in Helmholtz's Theory of Perception. Perspectives on Science 11 (2):170-207.
    : Understanding Helmholtz's philosophy of science requires attention to his experimental practice. I sketch out such a project by showing how experiment shapes his theory of perception in three ways. One, the theory emerged out of empirical and experimental research. Two, the concept of experiment fills a critical conceptual gap in his theory of perception. Experiment functions not merely as a scientific technique, but also as a general epistemological strategy. Three, Helmholtz's experimental practice provides essential (...)
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  35.  5
    Stephen A. Dinan (1979). Spontaneity and Perception in Sartre's Theory of the Body. Philosophy Today 23 (3):279-291.
    It is commonly recognized that sartre's philosophy rests upon a doctrine of radical freedom or, More technically, The absolute spontaneity of conscious acts. Simply put, Sartre believes that consciousness alone determines its own intentional mode of being. But one such intentional mode of being is perception, In which sensible appearances seem to be radically dependent upon changes in the body's sense organs. The purpose of this paper is to examine sartre's theory of the body and critically analyze his (...)
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  36. John Michael & Miles Macleod (2013). Applying the Causal Theory of Reference to Intentional Concepts. Philosophy of Science 80 (2):212-230.
    We argue that many recent philosophical discussions about the reference of everyday concepts of intentional states have implicitly been predicated on descriptive theories of reference. To rectify this, we attempt to demonstrate how a causal theory can be applied to intentional concepts. Specifically, we argue that some phenomena in early social de- velopment ðe.g., mimicry, gaze following, and emotional contagionÞ can serve as refer- ence fixers that enable children to track others’ intentional states and, thus, to refer to (...)
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  37.  58
    Kirk Ludwig (1992). Brains in a Vat, Subjectivity, and the Causal Theory of Reference. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:313-345.
    This paper evaluates Putnam’s argument in the first chapter of Reason, Truth and History, for the claim that we can know that we are not brains in a vat (of a certain sort). A widespread response to Putnam’s argument has been that if it were successful not only the world but the meanings of our words (and consequently our thoughts) would be beyond the pale of knowledge, because a causal theory of reference is not compatible with our having (...)
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  38. Valer Ambrus (1999). Is Putnam's Causal Theory of Meaning Compatible with Internal Realism? Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):1-16.
    Putnam originally developed his causal theory of meaning in order to support scientific realism and reject the notion of incommensurability. Later he gave up this position and adopted instead what he called ‘internal realism’, but apparently without changing his mind on topics related to his former philosophy of language. The question must arise whether internal realism, which actually is a species of antirealism, is compatible with the causal theory of meaning. In giving an answer I begin (...)
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  39. Sonam Thakchoe (2012). Candrakīrti’s Theory of Perception: A Case for Non-Foundationalist Epistemology in Madhyamaka. Acta Orientalia Vilnensia 11 (1):93-125.
    Some argue that Candrakīrti is committed to rejecting all theories of perception in virtue of the rejection of the foundationalisms of the Nyāya and the Pramāṇika. Others argue that Candrakīrti endorses the Nyāya theory of perception. In this paper, I will propose an alternative non-foundationalist theory of perception for Candrakīriti. I will show that Candrakrti’s works provide us sufficient evidence to defend a typical Prāsagika’s account of perception that, I argue, complements his core non-foundationalist (...)
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  40. James Woodward (2003). Making Things Happen: A Theory of Causal Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Woodward's long awaited book is an attempt to construct a comprehensive account of causation explanation that applies to a wide variety of causal and explanatory claims in different areas of science and everyday life. The book engages some of the relevant literature from other disciplines, as Woodward weaves together examples, counterexamples, criticisms, defenses, objections, and replies into a convincing defense of the core of his theory, which is that we can analyze causation by appeal to the notion of (...)
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  41.  54
    Gary Hatfield (1993). Book Review:Historical Roots of Cognitive Science: The Rise of a Cognitive Theory of Perception From Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century Theo C. Meyering. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 60 (4):662-666.
    Review of THEO C. MEYERING, Historical Roots of Cognitive Science : The Rise of a Cognitive Theory of Perception from Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. Boston: Kluwer, xix + 250 pp. $69.00. Examines the author's interpretation of Aristotelian theories of perceptual cognition, early modern theories, and Helmholtz's theory.
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  42.  80
    Jonathan D. Payton (2015). Con-Reasons and the Causal Theory of Action. Philosophical Explorations 18 (1):20-33.
    A con-reason is a reason which plays a role in motivating and explaining an agent's behaviour, but which the agent takes to count against the course of action taken. Most accounts of motivating reasons in the philosophy of action do not allow such things to exist. In this essay, I pursue two aims. First, I argue that, whatever metaphysical story we tell about the relation between motivating reasons and action, con- reasons need to be acknowledged, as they play an explanatory (...)
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  43.  16
    Sarah Robins (2016). Representing the Past: Memory Traces and the Causal Theory of Memory. Philosophical Studies 173 (11):2993-3013.
    According to the Causal Theory of Memory, remembering a particular past event requires a causal connection between that event and its subsequent representation in memory, specifically, a connection sustained by a memory trace. The CTM is the default view of memory in contemporary philosophy, but debates persist over what the involved memory traces must be like. Martin and Deutscher argued that the CTM required memory traces to be structural analogues of past events. Bernecker and Michaelian, contemporary CTM (...)
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  44.  91
    Sharon Ford (2012). Objects, Discreteness, and Pure Power Theories: George Molnar’s Critique of Sydney Shoemaker’s Causal Theory of Properties. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 13 (2):195-215.
    Sydney Shoemaker’s causal theory of properties is an important starting place for some contemporary metaphysical perspectives concerning the nature of properties. In this paper, I discuss the causal and intrinsic criteria that Shoemaker stipulates for the identity of genuine properties and relations, and address George Molnar’s criticism that holding both criteria presents an unbridgeable hypothesis in the causal theory of properties. The causal criterion requires that properties and relations contribute to the causal powers (...)
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  45. Matthew McAdam (2007). Self-Movement and Natural Normativity: Keeping Agents in the Causal Theory of Action. Dissertation, Georgetown University
    Most contemporary philosophers of action accept Aristotle’s view that actions involve movements generated by an internal cause. This is reflected in the wide support enjoyed by the Causal Theory of Action (CTA), according to which actions are bodily movements caused by mental states. Some critics argue that CTA suffers from the Problem of Disappearing Agents (PDA), the complaint that CTA excludes agents because it reduces them to mere passive arenas in which certain events and processes take place. Extant (...)
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  46.  46
    Gerhard Schurz & Alexander Gebharter (2016). Causality as a Theoretical Concept: Explanatory Warrant and Empirical Content of the Theory of Causal Nets. Synthese 193 (4):1073-1103.
    We start this paper by arguing that causality should, in analogy with force in Newtonian physics, be understood as a theoretical concept that is not explicated by a single definition, but by the axioms of a theory. Such an understanding of causality implicitly underlies the well-known theory of causal nets and has been explicitly promoted by Glymour. In this paper we investigate the explanatory warrant and empirical content of TCN. We sketch how the assumption of directed cause–effect (...)
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  47. Rick Grush (2004). The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference (...)
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  48.  3
    Seymour Wapner, Heinz Warner, Jan H. Bruell & Alvin G. Goldstein (1953). Experiments on Sensory-Tonic Field Theory of Perception: VII. Effect of Asymmetrical Extent and Starting Positions of Figures on the Visual Apparent Median Plane. Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (4):300.
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  49. E. J. Lowe (1993). Perception: A Causal Representative Theory. In Edmond Leo Wright (ed.), New Representationalisms: Essays in the Philosophy of Perception. Brookfield: Avebury.
     
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  50. István Aranyosi (2009). The Reappearing Act. Acta Analytica 24 (1):1 - 10.
    In his latest book, Roy Sorensen offers a solution to a puzzle he put forward in an earlier article -The Disappearing Act. The puzzle involves various question about how the causal theory perception is to be applied to the case of seeing shadows. Sorensen argues that the puzzle should be taken as bringing out a new way of seeing shadows. I point out a problem for Sorensen’s solution, and offer and defend an alternative view, according to which (...)
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