Results for 'clear and distinct ideas'

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  1. 10. The Fixation of Belief and How to Make Our Ideas Clear.Howtomou Clear - 2003 - In Steven Luper (ed.), Essential Knowledge: Readings in Epistemology. Longman. pp. 95.
     
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  2. Descartes's Early Doctrine of Clear and Distinct Ideas.Stephen Gaukroger - 1992 - Journal of the History of Ideas 53 (4):585-602.
  3. Clear and Distinct Ideas in Eighteenth Century Germany: Metaphysics, Logic, Aesthetics.Colin McQuillan - 2017 - In Manuel Sánchez-Rodríguez & Miguel Escribano (eds.), Leibniz en Dialogo. Seville: Themata.
  4. Clear and Distinct Perception in Descartes's Philosophy.Shoshana Smith - 2005 - Dissertation, University of California Berkeley
    (Shoshana Smith now goes by her married name, Shoshana Brassfield: http://philpapers.org/profile/37640) Descartes famously claims that everything we perceive clearly and distinctly is true. Although this rule is fundamental to Descartes’s theory of knowledge, readers from Gassendi and Leibniz onward have complained that unless Descartes can say explicitly what clear and distinct perception is, how we know when we have it, and why it cannot be wrong, then the rule is empty. I offer a detailed analysis of clear (...)
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  5. Objective Being and “Ofness” in Descartes.Lionel Shapiro - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):378-418.
    It is generally assumed that Descartes invokes “objective being in the intellect” in order to explain or describe an idea’s status as being “of something.” I argue that this assumption is mistaken. As emerges in his discussion of “materially false ideas” in the Fourth Replies, Descartes recognizes two senses of ‘idea of’. One, a theoretical sense, is itself introduced in terms of objective being. Hence Descartes can’t be introducing objective being to explain or describe “ofness” understood in this sense. (...)
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  6.  65
    ‘Descartes’s One Rule of Logic’: Gassendi’s Critique of the Doctrine of Clear and Distinct Perception.Antonia LoLordo - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):51 – 72.
    This is about Gassendi's 5th Objections to the Meditations and Descartes' Reply. The main issue is what clear and distinct perception consists in and whether we need a criterion in order to know if we perceive something clearly and distinctly.
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  7.  21
    Descartes and Husserl on “Clear and Distinct”.Haojun Zhang - 2019 - Husserl Studies 35 (1):51-72.
    The term “clear and distinct” is used by both Descartes and Husserl when they talk about the truth of an idea and the evidence of judgment. Although the words “clear” and “distinct” are juxtaposed with the conjunction “and,” this does not mean that their status is equal. If the concept of “evidence” can be used to characterize the hierarchical relationship between them, then we can say that, for Descartes, distinct evidence is higher than clear (...)
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  8.  63
    God and Descartes' Principle of Clear and Distinct Knowledge.Sara F. García-Gómez - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:283-302.
    In the present study of Descartes’ epistemological investigations, I have tried to show that his renowned principle of clarity and distinctness is not, in fact, one but two axioms. Most interpreters and critics have taken the two formulations of such a principle here considered as successive moments of it. At best, this position is insufficient, for each “version” of the principle of clarity and distinctness guarantees different kinds of cognitive content. Moreover, while the validity of one “version” is not dependent (...)
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  9.  12
    God and Descartes’ Principle of Clear and Distinct Knowledge.Sara F. García-Gómez - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:283-302.
    In the present study of Descartes’ epistemological investigations, I have tried to show that his renowned principle of clarity and distinctness is not, in fact, one but two axioms. Most interpreters and critics have taken the two formulations of such a principle here considered as successive moments of it. At best, this position is insufficient, for each “version” of the principle of clarity and distinctness guarantees different kinds of cognitive content. Moreover, while the validity of one “version” is not dependent (...)
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  10.  11
    Distinct Ideas and Perfect Solicitude: Alexander of Hales, Richard Rufus, and Odo Rigaldus.Rega Wood - 1993 - Franciscan Studies 53 (1):7-31.
  11.  22
    Locke's Way of Ideas as Context for His Theory of Education in Of the Conduct of the Understanding.Paul Schuurman - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):45-59.
    The central theme of John Locke's Of the Conduct of the Understanding is human error. The Conduct was conceived as an additional chapter to An Essay concerning Understanding, but it was never finished and published posthumously in 1706 as a separate work. Modern authors have regarded the Conduct as an educational treatise. Indeed, the analysis in this work of the nature and causes of error and the ways to prevent and remedy error gives rise to numerous educational reflections. However, the (...)
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    Locke's Way of Ideas as Context for His Theory of Education in Of the Conduct of the Understanding.Paul Schuurman - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):45-59.
    The central theme of John Locke's Of the Conduct of the Understanding is human error. The Conduct was conceived as an additional chapter to An Essay concerning Understanding, but it was never finished and published posthumously in 1706 as a separate work. Modern authors have regarded the Conduct as an educational treatise. Indeed, the analysis in this work of the nature and causes of error and the ways to prevent and remedy error gives rise to numerous educational reflections. However, the (...)
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  13.  91
    On Clear and Confused Ideas: An Essay About Substance Concepts.Ruth Garrett Millikan - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Written by one of today's most creative and innovative philosophers, Ruth Garrett Millikan, this book examines basic empirical concepts; how they are acquired, how they function, and how they have been misrepresented in the traditional philosophical literature. Millikan places cognitive psychology in an evolutionary context where human cognition is assumed to be an outgrowth of primitive forms of mentality, and assumed to have 'functions' in the biological sense. Of particular interest are her discussions of the nature of abilities as different (...)
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  14.  14
    Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume's Skepticism and Naturalism Concerning Knowledge and Causation by Graciela De Pierris. [REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):678-680.
    De Pierris offers a reading that unites radical skepticism and normative naturalism as “two equally important and mutually complementary aspects of Hume’s philosophical position”. The “modern theory of ideas” shapes skepticism, and Newtonian methodology is the basis for naturalism.The “modern theory of ideas” holds that evidence for optimal human cognition is grounded in the “immediate acquaintance with ostensive presentations that are or have been given to the mind”. This is the “presentational-phenomenological model of apprehension”. Descartes introduces to the (...)
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  15. A Fundamental Ambiguity In The Cartesian Theory Of Ideas.Graciela De Pierris - 2002 - Manuscrito 25 (2):105-146.
    Traditionally the modern theory of ideas has been discussed primarily in reference to its alleged introduction of a veil of mental items between the mind and the world, which leads, through the empiricists, to radical skepticism about the existence of an external world. Here I propose to emphasize an entirely different aspect of the Cartesian theory of ideas which, in my view, is more fundamental in opening the empiricist path that leads to Hume’s radical skepticism. I argue that (...)
     
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  16. A Fundamental Ambiguity In The Cartesian Theory Of Ideas: Descartes And Leibniz On Intellectual Apprehension/ Uma Ambiguidade Fundamental Na Teoria Cartesiana Das Idéias: Descartes E Leibniz Sobre A Apreensão Intelectual.Graciela De Pierris - 2007 - Manuscrito 30 (2):383-422.
    Traditionally the modern theory of ideas has been discussed primarily in reference to its alleged introduction of a veil of mental items between the mind and the world, which leads, through the empiricists, to radical skepticism about the existence of an external world. Here I propose to emphasize an entirely different aspect of the Cartesian theory of ideas which, in my view, is more fundamental in opening the empiricist path that leads to Hume’s radical skepticism. I argue that (...)
     
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  17. On Clear and Confused Ideas: An Essay About Substance Concepts.Ruth Garrett Millikan - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):453-466.
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  18.  53
    Transparency and Falsity in Descartes's Theory of Ideas.Claudia Lorena Garcia - 1999 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (3):349 – 372.
    Here I develop an interpretation of Descartes' theory of ideas which differs from the standard reading in that it incorporates a distinction between what an idea appears to represent and what it represents. I argue that this interpretation not only finds support in the texts but also is required to explain a large number of assertions in Descartes which would otherwise appear irremediably obscure or problematic. For example, in my interpretation it is not puzzling that Descartes responds to Arnauld's (...)
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  19.  23
    Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas.Zbigniew Janowski - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (3):643-644.
    Nadler's book is the most complete account of Arnauld's philosophy available in English. First, the author tries to determine Arnauld's philosophical position independently of Descartes' influence. Secondly, and this is a main virtue of Nadler's book, it seeks to clear up the old debate between earlier commentators such as Lovejoy, Church, and Ginsburg about Arnauld's realism. Thirdly, much of the content of the book focuses on the role of the term "idea" in Arnauld's thought. The problem is whether (...) exist independent of our minds or are as mind-dependent for Arnauld as they were for his critic Malebranche. Nadler tries to solve the problem in light of the theological debate which went on in the seventeenth century. If we hold Malebranche's position, Arnauld argues, we surround the mind with a "palace of ideas," cutting it off from external objects. Malebranche's reasoning, Nadler argues, is defective from a theological point of view; if ideas are êtres representatifs distingués des perceptions, or to use Descartes' language, "modalities of the soul are essentially representative of objects which are distinct from the soul," a question arises as to why God had joined soul to body "and yet not allowed the soul to perceive that body [immediately but by means of ideas?]". (shrink)
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  20.  3
    Reasoning About Embryos, Cloning and Stem Cells: Let’s Get More Clear and Distinct.Malcolm Parker - 2003 - Monash Bioethics Review 22 (1):8-17.
    Plural democratic societies encourage and require the tolerance of disparate views. However, in relation to contentious areas like assisted reproductive technologies and destructive embryo research, tolerance is strained by the normative force of our fundamental beliefs about the moral status of early human forms. Yet in the continuing debates, spokespersons for different positions often do not concede all the implications of their arguments, may sidestep the real moral issues, and can fail to be clear about the foundations on which (...)
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  21. Naturaleza de Las Ideas Innatas Cartesianas.Rafael Corazón González - 1993 - Anuario Filosófico 26 (1):47-78.
    Innate ideas are not objective ideas which have ceased to be doubtful. They are not ideas of attributes or modes but rather true realities. Therefore, they are simple, clear, and distinct. These ideas are not possible to analyze. Innate ideas are not conceived when thinking of "something" but when the real world is felt. Therefore, they correspond with objective ideas.
     
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  22.  36
    On Clear and Confused Ideas: An Essay About Substance Concepts. [REVIEW]Robert Cummins, Alexa Lee, Martin Roth, David Byrd & Pierre Poirier - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (2):102-108.
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  23. How to Make Our Ideas Clear.C. S. Peirce - 1878 - Popular Science Monthly 12 (Jan.):286-302.
    This is one of the seminal articles of the pragmatist tradition where C.S. Peirce sets out his doctrine of doubt and belief --and their relationship to inquiry and clarity of our concepts. Originally published in the Popular Science Monthly; and widely available in reprints and collections of Peirce's writings.
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  24. How to Make Our Ideas Clear.Charles Sanders Peirce - 1958 - Problemos 79:169-184.
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  25. Stoics and Skeptics on Clear and Distinct Impressions.Michael Frede - 1983 - In Burnyeat (ed.), The Skeptical Tradition. pp. 65--93.
     
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  26.  31
    On Clear and Confused Ideas: An Essay About Substance Concepts. [REVIEW]Timothy Schroeder - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (1):148-149.
    Here is an apparently straightforward philosophical story about concepts. In the style of Jerry Fodor, a concept is a mental “word” ; it means what it does because of its causal dependencies, and it contributes this meaning to the meanings of the mental “sentences” it helps to form. The mental word OWL means owls because owls have a special causal relationship to OWLs, and when the mental word OWL is combined with other mental words, such as THERE, IS, AN and (...)
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  27. Descartes's Validation of Clear and Distinct Apprehension.Ronald Rubin - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (2):197-208.
  28. Recognizing Clear and Distinct Perceptions.James M. Humber - 1981 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (4):487-507.
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    Ruth Millikan’s On Clear and Confused Ideas.David Papineau & Nicholas Shea - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):453-466.
    Those who know Millikan only for her teleosemantics will find the themes in this book new. And those who think of Millikan as primarily concerned with empirical questions of biology and psychology may be surprised by her range of influences. The book features figures like Wilfred Sellars, P. F. Strawson and Gareth Evans as prominently as any more recent naturalist thinkers.
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  30. How to Make Our Ideas Clear.Charles S. Peirce - 2011 - In Robert B. Talisse & Scott F. Aikin (eds.), The Pragmatism Reader: From Peirce Through the Present. Princeton University Press.
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  31.  50
    Ruth Garrett Millikan: On Clear and Confused Ideas. An Essay About Substance Concepts. [REVIEW]Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):157-161.
  32.  46
    Spinoza's PSR as a Principle of Clear and Distinct Representation.Daniel Schneider - 2014 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (1):109-129.
    It is argued first, that Spinoza's Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR) is best seen as an auxiliary premise and not as an axiom of the Ethics; second, that Spinoza held the PSR to be a self-evident truth that indicates a necessary condition for clearly and distinctly representing the existence or non-existence of a thing; and third, that this interpretation of Spinoza's PSR explains the near absence of the PSR within the demonstrations of the Ethics as well as the importance of (...)
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  33.  48
    Truth, No Doubt: Descartes' Proof That the Clear and Distinct Must Be True.Stanley Tweyman - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):237-258.
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  34.  22
    English and French Versions of C. S. Peirce's "The Fixation of Belief" and "How to Make Our Ideas Clear".Gérard Deledalle - 1981 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17 (2):141 - 152.
  35.  4
    9. How to Make Our Ideas Clear with Metaphors.Zdravko Radman - 1995 - In From a Metaphorical Point of View: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Cognitive Content of Metaphor. De Gruyter. pp. 225-256.
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  36. Magicians, Doubters and Perverts: On Doubting the Clear and Distinct.Gjd Moyal - 1996 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 50 (195):73-107.
     
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  37.  36
    Locke on Clear Ideas, Demonstrative Knowledge, and the Existence of Substance.Ruth Mattern - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):259-271.
  38.  14
    12. Clear and Distinct Perception.Harry G. Frankfurt - 2009 - In Demons, Dreamers, and Madmen: The Defense of Reason in Descartes's "Meditations". Princeton University Press. pp. 175-199.
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  39.  33
    Clear and Distinct Perception and Metaphysical Certainty.P. Markie - 1979 - Mind 88 (349):97-104.
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    Sūkṣma and the Clear and Distinct Light: The Path to Epistemic Enhancement in Yogic and Cartesian Meditation.Gary Jaeger - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):667-692.
    Yoga, like the other five orthodox schools or darśanas of Hindu philosophy, is primarily soteriological in purpose; it offers the hope of salvation from the inevitable suffering of life and the cycle of death and rebirth more broadly. Unlike the other darśanas, its prescribed method for achieving this salvation is meditation, by which the practitioner focuses his or her attention so as to become undisturbed by the fluctuations of his or her own consciousness caused by stimuli in the external world (...)
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  41.  14
    How to Begin to Make Peirce's Ideas Clear.Herman de Regt - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (2):195-197.
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  42.  7
    Truth, No Doubt: Descartes’ Proof That The Clear and Distinct Must Be True.Stanley Tweyman - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):237-258.
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  43. Juxtaposing Descartes and Wittgenstein: The Simple The Clear and the Distinct.Sharad Deshpande - 1996 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 23 (1-2):201-214.
     
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  44. How to Make Our Ideas Clear+ Slovak Translation of Peirce Philosophical Essay (1955).Cs Peirce - 1996 - Filozofia 51 (8):531-544.
     
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  45. How to Make Our Ideas Clear.Charles Peirce - 2016 - Revista Filosofía Uis 15 (2).
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  46. How to Make Hitler's Ideas Clear?John K. Roth - 1984 - Philosophical Forum 16 (1):82.
     
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  47. Meditations on First Philosophy: With Selections From the Objections and Replies.René Descartes - 2008 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In Descartes's Meditations, one of the key texts of Western philosophy, the thinker rejects all his former beliefs in the quest for new certainties. Discovering his own existence as a thinking entity in the very exercise of doubt, he goes on to prove the existence of God, who guarantees his clear and distinct ideas as a means of access to the truth. He develops new conceptions of body and mind, capable of serving as foundations for the new (...)
     
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  48. Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God.Michael Della Rocca - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1–33.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, (...)
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  49.  88
    Contemporary Epistemology and the Cartesian Circle.Daniel Dohrn - 2005 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 8.
    Descartes wants to show that clear and distinct ideas are trustworthy. However, his argument seems circular. For his premise that God is trustworthy depends on clear and distinct insight. Descartes’ reaction to the circularity reproach can be interpreted in two ways. The first is a psychological one. Clear and distinct insights are coercing. Thus they cannot be doubted as long as one attends to them. The argument is only meant to extend this instantaneous (...)
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  50.  49
    Descartes' Cogito: Saved From the Great Shipwreck.Husain Sarkar - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Perhaps the most famous proposition in the history of philosophy is Descartes' cogito 'I think, therefore I am'. Husain Sarkar claims in this provocative interpretation of Descartes that the ancient tradition of reading the cogito as an argument is mistaken. It should, he says, be read as an intuition. Through this interpretative lens, the author reconsiders key Cartesian topics: the ideal inquirer, the role of clear and distinct ideas, the relation of these to the will, memory, the (...)
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