Results for 'co2 emissions'

342 found
Order:
  1.  1
    Climate Change- The Hardest Moral Challenge?Ingmar Persson - 2016 - Public Reason 8 (1-2).
    This paper explores why it is so hard for us to do what we morally ought to do to mitigate anthropogenic climate change by reducing our carbon dioxide, CO2, emissions. It distinguishes between two sources of this difficulty: factors which make us underrate the harm that we individually cause when we perform our everyday CO2 emitting acts and, thus, the wrongness of these acts, and factors which make it difficult for us to cooperate to the extent necessary to mitigate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  28
    Managing the Budget: Stock‐Flow Reasoning and the CO2 Accumulation Problem.Ben R. Newell, Arthur Kary, Chris Moore & Cleotilde Gonzalez - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):138-159.
    The majority of people show persistent poor performance in reasoning about “stock-flow problems” in the laboratory. An important example is the failure to understand the relationship between the “stock” of CO2 in the atmosphere, the “inflow” via anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and the “outflow” via natural CO2 absorption. This study addresses potential causes of reasoning failures in the CO2 accumulation problem and reports two experiments involving a simple re-framing of the task as managing an analogous financial budget. In Experiment 1 (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  9
    Rational Coherence in Environmental Policy: Paris, Montreal, and Kigali.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):4-8.
    In June 2017, President Trump announced that the US intends to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. The decision was widely viewed as an abrogation of US leadership in confronting a changing climate. I’m not interested here in the decision to withdraw from Paris per se. Instead, I’m interested in Paris as a useful contrast for the administration’s attitude towards a different international environmental agreement: the Montreal Protocol.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    In-Country Disparities in Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Their Significance for Politicizing a Future Global Climate Pact.Dan Rabinowitz - 2013 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 14 (1):173-190.
    Mainstream thought on environmental justice emphasizes disparities between populations in terms of their exposure to environmental risks. Climate change has recently shifted attention from vulnerability to responsibility, with much of the research and dissemination of results accentuating differential contributions on the part of various groups to CO2 emissions and their accumulation in the atmosphere. But efforts to monitor, mitigate and adapt to climate change are largely premised on sovereign states as the main units of analysis, and on comparisons between (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  33
    What Range of Future Scenarios Should Climate Policy Be Based On? Modal Falsificationism and its Limitations.Gregor Betz - 2009 - Philosophia Naturalis 46 (1):133-158.
    Climate policy decisions are decisions under uncertainty and are, therefore, based on a range of future climate scenarios, describing possible consequences of alternative policies. Accordingly, the methodology for setting up such a scenario range becomes pivotal in climate policy advice. The preferred methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will be characterised as ,,modal verificationism"; it suffers from severe shortcomings which disqualify it for scientific policy advice. Modal falsificationism, as a more sound alternative, would radically alter the way the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  4
    Mikro-Zertifikate: Für Gerechtigkeit unter Luftverschmutzern.Olaf L. Müller - 2009 - Archiv für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie 95 (2):167-198.
    What would be a fair solution to the problem of climate change? How should we distribute duties and financial burdens of the necessary CO2 reductions if this is to be done in an equitable manner? My answer to these ethical questions is based on a principle formulated by Angela Merkel: Every human has the right to cause as much in terms of CO2 emissions as any other. Unlike the German chancellor who wants to implement this principle only in the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  20
    If You Are Under 40 and Have Trouble Sleeping, Don't Read This.Roy W. Brown - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 112:11.
    Brown, Roy W The International Panel on Climate Change issued its second-last full report in 2007. The experts hoped at that time that, provided sufficient measures were taken soon enough to reduce CO2 emissions, it should be possible to limit global warming to just 2 degrees Celsius over the coming century. But over the past five years and despite the economic downturn, the effects of global warming have been accelerating and the experts' predictions, no doubt mindful of the massive (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  27
    Case Study of Lafarge China and Shui On Cement.Ying Hua & Xiaodi Yang - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:129-143.
    The cement industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries and among the largest CO2 emitters. Cement industry emissions in China have attracted particular attention, due to the country’s rapid growth. Yet few local Chinese cement companies have corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, and even fewer have environmentally related CSR programs. This paper studies the environmentally related CSR practices in mainland China of two companies: Lafarge, a multinational cement company, and Shui On, a Hong Kong-based construction company and developer. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  15
    Case Study of Lafarge China and Shui On Cement: Emission-Related CSR in the Chinese Cement Industry.Ying Hua & Xiaodi Yang - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:129-143.
    The cement industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries and among the largest CO2 emitters. Cement industry emissions in China have attracted particular attention, due to the country’s rapid growth. Yet few local Chinese cement companies have corporate social responsibility programs, and even fewer have environmentally related CSR programs. This paper studies the environmentally related CSR practices in mainland China of two companies: Lafarge, a multinational cement company, and Shui On, a Hong Kong-based construction company and developer. We (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  23
    The Economics Of Hydro And Wind Power In A Carbon Constrained World.Hui Zhu, Cornelis van Kooten & Amy Sopinka - 2010 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 21:145-157.
    To reduce CO2 emissions requires greater reliance on renewable sources of energy for generating electricity, especially adoption of large-scale wind generation. This study investigates possible approaches and/or policies that increase efficient use of renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a cost effective manner. We develop a constrained optimization model of two electricity systems to identify the impact of increasing wind generating capacity and examine how carbon prices (taxes, allowances) impact the penetration of wind power into the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  10
    Corporate Social Responsibility.Diana Mangalagiu - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:212-217.
    Development of carbon neutral energy sources is essential if the US is to reduce the release of greenhouse gases and the associated potential for global climate change. In the US a few giant corporations dominate the energy sector. Furthermore, there has been virtually no federal leadership on energy issues, and the awareness of the issues by the general public, let alone their understanding of them, is low. In Europe, the energy sector is also dominated by a few players, but the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  77
    Climate Change, Moral Integrity, and Obligations to Reduce Individual Greenhouse Gas Emissions.Trevor Hedberg - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):64-80.
    Environmental ethicists have not reached a consensus about whether or not individuals who contribute to climate change have a moral obligation to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, I side with those who think that such individuals do have such an obligation by appealing to the concept of integrity. I argue that adopting a political commitment to work toward a collective solution to climate change—a commitment we all ought to share—requires also adopting a personal commitment to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Climate Change, Individual Emissions, and Foreseeing Harm.Chad Vance - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (5):562-584.
    There are a number of cases where, collectively, groups cause harm, and yet no single individual’s contribution to the collective makes any difference to the amount of harm that is caused. For instance, though human activity is collectively causing climate change, my individual greenhouse gas emissions are neither necessary nor sufficient for any harm that results from climate change. Some (e.g., Sinnott-Armstrong) take this to indicate that there is no individual moral obligation to reduce emissions. There is a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  61
    Subsistence Emissions and Luxury Emissions.Henry Shue - 1993 - Law and Policy 15 (1):39–59.
    In order to decide whether a comprehensive treaty covering all greenhouse gases is the best next step after UNCED, one needs to distinguish among the four questions about the international justice of such international arrangements: (1) What is a fair allocation of the costs of preventing the global warming that is still avoidable?; (2) What is a fair allocation of the costs of coping with the social consequences of the global warming that will not in fact be avoided?; (3) What (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  15.  12
    Making Sense of Dynamic Systems: How Our Understanding of Stocks and Flows Depends on a Global Perspective.Helen Fischer & Cleotilde Gonzalez - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):496-512.
    Stocks and flows are building blocks of dynamic systems: Stocks change through inflows and outflows, such as our bank balance changing with withdrawals and deposits, or atmospheric CO2 with absorptions and emissions. However, people make systematic errors when trying to infer the behavior of dynamic systems, termed SF failure, whose cognitive explanations are yet unknown. We argue that SF failure appears when people focus on specific system elements, rather than on the system structure and gestalt. Using a standard SF (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  60
    Data Trimming, Nuclear Emissions, and Climate Change.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):19-23.
    Ethics requires good science. Many scientists, government leaders, and industry representatives support tripling of global-nuclear-energy capacity on the grounds that nuclear fission is “carbon free” and “releases no greenhouse gases.” However, such claims are scientifically questionable (and thus likely to lead to ethically questionable energy choices) for at least 3 reasons. (i) They rely on trimming the data on nuclear greenhouse-gas emissions (GHGE), perhaps in part because flawed Kyoto Protocol conventions require no full nuclear-fuel-cycle assessment of carbon content. (ii) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. What Climate Policy Can a Utilitarian Justify?Bernward Gesang - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):377-392.
    This essay sketches out what a utilitarian should support when considering global warming along with what measures can be recommended to political leaders for utilitarian reasons. If we estimate the utility of the great advantages that any ambitious climate policy might create in the name of poverty reduction in the present, I will show how a decision can be made in favor of a vigorous climate policy based on such estimates. My argument is independent of the truth of the claims (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  9
    Distributional Obstacles to International Environmental Policy: The Failures at Rio and Prospects After Rio.Joan Martinez-Alier - 1993 - Environmental Values 2 (2):97-124.
    The concept of 'sustainable development' as used by the Brundtland Commission was meant to separate environmental policy from distributional conflicts. Increases in income sometimes are beneficial for the environment, but higher incomes have meant higher emissions of greenhouse gases, and higher rates of genetic erosion. In the aftermath of the Rio conference of June 1992, this article analyses some unavoidable links between distributional conflicts and environmental policy. Often, environmental movements have tried to keep environmental resources and services outside the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  43
    Climate Change: Do We Know Enough for Policy Action? [REVIEW]Stephen H. Schneider - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):607-636.
    The climate change problem must be thought of in terms of risk, not certainty. There are many well-established elements of the problem that carry considerable confidence whereas some aspects are speculative. Therefore, the climate problem emerges not simply as a normal science research issue, but as a risk management policy debate as well. Descriptive science entails using empirical and theoretical methods to quantify the two factors that go into risk assessment: “What can happen?” and “What are the odds?” (Probability x (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  30
    Fairness in Allocating the Global Emissions Budget.David R. Morrow - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (6):669-691.
    One central question of climate justice is how to fairly allocate the global emissions budget. Some commentators hold that the concept of fairness is hopelessly equivocal on this point. Others claim that we need a complete theory of distributive justice to answer the question. This paper argues to the contrary that, given only weak assumptions about fairness, we can show that fairness requires an allocation that is at least as prioritarian as the equal per capita view. Since even the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Equality, Justice and Feasibility: An Ethical Analysis of the WBGU’s Budget Approach.Fabian Schupppert & Christian Seidel - 2015 - Climatic Change 133 (3):397-406.
    According to the Budget Approach proposed by the German Advisory Council on Global Change (WBGU), allocating CO2 emission rights to countries on an equal per-capita basis would provide an ethically justified response to global climate change. In this paper, we will highlight four normative issues which beset the WBGU’s Budget Approach: (1) the approach’s core principle of distributive justice, the principle of equality, and its associated policy of emissions egalitarianism are much more complex than it initially appears; (2) the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  1
    Climate Policy Between Activism and Rationalism.Till Requate - 2010 - Analyse & Kritik 32 (1):159-176.
    This article discusses German and European climate policy, inquiring mainly whether the ambitious goals the EU has set itself can be achieved via the instruments presently employed for the purpose and whether these instruments are efficient. In particular we discuss shortcomings of the European emission trading system, we further level criticism at energy policy measures, notably subsidization for renewable energy sources and the overlap with emissions trading. Further we argue that while 20% reduction of CO2 is feasible at a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Justice and the Distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions.Simon Caney - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):125-146.
    The prospect of dangerous climate change requires Humanity to limit the emission of greenhouse gases. This in turn raises the question of how the permission to emit greenhouse gases should be distributed and among whom. In this article the author criticises three principles of distributive justice that have often been advanced in this context. He also argues that the predominantly statist way in which the question is framed occludes some morally relevant considerations. The latter part of the article turns from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  24. Just Emissions.Simon Caney - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (4):255-300.
    This paper examines what would be a fair distribution of the right to emit greenhouse gases. It distinguishes between views that treat the distribution of this right on its own (Isolationist Views) and those that treat it in conjunction with the distribution of other goods (Integrationist Views). The most widely held view treats adopts an Isolationist approach and holds that emission rights should be distributed equally. This paper provides a critique of this 'equal per capita' view, and the isolationist assumptions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  25. How Harmful Are the Average American's Greenhouse Gas Emissions?John Nolt - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):3-10.
    It has sometimes been claimed (usually without evidence) that the harm caused by an individual's participation in a greenhouse-gas-intensive economy is negligible. Using data from several contemporary sources, this paper attempts to estimate the harm done by an average American. This estimate is crude, and further refinements are surely needed. But the upshot is that the average American is responsible, through his/her greenhouse gas emissions, for the suffering and/or deaths of one or two future people.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  26. Individual Responsibility for Carbon Emissions: Is There Anything Wrong with Overdetermining Harm?Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2015 - In Jeremy Moss (ed.), Climate Change and Justice. Cambridge University Press.
    Climate change and other harmful large-scale processes challenge our understandings of individual responsibility. People throughout the world suffer harms—severe shortfalls in health, civic status, or standard of living relative to the vital needs of human beings—as a result of physical processes to which many people appear to contribute. Climate change, polluted air and water, and the erosion of grasslands, for example, occur because a great many people emit carbon and pollutants, build excessively, enable their flocks to overgraze, or otherwise stress (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Historical Emissions and Free-Riding.Axel Gosseries - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (1):36-60.
    Should the current members of a community compensate the victims of their ancestor’s emissions of greenhouse gases? I argue that the previous generation of polluters may not have been morally responsible for the harms they caused.I also accept the view that the polluters’ descendants cannot be morally responsible for their ancestor’s harmful emissions. However, I show that, while granting this, a suitably defined notion of moral free-riding may still account for the moral obligation of the polluters’ descendants to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  28.  57
    Human Rights Versus Emissions Rights: Climate Justice and the Equitable Distribution of Ecological Space.Tim Hayward - 2007 - Ethics and International Affairs 21 (4):431–450.
    Arguing that issues of both emissions and subsistence should be comprehended within a single framework of justice, the proposal here is that this broader framework be developed by reference to the idea of "ecological space.".
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  29.  11
    Does Certified Organic Farming Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Agricultural Production?Julius Alexander McGee - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (2):255-263.
    The increasing prevalence of ecologically sustainable products in consumer markets, such as organic produce, are generally assumed to curtail anthropogenic impacts on the environment. Here I intend to present an alternative perspective on sustainable production by interpreting the relationship between recent rises in organic agriculture and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural production. I construct two time series fixed-effects panel regressions to estimate how increases in organic farmland impact greenhouse gas emissions derived from agricultural production. My analysis finds that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  12
    Compensation for Historical Emissions and Excusable Ignorance.Alexa Zellentin - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (3):258-274.
    This article defends the idea of applying principles of corrective justice to the matter of climate change. In particular, it argues against the excusable ignorance objection, which holds that historical emissions produced at a time when our knowledge of climate change was insufficient ought to be removed from the equation when applying rectificatory principles to this context. In constructing my argument, I rely on a particular interpretation of rectificatory justice and outcome responsibility. I also address the individualism objection by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Moderate Emissions Grandfathering.Carl Knight - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (5):571-592.
    Emissions grandfathering holds that a history of emissions strengthens an agent’s claim for future emission entitlements. Though grandfathering appears to have been influential in actual emission control frameworks, it is rarely taken seriously by philosophers. This article presents an argument for thinking this an oversight. The core of the argument is that members of countries with higher historical emissions are typically burdened with higher costs when transitioning to a given lower level of emissions. According to several (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Bridging The Emissions Gap: A Plea For Taking Up The Slack.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2013 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 3 (1):273-301.
    With the existing commitments to climate change mitigation, global warming is likely to exceed 2°C and to trigger irreversible and harmful threshold effects. The difference between the reductions necessary to keep the 2°C limit and those reductions countries have currently committed to is called the ‘emissions gap’. I argue that capable states not only have a moral duty to make voluntary contributions to bridge that gap, but that complying states ought to make up for the failures of some other (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  61
    Climate Change and Structural Emissions.Monica Aufrecht - 2011 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):201-213.
    Given that mitigating climate change is a large-scale global issue, what obligations do individuals have to lower their personal carbon emissions? I survey recent suggestions by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Dale Jamieson and offer models for thinking about their respective approaches. I then present a third model based on the notion of structural violence. While the three models are not mutually incompatible, each one suggests a different focus for mitigating climate change. In the end, I agree with Sinnott-Armstrong that people (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Climate Change and the Ethics of Individual Emissions: A Response to Sinnott-Armstrong.Ben Almassi - 2012 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):4-21.
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong argues, on the relationship between individual emissions and climate change, that “we cannot claim to know that it is morally wrong to drive a gas guzzler just for fun” or engage in other inessential emissions-producing individual activities. His concern is not uncertainty about the phenomenon of climate change, nor about human contribution to it. Rather, on Sinnott-Armstrong’s analysis the claim of individual moral responsibility for emissions must be grounded in a defensible moral principle, yet no (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. Climate Change and the Ethics of Individual Emissions.Ben Almassi - 2012 - Perspectives 4 (1):4-21.
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong argues, on the relationship between individual emissions and climate change, that “we cannot claim to know that it is morally wrong to drive a gas guzzler just for fun” or engage in other inessential emissions-producing individual activities. His concern is not uncertainty about the phenomenon of climate change, nor about human contribution to it. Rather, on Sinnott-Armstrong’s analysis the claim of individual moral responsibility for emissions must be grounded in a defensible moral principle, yet no (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  15
    Compensating Wrongless Historical Emissions of Grennhouse Gases.L. H. Meyer - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (1):20-35.
    Currently living people cannot be said to be wronged because of the wrongless emissons of greenhouse gases by past people. According to the usual subjunctive-historical understanding of harm, currently living people cannot be said to be harmed by the impact of greenhouse emissions on their well-being. By relying on a subjunctive-threshold notion of harm we can justify conclusions about both the present generation’s duties not to violate the rights of future generations, and the present generation’s duties to compensate currently (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  23
    Cashing in on Climate Change: Political Theory and Global Emissions Trading.Edward A. Page - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):259-279.
    Global climate change raises profound questions for social and political theorists. The human impacts of climate change are sufficiently broad, and generally adverse, to threaten the rights and freedoms of existing and future members of all countries. These impacts will also exacerbate inequalities between rich and poor countries despite the limited role of the latter in their origins. Responding to these impacts will require the implementation of environmental and social policies that are both environmentally effective and consistent with the equality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  27
    Benefiting From Unjust Acts and Benefiting From Injustice: Historical Emissions and the Beneficiary Pays Principle.Brian Berkey - 2017 - In Climate Justice and Historical Emissions. pp. 123-140.
    It is commonly believed that the history of behavior that has contributed to the threat of climate change bears in a significant way on the obligations of current people. In particular, a number of philosophers have defended the Beneficiary Pays Principle, according to which those who have benefited from unjust emitting activity have a special obligation to bear costs of mitigation and adaptation. I claim that versions of the BPP that have been defended by others share a common problematic feature. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  4
    Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Agriculture: Reconciling the Epistemological, Ethical, Political, and Practical Challenges.Robert M. Chiles, Eileen E. Fabian, Daniel Tobin, Scott J. Colby & S. Molly DePue - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (3):341-348.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide further clarity to the technical and policy difficulties associated with mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture by identifying and distilling the core tensions which propagate and animate them. We argue that these complexities exist across four critical dimensions: the epistemological, the ethical, the political, and the practical. Adequately confronting the challenge of agricultural emissions will require improved transparency in emissions measurement, increased science communication, enhanced public participatory mechanisms, and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  20
    Emissions Trading Ethics.Jo Dirix, Wouter Peeters & Sigrid Sterckx - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):60-75.
    Although emissions trading is embraced as a means to curb carbon emissions and to incentivize the use of renewable energy, it is also heavily contested on ethical grounds. We will assess the main fundamental objections and possible counterarguments. Although we sympathize with some of these arguments, we argue that they are unpersuasive when an emissions trading system is well designed: emissions should be accounted ‘upstream,’ on the production rather than the consumer level. Moreover, allowances should be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  26
    Accountability and Emissions Allowance Trading.Martin Freedman & A. J. Stagliano - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:312-313.
    This research concerns accountability by the U.S. electric utility industry for the financial impacts of cap-and-trade emissions allowance activity. We report findings from an extensive examination of disclosure practices for more than 100 facilities that were required to curb pollutant discharges and participate in a government-mandated program of emission allowance distribution and trading.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  13
    Climate Sins of Our Fathers? Historical Accountability in Distributing Emissions Rights.David R. Morrow - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):335-349.
    One major question in climate justice is whether developed countries’ historical emissions are relevant to distributing the burdens of mitigating climate change. To argue that developed countries should bear a greater share of the burdens of mitigation because of their past emissions is to advocate ‘historical accountability.’ Standard arguments for historical accountability rely on corrective justice. These arguments face important objections. By using the notion of a global emissions budget, however, we can reframe the debate over historical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  34
    Subsistence Versus Sustainable Emissions? Equity and Climate Change.Jay Odenbaugh - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (1):1-15.
    In this essay, I first consider what the implications of global climate change will be regarding issues of equity. Secondly, I consider two types of proposals which focus on sustainable emissions and subsistence rights respectively. Thirdly, I consider where these proposal types conflict. Lastly, I argue under plausible assumptions, these two proposals actually imply similar policies regarding global climate change.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  3
    An Analytical Comparison of Various Influential Models of China’s Future Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Role.Yin Le & Yu Jie - 2013 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 14 (1):125-150.
    Projections regarding future energy consumption and carbon emissions are crucial when the aim is to design policy for global emissions control. What is the different models’ take on the projections for global emissions and, in particular, China’s role in the global picture? Do they anticipate similar results? If not, why are the results different? What key parameters do they use, and how do they affect the final findings? This Article attempts to answer these questions and, starting from (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  9
    Émissions historiques et free-riding.Axel Gosseries - 2003 - Archives de Philosophie du Droit 47:301-331.
    Doit-on attendre des membres actuels d'une communauté qu'ils compensent les victimes des émissions de gaz à effet de serre causées par leurs ancêtres? Nous défendons l'idée que les générations précédentes de pollueurs peuvent très bien ne pas être mo-ralement responsables des dommages qu'elles ont causés. Et nous acceptons aussi la position selon laquelle les descendants d'une génération de pollueurs ne sauraient être tenus pour res-ponsables des dommages engendrés par leurs ancêtres. Il n'en subsiste pas moins que même si l'on effectue (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  8
    Reducing Carbon Emissions Worldwide.Frederik Dahlmann & Stephen Brammer - 2013 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 24:144-152.
    This paper prepares an investigation into environmental performance among multinational enterprises in the context of greenhouse gas emissions. The authors offer a theoretical background about how MNCs are faced with opposing choices with regard to standardising or adjusting their local environmental performances. Moreover, we outline a potential methodology for exploring the variation in MNCs’ levels of greenhouse gas emissions around the world.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  3
    Intertexte générique et interprétation des actes de parole dans un corpus d'émissions de plateaux télévisées.Nicolas Desquinabo - 2007 - Corpus (Laboratoire Language) 6:127-152.
    Cet article propose deux mises à l’épreuve d’une modélisation du rôle du contexte dans l’interprétation des actes de parole. Selon notre modèle, les processus interprétatifs se déroulent généralement à partir d’hypothèses contextuelles sur le genre de discours pratiqué par le ou les énonciateur(s) du texte. Ces hypothèses sont activées à l’aide d’indices pluri-sémiotiques péritextuels et textuels. Un intertexte générique est alors mobilisé et oriente les processus interprétatifs, en particulier s’agissant de l’attribution des valeurs illocutoires et interactives probables des actes de (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Human Rights Versus Emissions Rights: Climate Justice and the Equitable Distribution of Ecological Space.Tim Hayward - 2007 - Ethics and International Affairs 21 (4).
    Arguing that issues of both emissions and subsistence should be comprehended within a single framework of justice, the proposal here is that this broader framework be developed by reference to the idea of "ecological space.".
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. My Emissions Make No Difference.Joakim Sandberg - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (3):229-48.
    “Since the actions I perform as an individual only have an inconsequential effect on the threat of climate change,” a common argument goes, “it cannot be morally wrong for me to take my car to work everyday or refuse to recycle.” This argument has received a lot of scorn from philosophers over the years, but has actually been defended in some recent articles. A more systematic treatment of a central set of related issues shows how maneuvering around these issues is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  50.  76
    Climate Justice and Historical Emissions.Lukas H. Meyer & Dominic Roser - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):229-253.
    Climate change can be interpreted as a unique case of historical injustice involving issues of both intergenerational and global justice. We split the issue into two separate questions. First, how should emission rights be distributed? Second, who should come up for the costs of coping with climate change? We regard the first question as being an issue of pure distributive justice and argue on prioritarian grounds that the developing world should receive higher per capita emission rights than the developed world. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
1 — 50 / 342