Results for 'collaboration'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Collaboration, Interdisciplinarity, and the Epistemology of Contemporary Science.Hanne Andersen - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:1-10.
    Over the last decades, science has grown increasingly collaborative and interdisciplinary and has come to depart in important ways from the classical analyses of the development of science that were developed by historically inclined philosophers of science half a century ago. In this paper, I shall provide a new account of the structure and development of contemporary science based on analyses of, first, cognitive resources and their relations to domains, and second of the distribution of cognitive resources among collaborators and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  2. Collaborative Memory Knowledge: A Distributed Reliabilist Perspective.Kourken Michaelian & Santiago Arango-Munoz - 2018 - In M. Meade, C. B. Harris, P. van Bergen, J. Sutton & A. J. Barnier (eds.), Collaborative Remembering: Theories, Research, Applications. Oxford University Press. pp. 231-247.
    Collaborative remembering, in which two or more individuals cooperate to remember together, is an ordinary occurrence. Ordinary though it may be, it challenges traditional understandings of remembering as a cognitive process unfolding within a single subject, as well as traditional understandings of memory knowledge as a justified memory belief held within the mind of a single subject. Collaborative memory has come to be a major area of research in psychology, but it has so far not been investigated in epistemology. In (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  3. Scientific Collaboration: Do Two Heads Need to Be More Than Twice Better Than One?Thomas Boyer-Kassem & Cyrille Imbert - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (4):667-688.
    Epistemic accounts of scientific collaboration usually assume that, one way or another, two heads really are more than twice better than one. We show that this hypothesis is unduly strong. We present a deliberately crude model with unfavorable hypotheses. We show that, even then, when the priority rule is applied, large differences in successfulness can emerge from small differences in efficiency, with sometimes increasing marginal returns. We emphasize that success is sensitive to the structure of competing communities. Our results (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  4.  38
    Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge.Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson & Michael Weisberg (eds.) - 2017 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Current scientific research almost always requires collaboration among several (if not several hundred) specialized researchers. When scientists co-author a journal article, who deserves credit for discoveries or blame for errors? How should scientific institutions promote fruitful collaborations among scientists? In this book, leading philosophers of science address these critical questions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  31
    The Collaborative Enterprise.Antonio Tencati & Laszlo Zsolnai - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):367-376.
    Instead of the currently prevailing competitive model, a more collaborative strategy is needed to address the concerns related to the unsustainability of today’s business. This article aims to explore collaborative approaches where enterprises seek to build long-term, mutually beneficial relationships with all stakeholders and want to produce sustainable values for their whole business ecosystem. Cases here analyzed demonstrate that alternative ways of doing business are possible. These enterprises share more democratic ownership structures, more balanced and broader governance systems, and a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  6.  23
    Collaborative Strategic Management: Strategy Formulation and Implementation by Multi—Organizational Cross—Sector Social Partnerships.Amelia Clarke & Mark Fuller - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):85-101.
    The focus of this article is on multi-organizational cross-sector social partnerships (CSSP), an increasingly common means of addressing complex social and ecological problems that are too extensive to be solved by any one organization. While there is a growing body of literature on CSSP, there is little focus on collaborative strategic management, especially where implementation and outcomes are concerned. This study addresses these gaps by offering a conceptual model of collaborative strategic management, which is then tested through the use of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  7. Consensus Collaboration Enhances Group and Individual Recall Accuracy.Celia Harris, Amanda Barnier & John Sutton - 2012 - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):v.
    We often remember in groups, yet research on collaborative recall finds “collaborative inhibition”: Recalling with others has costs compared to recalling alone. In related paradigms, remembering with others introduces errors into recall. We compared costs and benefits of two collaboration procedures—turn taking and consensus. First, 135 individuals learned a word list and recalled it alone (Recall 1). Then, 45 participants in three-member groups took turns to recall, 45 participants in three-member groups reached a consensus, and 45 participants recalled alone (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  40
    Creating Time: Social Collaboration in Music Improvisation.Ashley E. Walton, Auriel Washburn, Peter Langland-Hassan, Anthony Chemero, Heidi Kloos & Michael J. Richardson - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):95-119.
    Musical collaboration emerges from the complex interaction of environmental and informational constraints, including those of the instruments and the performance context. Music improvisation in particular is more like everyday interaction in that dynamics emerge spontaneously without a rehearsed score or script. We examined how the structure of the musical context affords and shapes interactions between improvising musicians. Six pairs of professional piano players improvised with two different backing tracks while we recorded both the music produced and the movements of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9.  65
    Collaborative Reasoning: Evidence for Collective Rationality.David Moshman Molly Geil - 1998 - Thinking and Reasoning 4 (3):231 – 248.
    Reasoning may be defined as a deliberate effort to coordinate inferences so as to reach justifiable conclusions. Thus defined, reasoning includes collaborative as well as individual forms of cognitive action. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate a circumstance in which collaborative reasoning is qualitatively superior to individual reasoning. The selection task, a well known logical hypothesis-testing problem, was presented to 143 college undergraduates-32 individuals and 20 groups of 5 or 6 interacting peers. The correct (falsification) response pattern (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  10.  79
    Collaborative Knowledge.Paul Thagard - 1997 - Noûs 31 (2):242-261.
    Collaboration is ubiquitous in the natural and social sciences. How collaboration contributes to the development of scientific knowledge can be assessed by considering four different kinds of collaboration in the light of Alvin Goldman's five standards for appraising epistemic practices. A sixth standard is proposed to help understand the importance of theoretical collaborations in cognitive science and other fields. I illustrate the application of these six standards by describing two recent scientific developments in which collaboration has (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  11.  29
    Collaborative Learning in Engineering Ethics.Joseph R. Herkert - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):447-462.
    This paper discusses collaborative learning and its use in an elective course on ethics in engineering. Collaborative learning is a form of active learning in which students learn with and from one another in small groups. The benefits of collaborative learning include improved student performance and enthusiasm for learning, development of communication skills, and greater student appreciation of the importance of judgment and collaboration in solving real-world problems such as those encountered in engineering ethics. Collaborative learning strategies employed in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  12. Embodied Collaboration in Small Groups.Kellie Williamson & John Sutton - 2014 - In C. T. Wolfe (ed.), Brain Theory: Essays in Critical Neurophilosophy. Springer. pp. 107-133.
    Being social creatures in a complex world, we do things together. We act jointly. While cooperation, in its broadest sense, can involve merely getting out of each other’s way, or refusing to deceive other people, it is also essential to human nature that it involves more active forms of collaboration and coordination (Tomasello 2009; Sterelny 2012). We collaborate with others in many ordinary activities which, though at times similar to those of other animals, take unique and diverse cultural and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  31
    COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH, DELIBERATION, AND INNOVATION.K. Brad Wray - 2014 - Episteme 11 (3):291-303.
    I evaluate the extent to which we could learn something about how we should be conducting collaborative research in science from the research on groupthink. I argue that Solomon has set us in the wrong direction, failing to recognize that the consensus in scientific specialties is not the result of deliberation. But the attention to the structure of problem-solving that has emerged in the groupthink research conducted by psychologists can help us see when deliberation could lead to problems for a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  23
    Capturing Collaborative Challenges: Designing Complexity-Sensitive Theories of Change for Cross-Sector Partnerships.Rob van Tulder & Nienke Keen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):315-332.
    Systems change requires complex interventions. Cross-sector partnerships face the daunting task of addressing complex societal problems by aligning different backgrounds, values, ideas and resources. A major challenge for CSPs is how to link the type of partnership to the intervention needed to drive change. Intervention strategies are thereby increasingly based on Theories of Change. Applying ToCs is often a donor requirement, but it also reflects the ambition of a partnership to enhance its transformative potential. The current use of ToCs in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15. Benefits of Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry in Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):546-567.
    In the past decade well-designed research studies have shown that the practice of collaborative philosophical inquiry in schools can have marked cognitive and social benefits. Student academic performance improves, and so too does the social dimension of schooling. These findings are timely, as many countries in Asia and the Pacific are now contemplating introducing Philosophy into their curricula. This paper gives a brief history of collaborative philosophical inquiry before surveying the evidence as to its effectiveness. The evidence is canvassed under (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  16.  75
    Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Philosophy.Andrew Higgins & Alexis Dyschkant - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (3):372-398.
    Many philosophers would, in theory, agree that the methods and tools of philosophy ought to be supplemented by those of other academic disciplines. In practice, however, the sociological data suggest that most philosophers fail to engage or collaborate with other academics, and this article argues that this is problematic for philosophy as a discipline. In relation to the value of interdisciplinary collaboration, the article highlights how experimental philosophers can benefit the field, but only insofar as they draw from the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17. The Epistemic Significance of Collaborative Research.K. Brad Wray - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (1):150-168.
    I examine the epistemic import of collaborative research in science. I develop and defend a functional explanation for its growing importance. Collaborative research is becoming more popular in the natural sciences, and to a lesser degree in the social sciences, because contemporary research in these fields frequently requires access to abundant resources, for which there is great competition. Scientists involved in collaborative research have been very successful in accessing these resources, which has in turn enabled them to realize the epistemic (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  18. Evidential Collaborations: Epistemic and Pragmatic Considerations in "Group Belief".Kent W. Staley - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (3):321 – 335.
    This paper examines the role of evidential considerations in relation to pragmatic concerns in statements of group belief, focusing on scientific collaborations that are constituted in part by the aim of evaluating the evidence for scientific claims (evidential collaborations). Drawing upon a case study in high energy particle physics, I seek to show how pragmatic factors that enter into the decision to issue a group statement contribute positively to the epistemic functioning of such groups, contrary to the implications of much (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  19. A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 2015 - In Jonathan Y. Tsou, Alan Richardson & Flavia Padovani (eds.), Objectivity in Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 189-210.
    Innovative modes of collaboration between archaeologists and Indigenous communities are taking shape in a great many contexts, in the process transforming conventional research practice. While critics object that these partnerships cannot but compromise the objectivity of archaeological science, many of the archaeologists involved argue that their research is substantially enriched by them. I counter objections raised by internal critics and crystalized in philosophical terms by Boghossian, disentangling several different kinds of pluralism evident in these projects and offering an analysis (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  20.  29
    Collaborative International Research: Ethical and Regulatory Issues Pertaining to Human Biological Materials at a South African Institutional Research Ethics Committee.Aslam Sathar, Amaboo Dhai & Stephan Linde - 2014 - Developing World Bioethics 14 (3):150-157.
    Human Biological Materials are an invaluable resource in biomedical research. Objective To determine if researchers and a Research Ethics Committee at a South African institution addressed ethical issues pertaining to HBMs in collaborative research with developed countries. Study Design Ethically approved retrospective cross-sectional descriptive audit. Results Of the 1305 protocols audited, 151 fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria. Compared to other developed countries, a majority of sponsors were from the USA . The principle investigators in all 151 protocols informed the REC (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21.  18
    Epistemic Collaborations: Distributed Cognition and Virtue Reliabilism.Spyridon Palermos - 2020 - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    Strong epistemic anti-individualism—i.e., the claim that knowledge can be irreducibly social—is increasingly debated within mainstream and social epistemology. Most existing approaches attempt to argue for the view on the basis of aggregative analyses, which focus on the way certain groups aggregate the epistemic attitudes of their members. Such approaches are well motivated, given that many groups to which we often ascribe group knowledge—such as juries and committees—operate in this way. Yet another way that group knowledge can be generated is on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  24
    Enhancing Communication & Collaboration in Interdisciplinary Research.Michael O'Rourke, Stephen J. Crowley, Sanford D. Eigenbrode & J. D. Wulfhorst (eds.) - 2014 - Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.
    Enhancing Communication & Collaboration in Interdisciplinary Research, edited by Michael O'Rourke, Stephen Crowley, Sanford D. Eigenbrode, and J. D. Wulfhorst, is a volume of previously unpublished, state-of-the-art chapters on interdisciplinary communication and collaboration written by leading figures and promising junior scholars in the world of interdisciplinary research, education, and administration. Designed to inform both teaching and research, this innovative book covers the spectrum of interdisciplinary activity, offering a timely emphasis on collaborative interdisciplinary work. The book’s four main parts (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23.  26
    Why Collaborate?Jane Maienschein - 1993 - Journal of the History of Biology 26 (2):167-183.
    The recent escalation of concern about scientific integrity has provoked a larger discussion of many questions about why we do science the way we do, as well as about how we should do it. One of these questions concerns collaboration: who should count as a collaborator? This, in turn, raises the question why collaborators collaborate, and whether and when they should. Here, history offers insights that can illuminate the current debate.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24.  27
    Collaborative Enterprise and Sustainability: The Case of Slow Food. [REVIEW]Antonio Tencati & Laszlo Zsolnai - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):345-354.
    The current and prevailing paradigm of intensive agricultural production is a straightforward example of the mainstream way of doing business. Mainstream enterprises are based on a negativistic view of human nature that leads to counter-productive and unsustainable behaviours producing negative impact for society and the natural environment. If we want to change the course, then different players are needed, which can flourish thanks to their capacity to serve others and creating values for all the participants in the network in which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Collaborative Remembering: When Can Remembering With Others Be Beneficial?Celia B. Harris, John Sutton, Paul Keil & Amanda Barnier - unknown
    Experimental memory research has traditionally focused on the individual, and viewed social influence as a source of error or inhibition. However, in everyday life, remembering is often a social activity, and theories from philosophy and psychology predict benefits of shared remembering. In a series of studies, both experimental and more qualitative, we attempted to bridge this gap by examining the effects of collaboration on memory in a variety of situations and in a variety of groups. We discuss our results (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  11
    Collaborative Research on Sustainability: Myths and Conundrums of Interdisciplinary Departments.Kate Sherren, Alden S. Klovdahl, Libby Robin, Linda Butler & Stephen Dovers - 2009 - Journal of Research Practice 5 (1):Article M1.
    Establishing interdisciplinary academic departments has been a common response to the challenge of addressing complex problems. However, the assumptions that guide the formation of such departments are rarely questioned. Additionally, the designers and managers of interdisciplinary academic departments in any field of endeavour struggle to set an organisational climate appropriate to the diversity of their members. This article presents a preliminary analysis of collaborative dynamics within two interdisciplinary university departments in Australia focused on sustainability. Social network diagrams and metrics of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Skill and Collaboration in the Evolution of Human Cognition.John Sutton - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (1):28-36.
    I start with a brief assessment of the implications of Sterelny’s anti-individualist, anti-internalist apprentice learning model for a more historical and interdisciplinary cognitive science. In a selective response I then focus on two core features of his constructive account: collaboration and skill. While affirming the centrality of joint action and decision making, I raise some concerns about the fragility of the conditions under which collaborative cognition brings benefits. I then assess Sterelny’s view of skill acquisition and performance, which runs (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  28.  10
    Understanding Collaborative Consumption: An Extension of the Theory of Planned Behavior with Value-Based Personal Norms.Rüdiger Hahn & Daniel Roos - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):679-697.
    Collaborative consumption is proposed as a potential step beyond unsustainable linear consumption patterns toward more sustainable consumption practices. Despite mounting interest in the topic, little is known about the determinants of this consumer behavior. We use an extended theory of planned behavior to examine the relative influence of consumers’ personal norms and the theory’s basic sociopsychological variables attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control on collaborative consumption. Moreover, we use this framework to examine consumers’ underlying value and belief structure regarding (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  2
    Governing Collaborative Value Creation in the Context of Grand Challenges: A Case Study of a Cross-Sectoral Collaboration in the Textile Industry.Ingrid Wakkee, Jakomijn van Wijk & Lori DiVito - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (5):1092-1131.
    The aim of this study is to understand how governance mechanisms in cross-sector collaborations for sustainability affect value creation and capture and subsequently the survival of this organizational form. Drawing on a longitudinal, participatory, single-case study of collaborative action in the textile industry, we identify three governance mechanisms—safeguarding, bundling and connecting—that coevolve with the rising and waning of collaborative tensions and the shifting levels of action in the CSC we studied. These mechanisms aided value creation and helped facilitate private value (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Power, Bargaining, and Collaboration.Justin Bruner & Cailin O'Connor - 2016 - In T. Boyer, C. Mayo-Wilson & M. Weisberg (eds.), Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge.
    Collaboration is increasingly popular across academia. Collaborative work raises certain ethical questions, however. How will the fruits of collaboration be divided? How will the work for the collaborative project be split? In this paper, we consider the following question in particular. Are there ways in which these divisions systematically disadvantage certain groups? -/- We use evolutionary game theoretic models to address this question. First, we discuss results from O'Connor and Bruner (unpublished). In this paper, we show that underrepresented (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  26
    Different Paths to Collaboration Between Businesses and Civil Society and the Role of Third Parties.Daniel Arenas, Pablo Sanchez & Matthew Murphy - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):723-739.
    In this article, we suggest that one of the unexplored paths toward collaboration between firms and civil society organizations starts with confrontation or potential conflict, and that the transition toward collaboration can be further understood if one focuses on triadic relationships rather than dyadic ones. We analyze the presence of third parties and their different roles to explain how collaboration is facilitated. The article aims at bringing together the bodies of research on business–civil society confrontation and on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. Collaborative Irrationality, Akrasia, and Groupthink: Social Disruptions of Emotion Regulation.Thomas Szanto - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7:1-17.
    The present paper proposes an integrative account of social forms of practical irrationality and corresponding disruptions of individual and group-level emotion regulation. I will especially focus on disruptions in emotion regulation by means of collaborative agential and doxastic akrasia. I begin by distinguishing mutual, communal and collaborative forms of akrasia. Such a taxonomy seems all the more needed as, rather surprisingly, in the face of huge philosophical interest in analysing the possibility, structure and mechanisms of individual practical irrationality, with very (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  75
    Moral Trust & Scientific Collaboration.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):301-310.
    Modern scientific knowledge is increasingly collaborative. Much analysis in social epistemology models scientists as self-interested agents motivated by external inducements and sanctions. However, less research exists on the epistemic import of scientists’ moral concern for their colleagues. I argue that scientists’ trust in their colleagues’ moral motivations is a key component of the rationality of collaboration. On the prevailing account, trust is a matter of mere reliance on the self-interest of one’s colleagues. That is, scientists merely rely on external (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  34.  4
    International Collaboration in Multilayered Center-Periphery in the Globalization of Science and Technology.Kumju Hwang - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (1):101-133.
    This article analyzes international scientific collaboration in the context of the globalization of science and technology as a crossing point not only between local and global identities but also between scientific and sociocultural identities. It also elucidates how international collaboration—where middle scientific actors in the hierarchical multilayered center-periphery in the globalization of science and technology obtain advanced knowledge from core science and technology—takes place and structures the global division of research labor. This article emphasizes that we should develop (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  21
    Do Collaborators in Science Need to Agree?Haixin Dang - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (5).
  36.  21
    Gender-Based Homophily in Collaborations Across a Heterogeneous Scholarly Landscape.Y. Samuel Wang, Carole J. Lee, Jevin D. West, Carl T. Bergstrom & Elena A. Erosheva - manuscript
    Using the corpus of JSTOR articles, we investigate the role of gender in collaboration patterns across the scholarly landscape by analyzing gender-based homophily--the tendency for researchers to co-author with individuals of the same gender. For a nuanced analysis of gender homophily, we develop methodology necessitated by the fact that the data comprises heterogeneous sub-disciplines and that not all authorships are exchangeable. In particular, we distinguish three components of gender homophily in collaborations: a structural component that is due to demographics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  51
    Collaborative Information Environments to Support Knowledge Construction by Communities.Gerry Stahl - 2000 - AI and Society 14 (1):71-97.
    Computer-based design environments for skilled domain workers have recently graduated from research prototypes to commercial products, supporting the learning of individual designers. Such systems do not, however, adequately support the collaborative nature of work or the evolution of knowledge within communities of practice. If innovation is to be supported within collaborative efforts, thesedomain-oriented design environments (DODEs) must be extended to becomecollaborative information environments (CIEs), capable of providing effective community memories for managing information and learning within constantly evolving collaborative contexts. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  74
    Artistic Collaboration and the Completion of Works of Art.Paisley Nathan Livingston & Carol Archer - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):439-455.
    We present an analysis of work completion couched in terms of an effective completion decision identified by its characteristic contents and functions. In our proposal, the artist's completion decision can take a number of distinct forms, including a procedural variety referred to as an ‘extended completion decision’. In the second part of this essay, we address ourselves to the question of whether collaborative art-making projects stand as counterexamples to the proposed analysis of work completion.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  19
    Discussion, Collaborative Knowledge Work and Epistemic Fluency.Peter Goodyear & Maria Zenios - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (4):351-368.
    This paper argues for an action-oriented conception of learning in higher education: one which marries higher order learning with apprenticeship in knowledge work. It introduces epistemic tasks, forms and fluency as constructs that are useful in giving a more precise meaning to ideas about collaboration in knowledge construction. Discussion is seen as central to collaborative knowledge work and we examine the role of discussion in supporting weaker and stronger interpretations of collaborative knowledge construction.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  2
    Transitioning Collaborative Cross-Sector Business Models for Sustainability Innovation: Multilevel Tension Management as a Dynamic Capability.Ana Felgueiras, Vanessa Mato-Santiso & Marta Rey-Garcia - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (5):1132-1173.
    Collaborative cross-sector business models for sustainability innovation in response to grand challenges are rich foci for tensions. This is the case of CCSBMSI targeting independent living through Information and Communication Technology–enabled care. This research aims at identifying the relevant tensions, understanding their interactions, and assessing how they can be effectively managed so that CCSBMSI become more valuable for partners and transformative for society. A conceptual framework that understands the management of interrelated institutional and interorganizational tensions as a dynamic capability is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  12
    Why Collaborative Robots Must Be Social Actors.Kerstin Fischer - 2019 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 23 (3):270-289.
    In this article, I address the question whether or not robots should be social actors and suggest that we do not have much choice but to construe collaborative robots as social actors. Social cues, including emotional displays, serve coordination functions in human interaction and therefore have to be used, even by robots, in order for long-term collaboration to succeed. While robots lack the experiential basis of emotional display, also in human interaction much emotional expression is part of conventional social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  9
    Collaboration in Collaborative Learning.Michael J. Baker - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (3):451-473.
    This paper presents a theorisation of collaborative activity that was developed in the research field known as “collaborative learning”, in order to understand the processes of co-elaboration of meaning and knowledge. Collaboration, as distinguished from cooperation, coordination and collective activity, is defined as a continued and conjoined effort towards elaborating a “joint problem space” of shared representations of the problem to be solved. An approach to analysing the processes of co-construction of a joint problem space is outlined, in terms (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  31
    Collaborative Discovery in a Scientific Domain.Takeshi Okada & Herbert A. Simon - 1997 - Cognitive Science 21 (2):109-146.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  44.  18
    Collaborative Partnership and the Social Value of Clinical Research: A Qualitative Secondary Analysis.Sanna-Maria Nurmi, Arja Halkoaho, Mari Kangasniemi & Anna-Maija Pietilä - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):57.
    Protecting human subjects from being exploited is one of the main ethical challenges for clinical research. However, there is also a responsibility to protect and respect the communities who are hosting the research. Recently, attention has focused on the most efficient way of carrying out clinical research, so that it benefits society by providing valuable research while simultaneously protecting and respecting the human subjects and the communities where the research is conducted. Collaboration between partners plays an important role and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  3
    Collaborative Sustainable Business Models: Understanding Organizations Partnering for Community Sustainability.Barry A. Colbert, Amelia C. Clarke & Eduardo Ordonez-Ponce - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (5):1174-1215.
    Cross-sector social partnerships are relevant units of analysis for understanding sustainable business models. This research examines how organizations value their motivations to participate in large sustainability-focused partnerships, how they perceive the value captured, and their structures implemented to address sustainability partnerships. Two hundred and twenty-four organizations partnering within four large sustainability CSSPs were surveyed using an augmented resource-based view theoretical framework. Results show that partners were motivated by and captured value related to sustainability-, organizational-, and human-oriented resources, and that organizations (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Collaboration in Scientific Practice—-A Social Epistemology of Research Groups.Susann Wagenknecht - 2014 - Dissertation, Aarhus University
    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. -/- On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. We Remember, We Forget: Collaborative Remembering in Older Couples.Celia B. Harris, Paul Keil, John Sutton, Amanda Barnier & Doris McIlwain - 2011 - Discourse Processes 48 (4):267-303.
    Transactive memory theory describes the processes by which benefits for memory can occur when remembering is shared in dyads or groups. In contrast, cognitive psychology experiments demonstrate that social influences on memory disrupt and inhibit individual recall. However, most research in cognitive psychology has focused on groups of strangers recalling relatively meaningless stimuli. In the current study, we examined social influences on memory in groups with a shared history, who were recalling a range of stimuli, from word lists to personal, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  48.  16
    Capturing Collaborative Challenges: Designing Complexity-Sensitive Theories of Change for Cross-Sector Partnerships.Amelia Clarke & Andrew Crane - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):315-332.
    Systems change requires complex interventions. Cross-sector partnerships face the daunting task of addressing complex societal problems by aligning different backgrounds, values, ideas and resources. A major challenge for CSPs is how to link the type of partnership to the intervention needed to drive change. Intervention strategies are thereby increasingly based on Theories of Change. Applying ToCs is often a donor requirement, but it also reflects the ambition of a partnership to enhance its transformative potential. The current use of ToCs in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  8
    Exemplifying Collaborative Autoethnographic Practice Via Shared Stories of Mothering.Patricia Geist-Martin, Lisa Gates, Liesbeth Wiering, Erika Kirby, Renee Houston, Anne Lilly & Juan Moreno - 2010 - Journal of Research Practice 6 (1):Article M8.
    In this piece, we articulate the "collaborative autoethnographic practice" we utilized to illustrate the complexities of mothering that involved: (a) individually writing autoethnographic narratives on mothering, (b) sharing these autoethnographic narratives in a public forum, (c) publicly discussing the heuristic commonalities across these autoethnographic narratives, (d) tying those commonalities back to the literature, and (e) revisiting the autoethnographic narratives for aspects of social critique where our autoethnographic narratives (intentionally or unintentionally) hegemonicaly reproduced cultural scripts. We argue that presenting knowledge of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  15
    Placing Collaborative Circles in Strategic Action Fields: Explaining Differences Between Highly Creative Groups.John N. Parker & Ugo Corte - 2017 - Sociological Theory 35 (4):261-287.
    Collaborative circles theory explains how innovative small groups develop and win acceptance of their creative work but assumes a single type of circle and would benefit from considering how circles are affected by the strategic action fields in which they operate. We do so by synthesizing research on art, science, philosophy, and social movements to identify five field characteristics that influence circles and their creative potentials (i.e., attention space, consensus, social control, resources, and organizational and geographical contexts). We then use (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000