Results for 'coma'

145 found
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  1. A Report of the Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death.Irreversible Coma - 1978 - In John E. Thomas (ed.), Matters of Life and Death: Crises in Bio-Medical Ethics. S. Stevens. pp. 67.
     
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  2.  8
    Algunos aspectos cronológicos en torno a la Ep. 22 de Agustin a Aurelio de Cartago.Francesc Navarro Coma - 2005 - Augustinianum 45 (1):171-184.
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  3.  26
    Long-Lasting Coma.Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni, A. Sant'Angelo, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, C. Gagliardo & G. Galardi - 2014 - Functional Neurology 29 (3):201-205.
    In this report, we describe the case of a patient who has remained in a comatose state for more than one year after a traumatic and hypoxic brain injury. This state, which we refer to as long-lasting coma (LLC), may be a disorder of consciousness with significantly different features from those of conventional coma, the vegetative state, or brain death. On the basis of clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging data, we hypothesize that a multilevel involvement of the ascending reticular (...)
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  4.  94
    Intentional Action and the Post-Coma Patient.Zoe Drayson - 2014 - Topoi 33 (1):23-31.
    Detecting conscious awareness in a patient emerging from a coma state is problematic, because our standard attributions of conscious awareness rely on interpreting bodily movement as intentional action. Where there is an absence of intentional bodily action, as in the vegetative state, can we reliably assume that there is an absence of conscious awareness? Recent neuroimaging work suggests that we can attribute conscious awareness to some patients in a vegetative state by interpreting their brain activity as intentional mental action. (...)
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  5.  11
    Embodiment and Entangled Subjectivity: A Study of Robin Cook’s Coma, Priscille Sibley’s The Promise of Stardust and Alexander Beliaev’s Professor Dowell’s Head.Manali Karmakar & Avishek Parui - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-16.
    The essay examines Robin Cook’s Coma and Priscille Sibley’s The Promise of Stardust that dramatize the reified and disposable status of the brain-dead patients who are classified as nonpersons. The essay argues that the man-machine entanglement as depicted in the novels constructs a deterritorialized and entangled form of subjectivity that intervenes in the dominant biomedical understanding of personhood and agency that we notionally associate with a conscious mind. The essay concludes its arguments by discussing Alexander Beliaev’s Professor Dowell’s Head (...)
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  6. The Biochemical Basis of Coma.J. R. Smythies - 1999 - Psycoloquy 10 (26).
    Current research on the neural basis of consciousness is based mainly on neuroimaging, physiology and psychophysics. This target article reviews what is known about biochemical factors that may contribute to the development of consciousness, based on loss of consciousness (i.e., coma). There are two theories of the biochemical mode of action of general anaesthetics. One is that anaesthesia is a direct (i.e., not receptor-mediated) effect of the anaesthetic on cellular neurophysiological function; the other is that some alteration of receptor (...)
     
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  7.  42
    Neuroimaging After Coma.Quentin Noirhomme - unknown
    Following coma, some patients will recover wakefulness without signs of consciousness (only showing reflex movements, i.e., the vegetative state) or may show non-reflex movements but remain without functional communication (i.e., the minimally conscious state). Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers et. al. BMC Neurol, 9:35, 8) and the clinical and electrophysiological markers of outcome from the vegetative and minimally conscious states remain unsatisfactory. This should incite clinicians to use multimodal assessment to detect (...)
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  8.  8
    Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Hyperglycemic Coma Induced by Methylprednisolone Pulse Therapy for Acute Rejection After Liver Transplantation: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.J. Zhou, W. Ju, X. Yuan, X. Zhu, D. Wang & X. He - 2014 - Transplant Research and Risk Management 2015.
    Jian Zhou,* Weiqiang Ju,* Xiaopeng Yuan, Xiaofeng Zhu, Dongping Wang, Xiaoshun HeOrgan Transplant Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work: Hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma is a serious, rare complication induced by methylprednisolone pulse therapy for acute rejection after orthotopic liver transplantation. Herein, we report an unusual case of a 58-year-old woman who experienced acute rejection at 30 months after OLT, only one case in which HNKHC resulted in (...)
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  9.  19
    Post-Coma Unresponsiveness.Michael Herbert - 2005 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (1):7.
    Herbert, Michael Clinicians are beginning to understand the varied outcomes following severe brain injury, one of which is post-coma unresponsiveness (PCU). However, much still needs to be done to fully comprehend this elusive state. Current clinical knowledge is outlined below.
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  10.  7
    NHMRC Statements on Post-Coma Unresponsiveness.Kevin McGovern - 2007 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 13 (2):9.
    McGovern, Kevin This article reviews three statements from the National Health and Medical Research Council on post-coma unresponsiveness (PCU). One of the functions of the NHMRC is to propose standards and guidelines for health care in Australia. The paper explores the causes and neuropathology of PCU, imaging and other tests and prognosis from unresponsiveness.
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  11.  35
    Coma and Impaired Consciousness: A Clinical Perspective.G. B. Young, A. H. Ropper & C. F. Bolton - 1998 - McGraw-Hill.
    All-encompassing text examines every aspect of coma from neurochemistry, monitoring, and treatments to prognostic factors.
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  12.  70
    Brain Function in Coma, Vegetative State, and Related Disorders.Steven Laureys, Adrian M. Owen & Nicholas D. Schiff - 2004 - Lancet Neurology 3:537-546.
  13. Assessment of Coma and Impaired Consciousness.Graham Teasdale & Bryan Jennett - 1974 - Lancet 2:81-84.
  14. Historia de una coma. Gadamer y el sentido del ser.Gianni Vattimo - 2005 - Endoxa 1 (20):45.
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  15.  11
    Ethical Guidelines for the Care of People in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness (Vegetative State) or a Minimally Responsive State.National Health & Medical Research Council - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  16.  1
    Ethical Guidelines for the Care of People in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness or a Minimally Responsive State.National Health and Medical Researc - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  17.  19
    Philosophical Reflections on Coma.A. A. Howsepian - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (4):735 - 755.
    THE PRIMARY AIM OF THIS ESSAY is to advance discussion on how best to treat comatose patients. Its principal conclusion will be Some purportedly irreversibly comatose humans ought to be kept alive indefinitely. Of course, merely keeping such patients alive is not how best to treat them. How they are being treated while being kept alive is of paramount importance. Note that is compatible with the truth of All comatose humans ought to be kept alive indefinitely. I shall say nothing (...)
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  18.  10
    Irreversible Coma and Withdrawal of Life Support: Is It Murder If the IV Line is Disconnected?B. Towers - 1982 - Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (4):203-205.
  19.  61
    Observer Variability in Assessing Impaired Consciousness and Coma.Graham Teasdale, R. Knill-Jones & J. van der Sande - 1978 - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 41:603-610.
  20.  32
    Coma and Other States of Consciousness: The Differential Diagnosis of Brain Death.J. B. Posner - 1978 - Annals of the New York Academy of Science 315:215-27.
  21.  19
    Reflections on Caring for Patients in a Vegetative State (Post-Coma-Unresponsive Patients).Brian Lewis - 2005 - The Australasian Catholic Record 82 (2):202.
  22. Coma and Other Disorders of Consciousness.M. Jouvet - 1969 - In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland.
  23.  36
    Death as Irreversible Coma: An Appraisal. [REVIEW]David B. Hausman & A. Serge Kappler - 1978 - Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (1):49-52.
  24.  9
    Les Familles En Réanimation : Un Soutien Pour l'Éveil de Coma?Raphaël Minjard, Jean-Marc Talpin & Alain Ferrant - 2013 - Dialogue: Families & Couples 199 (1):119.
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  25.  10
    Is the Glasgow Coma Scale Appropriate for the Evaluation of Elderly Patients in Long-Term Care Units?Frédéric Bloch - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (3):455-456.
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  26.  13
    Reticular Formation, Brain Waves, and Coma.George G. Somjen - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):489-489.
  27.  27
    Consciousness, Coma, and the Vegetative State: Physical Basis and Definitional Character.C. M. de Giorgio & M. F. Lew - 1991 - Issues in Law and Medicine 6:361-371.
  28.  22
    Is Coma Morally Equivalent to Anencephalia?Anthony Serafini - 1993 - Ethics and Behavior 3 (2):187 – 198.
  29.  16
    Coma, Death and Moral Dues: A Response to Serafini.Grant Gillett - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (4):375–377.
  30.  14
    The Edinburgh-2 Coma Scale: A New Scale for Assessing Impaired Consciousness.K. Sugiura, K. Muraoka, T. Chishiki & M. Baba - 1983 - Neurosurgery 12:411-15.
  31.  3
    The Pope on the Moral Obligation to Continue Tube Feeding for Patients in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness.Norman Ford - 2004 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 9 (4):1.
  32. The Ethics of Care for Those with Post-Coma Unresponsiveness and Related Conditions.A. O. P. Fisher - 2005 - Bioethics Outlook 16 (2).
     
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  33. Coma, Death and Moral Dues: A Response to Serafini.Grant Gillett - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (4):375-377.
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  34. Differences in Brain Metabolism Between Patients in Coma, Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State and Locked-in Syndrome.Steven Laureys, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & M. Ferring - 2003 - European Journal of Neurology 10.
  35. El retorno de Mnemosyne o la filosofía coma aplicación.Je Ortega - 1997 - Ciencia Tomista 124 (2):347-362.
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  36. Assessment of Level of Consciousness Following Severe Neurological Insult: A Comparison of the Psychometric Qualities of the Glasgow Coma Scale and the Comprehensive Level of Consciousness Scale.D. E. Stanczak, J. G. White & W. D. Gouview - 1984 - Journal of Neurosurgery 60:955-60.
  37. Clinical Recovery of Consciousness After Traumatic Coma.Segnarbieux F. van de Kelft E., Couchet P. Candon E. & Daures J. P. Frerebeau P. - 1994 - Critical Care Medicine 22:1108-13.
     
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  38.  5
    Brain based criteria for death in the light of the Aristotelian-Scholastic anthropology.Jacek Maria Norkowski - 2018 - Scientia et Fides 6 (1):153-188.
    In 1968 the authors of the so-called Harvard Report, proposed the recognition of an irreversible coma as a new criterion for death. The proposal was accepted by the medical, legal, religious and political circles in spite of the lack of any explanation why the irreversible coma combined with the absence of brainstem reflexes, including the respiratory reflex might be equated to death. Such an explanation was formulated in the President’s Commission Report published in 1981. This document stated, that (...)
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  39.  10
    The Distribution of Consciousness: A Difficult Cartesian Chart.Marcello Massimini - 2016 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 7 (1):3-15.
    : If we were asked to draw a graph to represent the distribution of consciousness in the world around us based on objective criteria, we would definitely be in trouble. The two objective parameters that have been traditionally considered as a guide – the complexity of behavior and brain size – lead to paradoxical conclusions and turn out to be unsatisfactory, to say the least. We need to find novel, reliable metrics. However, these can be identified, validated and calibrated only (...)
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  40.  48
    The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria.Joseph T. Giacino & Childs N. Ashwal S. - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):349-353.
  41. Auditory Processing in Severely Brain Injured Patients: Differences Between the Minimally Conscious State and the Persistent Vegetative State.Melanie Boly, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & Philippe Peigneux - 2004 - Archives of Neurology 61 (2):233-238.
  42.  76
    Perspectives and Experience of Healthcare Professionals on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and End-of-Life Decision Making in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Catherine Rodrigue, Richard J. Riopelle, James L. Bernat & Eric Racine - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):25-36.
    In the care of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), some ethical difficulties stem from the challenges of accurate diagnosis and the uncertainty of prognosis. Current neuroimaging research on these disorders could eventually improve the accuracy of diagnoses and prognoses and therefore change the context of end-of-life decision making. However, the perspective of healthcare professionals on these disorders remains poorly understood and may constitute an obstacle to the integration of research. We conducted a qualitative study involving healthcare professionals from an (...)
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  43. Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State.Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard - 2007 - Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.
  44. Ethical Considerations in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research in Acutely Comatose Patients.Charles Weijer, Tommaso Bruni, Teneille Gofton, G. Bryan Young, Loretta Norton, Andrew Peterson & Adrian M. Owen - 2015 - Brain:0-0.
    After severe brain injury, one of the key challenges for medical doctors is to determine the patient’s prognosis. Who will do well? Who will not do well? Physicians need to know this, and families need to do this too, to address choices regarding the continuation of life supporting therapies. However, current prognostication methods are insufficient to provide a reliable prognosis. -/- Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) holds considerable promise for improving the accuracy of prognosis in acute brain injury patients. Nonetheless, (...)
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  45.  26
    Revival der Hirntod-Debatte: Funktionelle Bildgebung für die Hirntod-Diagnostik. [REVIEW]Sabine Müller - 2010 - Ethik in der Medizin 22 (1):5-17.
    Zum Hirntod werden zwei Fragen erneut kontrovers diskutiert: erstens, ob der Hirntod mit dem Tod gleichzusetzen ist, zweitens, wie man den Hirntod sicher diagnostiziert. Neue empirische Erkenntnisse erfordern eine neue Auseinandersetzung mit diesen Fragen: Erstens haben zahlreiche Studien ein längeres Überleben und die Integration von Körperfunktionen von hirntoten Patienten nachgewiesen. Der President's Council on Bioethics hat im Dezember 2008 eingestanden, dass die bisher vertretene Begründung für das Hirntodkriterium, nämlich die Annahme des engen zeitlichen und kausalen Zusammenhangs des Hirntodes und der (...)
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  46. Should We Fear Quantum Torment?István Aranyosi - 2012 - Ratio 25 (3):249-259.
    The prospect, in terms of subjective expectations, of immortality under the no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is certain, as pointed out by several authors, both physicists and, more recently, philosophers. The argument, known as quantum suicide, or quantum immortality, has received some critical discussion, but there hasn't been any questioning of David Lewis's point that there is a terrifying corollary to the argument, namely, that we should expect to live forever in a crippled, more and more damaged state, that barely (...)
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  47.  4
    Are the Irreversibly Comatose Still Here? The Destruction of Brains and the Persistence of Persons.Lukas J. Meier - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105618.
    When an individual is comatose while parts of her brain remain functional, the question arises as to whether any mental characteristics are still associated with this brain, that is, whether the person still exists. Settling this uncertainty requires that one becomes clear about two issues: the type of functional loss that is associated with the respective profile of brain damage and the persistence conditions of persons. Medical case studies can answer the former question, but they are not concerned with the (...)
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  48. The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life.Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) - 2006 - Prometheus Books.
  49. The Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States: Current Knowledge and Remaining Questions.Joseph T. Giacino & J. T. Whyte - 2005 - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.
  50.  47
    Incidence and Prevalence of the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.J. Graham Beaumont & Pamela M. Kenealy - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 15 (3):184-189.
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