Results for 'comic immoralism'

653 found
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  1.  21
    Moderate Comic Immoralism and the Genetic Approach to the Ethical Criticism of Art.Ted Nannicelli - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):169-179.
    According to comic moralism, moral flaws make comic works less funny or not funny at all. In contrast, comic immoralism is the view that moral flaws make comic works funnier. In this article, I argue for a moderate version of comic immoralism. I claim that, sometimes, comic works are funny partly in virtue of their moral flaws. I argue for this claim—and artistic immoralism more generally—by identifying artistically valuable moral flaws in (...)
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  2.  35
    Comic Immoralism and Relatively Funny Jokes.Scott Woodcock - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (2):203-216.
    A widely accepted view in the philosophy of humour is that immoral jokes, like racist, sexist or homophobic jokes, can nevertheless be funny. What remains controversial is whether the moral flaws in these jokes can sometimes increase their humour. Moderate comic immoralism claims that it is possible, in at least some cases, for moral flaws to increase the humour of jokes. Critics of moderate comic immoralism deny that this ever occurs. They recognise that some jokes are (...)
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  3.  98
    In Defense of Comic Pluralism.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):375-392.
    Jokes are sometimes morally objectionable, and sometimes they are not. What’s the relationship between a joke’s being morally objectionable and its being funny? Philosophers’ answers to this question run the gamut. In this paper I present a new argument for the view that the negative moral value of a joke can affect its comedic value both positively and negatively.
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  4.  77
    Ethics and Comic Amusement.Noël Carroll - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):241-253.
    This article explores several views on the relation of humour, especially tendentious humour, to morality, including comic amoralism, comic ethicism, comic immoralism, and moderate comic moralism. The essay concludes by defending moderate comic moralism.
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  5.  97
    It’s Not (Only) The Joke’s Fault: A Speech Act Approach To Offensive Humor.Daniel Koch - 2015 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch:318-338.
    Usually the ethics of humor revolves around the content of humor. After giving a synopsis and exposing some shortcomings of the recent controversies, this paper takes into account additional aspects and proposes a change of perspective from token to type level and deploys tools of the philosophy of language to tackle the question whether a joke as a type can be considered morally flawed irrespective of its tokens. After exploring possible ways one can think of to furnish evidence for the (...)
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  6. Do Moral Flaws Enhance Amusement?Aaron Smuts - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):151-163.
    I argue that genuine moral flaws never enhance amusement, but they sometimes detract.I argue against comic immoralism--the position that moral flaws can make attempts at humor more amusing.Two common errors have made immoralism look attractive.First, immoralists have confused outrageous content with genuine moral flaws.Second, immoralists have failed to see that it is not sufficient to show that a morally flawed joke is amusing; they need to show that a joke can be more amusing because of the fact (...)
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  7. Going to Bed White and Waking Up Arab: On Xenophobia, Affect Theories of Laughter, and the Social Contagion of the Comic Stage.Cynthia Willett - 2014 - Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1):84-105.
    Like lynching and other mass hysterias, xenophobia exemplifies a contagious, collective wave of energy and hedonic quality that can point toward a troubling unpredictability at the core of political and social systems. While earlier studies of mass hysteria and popular discourse assume that cooler heads (aka rational individuals with their logic) could and should regain control over those emotions that are deemed irrational, and that boundaries are assumed healthy only when intact, affect studies pose individuals as nodes of biosocial networks (...)
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  8. Forbidden Knowledge: The Challenge of Immoralism.Matthew Kieran - 2003 - In Jose Luis Bermudez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.), Art and Morality. Routledge.
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  9. Living on (Happily) Ever After: Derrida, Philosophy and the Comic.Robert S. Gall - 1994 - Philosophy Today 38 (2):167-180.
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  10. The Development of Comic Theory in Germany During the Eighteenth Century.Paul Mallory Haberland - 1971 - Göppingen, A. Kümmerle.
     
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  11. The Absolute Comic.Edith Kern - 1980 - Columbia University Press.
     
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  12. The Triumph of Wit: A Study of Victorian Comic Theory.Robert Bernard Martin - 1974 - Clarendon Press.
     
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  13. Comic Laughter.Marie Taylor Swabey - 1961 - Archon Books.
     
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  14. Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor.John Morreall - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor develops an inclusive theory that integrates psychological, aesthetic, and ethical issues relating to humor Offers an enlightening and accessible foray into the serious business of humor Reveals how standard theories of humor fail to explain its true nature and actually support traditional prejudices against humor as being antisocial, irrational, and foolish Argues that humor’s benefits overlap significantly with those of philosophy Includes a foreword by Robert Mankoff, Cartoon Editor of The New Yorker.
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  15.  41
    X-Men Ethics: Using Comic Books to Teach Business Ethics.Virginia W. Gerde & R. Spencer Foster - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):245-258.
    A modern form of narrative, comic books are used to communicate, discuss, and critique issues in business ethics and social issues in management. A description of comic books as a legitimate medium is followed by a discussion of the pedagogical uses of comic books and assessment techniques. The strengths of the pedagogy include crossing cultural barriers, understanding the complexity of individual decision-making and organizational influences, and the universality of dilemmas and values. We provide an initial source for (...)
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  16. Immoralism and the Valence Constraint.James Harold - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):45-64.
    Immoralists hold that in at least some cases, moral fl aws in artworks can increase their aesthetic value. They deny what I call the valence constraint: the view that any effect that an artwork’s moral value has on its aesthetic merit must have the same valence. The immoralist offers three arguments against the valence constraint. In this paper I argue that these arguments fail, and that this failure reveals something deep and interesting about the relationship between cognitive and moral value. (...)
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  17.  13
    You 'Re a Good Structure, Charlie Brown: The Distribution of Narrative Categories in Comic Strips'.Neil Cohn - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (7):1317-1359.
    Cohn's (2013) theory of “Visual Narrative Grammar” argues that sequential images take on categorical roles in a narrative structure, which organizes them into hierarchic constituents analogous to the organization of syntactic categories in sentences. This theory proposes that narrative categories, like syntactic categories, can be identified through diagnostic tests that reveal tendencies for their distribution throughout a sequence. This paper describes four experiments testing these diagnostics to provide support for the validity of these narrative categories. In Experiment 1, participants reconstructed (...)
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  18. The Immortal Comedy: The Comic Phenomenon in Art, Literature, and Life.Agnes Heller - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    This book is the first attempt to think philosophically about the comic phenomenon in literature, art, and life. Working across a substantial collection of comic works author Agnes Heller makes seminal observations on the comic in the work of both classical and contemporary figures. Whether she's discussing Shakespeare, Kafka, Rabelais, or the paintings of Brueghel and Daumier Heller's Immortal Comedy makes a characteristic contribution to modern thought across the humanities.
     
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  19.  2
    Irony in the Age of Empire: Comic Perspectives on Democracy and Freedom.Cynthia Willett - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Comedy, from social ridicule to the unruly laughter of the carnival, provides effective tools for reinforcing social patterns of domination as well as weapons for emancipation. In Irony in the Age of Empire, Cynthia Willett asks: What could embody liberation better than laughter? Why do the oppressed laugh? What vision does the comic world prescribe? For Willett, the comic trumps standard liberal accounts of freedom by drawing attention to bodies, affects, and intimate relationships, topics which are usually neglected (...)
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  20. The Salacious and the Satirical: In Defense of Symmetric Comic Moralism. Smuts - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):45-62.
    A common view holds that humor and morality are antithetical: Moral flaws enhance amusement, and moral virtues detract. I reject both of these claims. If we distinguish between merely outrageous jokes and immoral jokes, the problems with the common view become apparent. What we find is that genuine morals flaws tend to inhibit amusement. Further, by looking at satire, we can see that moral virtues sometimes enhance amusement. The position I defend is called symmetric comic moralism. It is widely (...)
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  21.  71
    Immoralism and the Anti-Theoretical View.Robert Stecker - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):145-161.
    Can a moral defect be an artistic virtue? Can it make a positive contribution to artistic value? Further, if this can happen on occasion, does this imply that moral value has no systematic connection to artistic value since every conceivable relation between them is possible? The idea that moral defects can sometimes be artistic virtues has received a fair number of defenders recently and so has the anti-theoretical view that there is no systematic relation between artistic and moral value. But (...)
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  22.  34
    Mill in Parliament: The View From the Comic Papers.John M. Robson - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):102.
    So, on 22 July 1865, under the title ‘Philosophy and Punch’, did England's premier comic weekly greet the election of J. S. Mill as MP for Westminster. Mill held his seat for only one term, until the general election of 1868, when his Whig-Liberal colleague Robert Wellesley Grosvenor was re-elected, but Mill was replaced by the loser in 1865, the Conservative W. H. Smith, Jr., who, though he never went to sea, became the ruler of the Queen's navy. The (...)
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  23.  71
    “How to Be an Immoralist”.Robert Guay - manuscript
    Nietzsche occasionally referred to his substantive ethical position as “immoralism,”1 but gave only a vague impression of just what this position amounts to. The strategy of this paper will be to determine how to be an immoralist by identifying what is affirmed in Nietzsche’s negation of morality. That is, I wish to consider aspects of the critique of morality not to show that morality is wrong – that is not my goal here – but to identify what Nietzsche’s substantive (...)
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  24.  20
    Technology is a Laughing Matter: Bergson, the Comic and Technology.Steffen Steinert - 2017 - AI and Society 32 (2):201-208.
    There seems to be no connection between philosophy of humor and the philosophy of technology. In this paper, I want to make the case that there is. I will pursue a twofold goal in this paper: First, I will take an account from one of the seminal figures in the philosophy of humor, Henri Bergson, and bring out its merits for a philosophy of technology. Bergson has never been fully appreciated as a philosopher of technology. I will fill this gap (...)
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  25.  5
    Mill in Parliament: The View From the Comic Papers: John M. Robson.John M. Robson - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):102-143.
    So, on 22 July 1865, under the title ‘Philosophy and Punch’, did England's premier comic weekly greet the election of J. S. Mill as MP for Westminster. Mill held his seat for only one term, until the general election of 1868, when his Whig-Liberal colleague Robert Wellesley Grosvenor was re-elected, but Mill was replaced by the loser in 1865, the Conservative W. H. Smith, Jr., who, though he never went to sea, became the ruler of the Queen's navy. The (...)
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  26.  4
    Seeing Law: The Comic and Icon as Law.Kieran Tranter - forthcoming - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-4.
    This special issue examines how the comic and the icon prefigure forms of legality that are different to modern law. There is a primal seeing of law unmediated by reading, writing or possibly thinking. This introduction identifies the primacy of the eye, the emergence of visual jurisprudence and the transformations of law as a paper-based material practice to a digitally enabled activity.
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  27.  53
    Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor. [REVIEW]John Marmysz - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):305-308.
    A review of John Morrreall's book Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor.
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  28.  4
    Agitation with—and of—Burke's Comic Theory. Adams - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):315-335.
    “Ambivalence” is the key word in much of this book; “comic” [is the book’s] most obscure and I think absolutely without use value. I don’t know what B[urke] means by “comic,” as a matter of fact. I wonder if he does, and could define it briefly. Readers of Kenneth Burke are well aware of the importance of comedy and its associated cluster of concepts in his work: comic, comic frame, comic attitude, comic corrective. This (...)
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  29.  21
    Comic and Tragic Interlocutors and Socratic Method.Janet McCracken - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (4):361-375.
    Teaching is often framed in terms of performance: an orator stands before a crowd, attempting to capture attention and to deliver material prepared in advance. This analogy falls apart, however, when one considers the extent to which teaching is a dialogical endeavor. Looking to the Meno, the Symposium, and the Republic, this paper offers an interpretation of these texts which deepens our understanding of Plato’s theory of education. First, a Platonic view of education recommends a view of educators not as (...)
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  30.  23
    The Comic Vision of Life.John Morreall - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):125-140.
    Tragedy has traditionally been ranked higher than comedy, and critics often valorize the ‘tragic vision of life’. Using twenty contrasts between tragedy and comedy, I argue that there is a ‘comic vision of life’ which is superior to the tragic vision, especially in the post-heroic era in which we live.
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  31.  11
    Kleon's Eyebrows (Cratin. Fr. 228 K-A) and Late 5th-Century Comic Portrait-Masks.S. Douglas Olson - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (01):320-321.
    At Aristophanes, Equites 230–2, one of the slaves who speak the prologue informs the audience that, when the Paphlagonian appears onstage, his mask will not resemble him, for the σκεoπoιoí were afraid to make one that depicted him accurately. In an important article, K. J. Dover argued that it must in fact have been very difficult to create easily recognizable portrait-masks, and suggested that the joke in Eq. 230–2 may be that the Paphlagonian's mask is horribly ugly but allegedly still (...)
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  32.  7
    Danto's Comic Vision: Philosophical Method and Literary Style.Noel Carroll - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):554-563.
    Arthur Danto numbers among the few contemporary philosophers whose writing is really a pleasure to read. Although rarely recognized, the source of that pleasure is Danto’s humor. His philosophical writing is consistently comic. Of course, the humor is obviously not of the knee-slapping variety. Yet it is pervasively playful.Danto will introduce a thought experiment and then explore it in several directions. Unlike many other contemporary philosophers, he is not stingy in laying out his examples. Whereas it is customary for (...)
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  33.  3
    ‘Fear’ and ‘Hope’ in Graphic Fiction: The Schismatic Role of Law in an Australian Dystopian Comic.Sharp Cassandra - 2017 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 30 (3):407-426.
    The rise in popularity in recent times of dystopian fiction is reflective of contemporary anxieties about law: the inhumanity of judicial-coercive machinery; the influence of corporate power; the lack of democratic imagination despite the desperate need for political reform; and the threat of order imposed through violence and victimisation. These dystopian texts often tell fear-inducing stories of law’s failure to protect; or of law’s unsuccessful struggle against unbridled power; or even sometimes of law’s ‘bastardised’ reconstruction. Indeed comics, with their visual (...)
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  34.  9
    The Comic Character of Confucius.Katrin Froese - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (4):295-312.
    This article examines the comic portrayal of Confucius in the Analects and the Zhuangzi, maintaining that there is a humorous aspect to the character of Confucius that is often overlooked. Conventional interpretations of the Analects downplay the pranks and mocking comments that are sprinkled throughout them. Many of the humorous words Confucius utters are directed at ritualistic behaviour which has become mechanistic, suggesting that in order to take ritual seriously, we must also be prepared to take it in jest. (...)
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  35.  4
    The Comic Poet Pherecrates, a War-Casualty of the Late 410s BC.S. Douglas Olson - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:49-50.
    The comic poet Pherecrates does not appear to have been active after the mid 410s. I suggest that he is to be identified with an epigraphically-attested war-casualty from a few years later.
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  36.  1
    Seeing Law: The Comic, Icon and the Image in Law and Justice.Kieran Tranter - 2017 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 30 (3):363-366.
    This special issue examines how the comic and the icon prefigure forms of legality that are different to modern law. There is a primal seeing of law unmediated by reading, writing or possibly thinking. This introduction identifies the primacy of the eye, the emergence of visual jurisprudence and the transformations of law as a paper-based material practice to a digitally enabled activity.
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  37.  3
    Comic Technique and the Fourth Actor.C. W. Marshall - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):77-.
    A recent article on ‘The Number of Speaking Actors in Old Comedy’ by D. M. MacDowell has argued that to perform the plays of Aristophanes required the use of four, but never five, speaking actors.1 Systematically argued, MacDowell presents a cogent case against Henderson , who has suggested that at times five actors were permitted. MacDowell also presents some very sensible observations on the nature of any prescription which might limit the number of actors. The final paragraphs, however, express considerable (...)
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  38.  7
    The Comic Fragments in Their Relation to the Structure of Old Attic Comedy.M. Whittaker - 1935 - Classical Quarterly 29 (3-4):181-.
    Aristophanic Comedy falls structurally into marked divisions, episodic and epirrhematic. The first is a very simple method of composition consisting of short iambic scenes, connected by choral stasima which are more or less relevant to the action. As a general rule these episodes occupy the second half of the play between the Parabasis and Exodos, and, since they show the hero enjoying the fruits of his earlier struggles, contribute little to the development of the plot. Many of the Comic (...)
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  39.  4
    The Concept of the Comic in Esthetics.T. B. Liubimova - 1980 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 19 (3):70-94.
    The comic is one of the principal esthetic categories; it unites the multifaceted experience of the social mind as it assimilates and cognizes the world, particularly the social world, on the basis of axioms of common sense, or even of public opinion about these axioms. Boldly violating the laws of logic and the verisimilitude of images, of normal connections and notions, and playing upon these violations, the comic nonetheless remains firmly on the side of common sense. The (...) is inexhaustible in its nuances — from light merriment and entertainment to malicious ridicule and satire, from gross farce to subtle forms of irony and humor. (shrink)
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  40.  2
    A Total Write-Off. Aristophanes, Cratinus, and the Rhetoric of Comic Competition.I. Comic Intertextualities - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52:138-163.
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  41.  2
    The Comic Costume Controversy.J. F. Killeen - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (01):51-.
    As to the wearing of a leather phallus by fifth-century comic actors, Pickard- Cambridge wrote: ‘Aristophanes’ resolution to avoid such indecencies does not seem to have lasted long.’ One year would not have beenlong; and Beare, who resumed Thiele's position, and Webster, who supported that of Körte, carried on a controversy on the matter without reference to what I believe is a relevant, if misunderstood, text.
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  42.  2
    Americanized Comic Braggarts.Walter Blair - 1977 - Critical Inquiry 4 (2):331-349.
    During nearly two centuries, American storytellers have celebrated comic figures, ebullient showoffs who turned up on one frontier after another—in the old South, in Kentucky and Tennessee, along the great inland rivers, in the mountains and the mines and on the prairies. Often, the stories went, when these characters engaged in a favorite pastime—playfully bragging about their strength, their skill and their exploits—they used animal metaphors such as Opossum, Screamer, Half-Horse Half-Alligator, the Big Bear of Arkansas or Gamecock of (...)
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  43.  1
    The Later Comic Chorus.K. J. Maidment - 1935 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):1-.
    The history of Attic comedy after the fifth century is not simple. The comic fragments are obscure, because they are fragments: and the ancient interpreters, because they are determined to interpret. But the subject still remains interesting and important, especially in so far as it is concerned with Middle Comedy, which filled the gap between Aristophanes and Menander. Formally and materially, Menander was a modern, while Aristophanes was not: and it was during the fourth century that the ground was (...)
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  44. El cómic en España: 1977-2007.Pablo Vergara Díaz - 2009 - Aposta 42:3.
    This article aims to review the last three decades of the comic Spain. The study is evaluating the evolution of the comics industry, from its beginnings during the dictatorship and its expansion with the advent of democracy until the present times of difficulties and changes. The rise of the comic can be seen in its growing importance within the press, the acceptance of a public that matures over time and especially in the sales of an industry that has (...)
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  45. An Inconsistent Ado About Matters of No Consequence': Comic Turns in Plato's "Euthydemus.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):15-32.
    Scholarship on the Euthydemus has largely focused on the protreptic character of the Euthydemus—that is, the manner by which Socrates attempts to turn the young Cleinias toward philosophy. By focusing on the dramatic structure of the text, and above all its comic tenor, this article argues that it is Crito—he to whom Socrates tells his hilarious story of his encounter with the two sophist-brothers—who is the real object of Socrates’s protreptic speech.
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  46. Laughing Otherwise: Comic-Critical Approaches in Alternative Comedy.Krista Bonello Rutter Giappone - 2017 - Journal for Cultural Research 21 (4):394-413.
    The origins of ‘alternative comedy’ are difficult to pinpoint, though it coincided with the rise of Thatcher as Prime Minister in 1979 – that year saw the appearance of something called ‘alternative cabaret’, a term usually associated with Tony Allen, who combined activism and comedy. The acts this article will focus on are those which took a critical approach to comedy and/or politics – ‘alternative’ comedy, therefore, as seeming to promise change through critical awareness. This paper will discuss parody as (...)
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  47. What's So Funny? Comic Content in Depiction.Patrick Maynard - 2012 - In Cook Meskin (ed.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper addresses standard questions regarding comics and the arts (comics and fine arts, image and word combinations), then poses and addresses the neglected, but deeper and wider--thus philosophical--question, of how depictions, not just words, can have mental contents at all, including light, funny, scathing, comic ones.
     
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  48. From Wodehouse to the White House: A Corpus-Assisted Study of Play, Fantasy and Dramatic Incongruity in Comic Writing and Laughter-Talk.Alan Partington - 2008 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 4 (2):189-213.
    From Wodehouse to the White House: A Corpus-Assisted Study of Play, Fantasy and Dramatic Incongruity in Comic Writing and Laughter-Talk In this paper I consider two discourse types, one written and literary, the other spoken and semi-conversational, in an attempt to discover if there are any similarities in the ways in which humour is generated in such apparently diverse forms of communication. The first part of the paper is concerned with the explicitly comic prose of P. G. Wodehouse, (...)
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  49. Kierkegaard and the Legitimacy of the Comic: Understanding the Relevance of Irony, Humor, and the Comic for Ethics and Religion.Will Williams - 2018 - Lexington Books.
    Kierkegaard makes a controversial and little-understood claim: irony, humor, and the comic are essential to ethics and religion. This account, grounded in Concluding Unscientific Postscript, explicates that idea for a philosophical and theological audience with a level of conceptual analysis never seen before in Kierkegaard scholarship.
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  50.  6
    Broadening Humor: Comic Styles Differentially Tap Into Temperament, Character, and Ability.Willibald Ruch, Sonja Heintz, Tracey Platt, Lisa Wagner & René T. Proyer - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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