Results for 'competence'

997 found
Order:
See also
  1. Know-How as Competence. A Rylean Responsibilist Account.David Löwenstein - 2017 - Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann.
    What does it mean to know how to do something? This book develops a comprehensive account of know-how, a crucial epistemic goal for all who care about getting things right, not only with respect to the facts, but also with respect to practice. It proposes a novel interpretation of the seminal work of Gilbert Ryle, according to which know-how is a competence, a complex ability to do well in an activity in virtue of guidance by an understanding of what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  2. Competence to Know.Lisa Miracchi - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (1):29-56.
    I argue against traditional virtue epistemology on which knowledge is a success due to a competence to believe truly, by revealing an in-principle problem with the traditional virtue epistemologist’s explanation of Gettier cases. The argument eliminates one of the last plausible explanation of Gettier cases, and so of knowledge, in terms of non-factive mental states and non-mental conditions. I then I develop and defend a different kind of virtue epistemology, on which knowledge is an exercise of a competence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  3. Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence.Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.
    Deep brain stimulation is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and treatment refractory (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  4.  22
    Why is It Hard to Make Progress in Assessing Children’s Decision-Making Competence?Irma M. Hein, Pieter W. Troost, Alice Broersma, Martine C. De Vries, Joost G. Daams & Ramón J. L. Lindauer - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1.
    For decades, the discussion on children’s competence to consent to medical issues has concentrated around normative concerns, with little progress in clinical practices. Decision-making competence is an important condition in the informed consent model. In pediatrics, clinicians need to strike a proper balance in order to both protect children’s interests when they are not fully able to do so themselves and to respect their autonomy when they are. Children’s competence to consent, however, is currently not assessed in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  5.  70
    Précis Zu Know-How as Competence. A Rylean Responsibilist Account.David Löwenstein - 2018 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 72 (1):95-99.
    This is a précis of my book "Know-how as Competence. A Rylean Responsibilist Account".
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. The Driver of Green Innovation and Green Image – Green Core Competence.Yu-Shan Chen - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):531-543.
    This study proposed a novel construct – green core competence – to explore its positive effects on green innovation and green images of firms. The results showed that green core competences of firms were positively correlated to their green innovation performance and green images. In addition, this research also verified two types of green innovation performance had partial mediation effects between green core competences and green images of firms. Therefore, investment in the development of green core competence was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  7.  61
    Informed Consent Instead of Assent is Appropriate in Children From the Age of Twelve: Policy Implications of New Findings on Children’s Competence to Consent to Clinical Research.Irma M. Hein, Martine C. De Vries, Pieter W. Troost, Gerben Meynen, Johannes B. Van Goudoever & Ramón J. L. Lindauer - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundFor many decades, the debate on children’s competence to give informed consent in medical settings concentrated on ethical and legal aspects, with little empirical underpinnings. Recently, data from empirical research became available to advance the discussion. It was shown that children’s competence to consent to clinical research could be accurately assessed by the modified MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research. Age limits for children to be deemed competent to decide on research participation have been studied: generally (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8.  25
    Evidence – Competence – Discourse: The Theoretical Framework of the Multi-Centre Clinical Ethics Support Project Metap.Stella Reiter-Theil, Marcel Mertz, Jan Schürmann, Nicola Stingelin Giles & Barbara Meyer-Zehnder - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (7):403-412.
    In this paper we assume that ‘theory’ is important for Clinical Ethics Support Services (CESS). We will argue that the underlying implicit theory should be reflected. Moreover, we suggest that the theoretical components on which any clinical ethics support (CES) relies should be explicitly articulated in order to enhance the quality of CES.A theoretical framework appropriate for CES will be necessarily complex and should include ethical (both descriptive and normative), metaethical and organizational components. The various forms of CES that exist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  9.  60
    The Impact of Business Education on Moral Judgment Competence: An Empirical Study.David E. Desplaces, David E. Melchar, Laura L. Beauvais & Susan M. Bosco - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):73-87.
    This study uses theories of moral reasoning and moral competence to investigate how university codes of ethics, perceptions of ethical culture, academic pressure from significant others, and ethics pedagogy are related to the moral development of students. Results suggest that ethical codes and student perceptions of such codes affect their perceptions of the ethical nature of the cultures within these institutions. In addition, faculty and student discussion of ethics in business courses is significantly and positively related to moral (...) among students. Our results point to the need to further examine the connections among academic institutional structures, ethics pedagogy, and students’ moral development. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  10. Competence, Practical Rationality and What a Patient Values.Jillian Craigie - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (6):326-333.
    According to the principle of patient autonomy, patients have the right to be self-determining in decisions about their own medical care, which includes the right to refuse treatment. However, a treatment refusal may legitimately be overridden in cases where the decision is judged to be incompetent. It has recently been proposed that in assessments of competence, attention should be paid to the evaluative judgments that guide patients' treatment decisions.In this paper I examine this claim in light of theories of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  11.  81
    Depression, Possibilities, and Competence: A Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW]Gerben Meynen - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):181-193.
    Competent decision-making is required for informed consent. In this paper, I aim, from a phenomenological perspective, to identify the specific facets of competent decision-making that may form a challenge to depressed patients. On a phenomenological account, mood and emotions are crucial to the way in which human beings encounter the world. More precisely, mood is intimately related to the options and future possibilities we perceive in the world around us. I examine how possibilities should be understood in this context, and (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  12. Leaders' Moral Competence and Employee Outcomes: The Effects of Psychological Empowerment and Person–Supervisor Fit. [REVIEW]Tae-Yeol Kim & Minsoo Kim - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):155-166.
    This study examined how leaders’ moral competence is linked to employees’ task performance and organizational citizenship behaviors. Based on a sample of 102 employee–supervisor pairs from seven organizations in South Korea, the results of this study revealed that leaders’ moral competence was positively associated with employees’ task performance and organizational citizenship behaviors toward leaders (OCBS). As expected, employees’ psychological empowerment partially mediated the relationship between leaders’ moral competence and employees’ task performance and OCBS. Furthermore, person–supervisor fit (PS (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  31
    Being, Doing, and Knowing: Developing Ethical Competence in Health Care. [REVIEW]S. Eriksson, G. Helgesson & A. T. Höglund - 2007 - Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):207-216.
    There is a growing interest in ethical competence-building within nursing and health care practising. This tendency is accompanied by a remarkable growth of ethical guidelines. Ethical demands have also been laid down in laws. Present-day practitioners and researchers in health care are thereby left in a virtual cross-fire of various legislations, codes, and recommendations, all intended to guide behaviour. The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of ethical guidelines in the process of ethical competence-building within (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  14. Linguistic Competence and Expertise.Mark Addis - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):327-336.
    Questions about the relationship between linguistic competence and expertise will be examined in the paper. Harry Collins and others distinguish between ubiquitous and esoteric expertise. Collins places considerable weight on the argument that ordinary linguistic competence and related phenomena exhibit a high degree of expertise. His position and ones which share close affinities are methodologically problematic. These difficulties matter because there is continued and systematic disagreement over appropriate methodologies for the empirical study of expertise. Against Collins, it will (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15.  19
    Criteria for Patient Decision Making (in)Competence: A Review of and Commentary on Some Empirical Approaches. [REVIEW]Sander P. K. Welie - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):139-151.
    The principle of autonomy presupposes Patient Decision Making Competence (PDMC). For a few decades a considerable amount of empirical research has been done into PDMC. In this contribution that research is explored. After a short exposition on four qualities involved in PDMC, different approaches to assess PDMC are distinguished, namely a negative and a positive one. In the negative approach the focus is on identifying psychopathologic conditions that impair sound decision making; the positive one attempts to assess whether a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  16. Connectionism, Competence and Explanation.Andy Clark - 1990 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (June):195-222.
    A competence model describes the abstract structure of a solution to some problem. or class of problems, facing the would-be intelligent system. Competence models can be quite derailed, specifying far more than merely the function to be computed. But for all that, they are pitched at some level of abstraction from the details of any particular algorithm or processing strategy which may be said to realize the competence. Indeed, it is the point and virtue of such models (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  17. A Theory of Collective Competence: Challenging The Neo-Liberal Individualisation of Performance at Work.Nick Boreham - 2004 - British Journal of Educational Studies 52 (1):5-17.
    Contemporary work-related education and training policy represents occupational competence as the outcome of individual performance at work. This paper presents a critique of this neo-liberal assumption, arguing that in many cases competence should be regarded as an attribute of groups, teams and communities. It proposes a theory of collective competence in terms of (1) making collective sense of events in the workplace, (2) developing and using a collective knowledge base and (3) developing a sense of interdependency. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  43
    Tractable Competence.Marcello Frixione - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (3):379-397.
    In the study of cognitive processes, limitations on computational resources (computing time and memory space) are usually considered to be beyond the scope of a theory of competence, and to be exclusively relevant to the study of performance. Starting from considerations derived from the theory of computational complexity, in this paper I argue that there are good reasons for claiming that some aspects of resource limitations pertain to the domain of a theory of competence.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  19.  12
    Mistakes as Revealing and as Manifestations of Competence.Felipe Morales Carbonell - forthcoming - Synthese:1-20.
    The final chapter of Elgin’s defends the claim that some mistakes mark significant epistemic achievements. Here, I extend Elgin’s analysis of the informativeness of mistakes for epistemic policing. I also examine the type of theory of competence that Elgin’s view requires, and suggest some directions in which this can be taken.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Patient Autonomy, Assessment of Competence and Surrogate Decision‐Making: A Call for Reasonableness in Deciding for Others.Kristine Bærøe - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (2):87-95.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I address some of the shortcomings of established clinical ethics centring on personal autonomy and consent and what I label the Doctrine of Respecting Personal Autonomy in Healthcare. I discuss two implications of this doctrine: 1) the practice for treating patients who are considered to have borderline decision‐making competence and 2) the practice of surrogate decision‐making in general. I argue that none of these practices are currently aligned with respectful treatment of vulnerable individuals. Because of ‘structural (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  40
    Patient Decision Making Competence: Outlines of a Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW]Jos V. M. Welie & Sander P. K. Welie - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):127-138.
    In order to protect patients against medical paternalism, patients have been granted the right to respect of their autonomy. This right is operationalized first and foremost through the phenomenon of informed consent. If the patient withholds consent, medical treatment, including life-saving treatment, may not be provided. However, there is one proviso: The patient must be competent to realize his autonomy and reach a decision about his own care that reflects that autonomy. Since one of the most important patient rights hinges (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  22.  50
    Semantic Particularism and Linguistic Competence.Anna Bergqvist - 2009 - Logique Et Analyse 52 (208):343-361.
    In this paper I examine a contemporary debate about the general notion of linguistic rules and the place of context in determining meaning, which has arisen in the wake of a challenge that the conceptual framework of moral particularism has brought to the table. My aim is to show that particularism in the theory of meaning yields an attractive model of linguistic competence that stands as a genuine alternative to other use-oriented but still generalist accounts that allow room for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  4
    What is Epistemic Entitlement? Reliable Competence, Reasons, Inference, Access.Peter Graham - forthcoming - In Christopher Kelp & John Greco (eds.), Virtue-Theoretic Epistemology: New Methods and Approaches. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Tyler Burge first introduced his distinction between epistemic entitlement and epistemic justification in ‘Content Preservation’ in 1993. He has since deployed the distinction in over twenty papers, changing his formulation around 2009. His distinction and its basis, however, is not well understood in the literature. This chapter distinguishes two uses of ‘entitlement’ in Burge, and then focuses on his distinction between justification and entitlement, two forms of warrant, where warrants consists in the exercise of a reliable belief-forming competence. Since (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  23
    Ethical Dilemmas and Ethical Competence in the Daily Work of Research Nurses.A. T. Höglund, G. Helgesson & S. Eriksson - 2010 - Health Care Analysis 18 (3):239-251.
    In spite of the growing interest in nursing ethics, few studies have focused on ethical dilemmas experienced by nurses working with clinical studies as ‘research nurses’. The aim of the present study was to describe and explore ethical dilemmas that Swedish research nurses experience in their day-to-day work. In a qualitative study a purposeful sample of six research nurses from five wards of differing disciplines in four Swedish hospitals was interviewed. The analysis displayed several examples of ethical dilemmas, primarily tensions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  92
    Quality Assurance in Legal Translation: Evaluating Process, Competence and Product in the Pursuit of Adequacy.Fernando Prieto Ramos - 2015 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (1):11-30.
    Building on a functionalist framework for decision-making in legal translation, a holistic approach to quality is presented in order to respond to the specificities of this field and overcome the shortcomings of general models of translation quality evaluation. The proposed approach connects legal, contextual, macrotextual and microtextual variables for the definition of the translation adequacy strategy, which guides problem-solving and the rest of the translation process. The same parameters remain traceable between the translation brief and the translation product both in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  18
    Exploring the Similarities and Differences Between Medical Assessments of Competence and Criminal Responsibility.Gerben Meynen - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):443-451.
    The medical assessments of criminal responsibility and competence to consent to treatment are performed, developed and debated in distinct domains. In this paper I try to connect these domains by exploring the similarities and differences between both assessments. In my view, in both assessments a decision-making process is evaluated in relation to the possible influence of a mental disorder on this process. I will argue that, in spite of the relevance of the differences, both practices could benefit from the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  34
    The Conflation of Competence and Capacity in English Medical Law: A Philosophical Critique. [REVIEW]Philip Bielby - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):357-369.
    Ethical and legal discourse pertaining to the ability to consent to treatment and research in England operates within a dualist framework of “competence” and “capacity”. This is confusing, as while there exists in England two possible senses of legal capacity – “first person” legal capacity and “delegable” legal capacity, currently neither is formulated to bear a necessary relationship with decision-making competence. Notwithstanding this, judges and academic commentators frequently invoke competence to consent in discussions involving the validity of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28. Chomsky and Wittgenstein on Linguistic Competence.Thomas McNally & Sinéad McNally - 2012 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review.
    In his Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language , Saul Kripke presents his influential reading of Wittgenstein’s later writings on language. One of the largely unexplored features of that reading is that Kripke makes a small number of suggestive remarks concerning the possible threat that Wittgenstein’s arguments pose for Chomsky’s linguistic project. In this paper, we attempt to characterise the relevance of Wittgenstein’s later work on meaning and rule-following for transformational linguistics, and in particular to identify the potentially negative impact (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  14
    The Concept of Political Competence.Matthias Brinkmann - 2018 - Critical Review 30 (3-4):163-193.
    Two crucial distinctions regarding political competence must be made. First, the mere probability that you will make a morally right decision (reliability) is distinct from your ability to skillfully make a decision (competence). Empirical and normative accounts have focused primarily on reliability, but competence is more important if we take central normative commitments seriously. Second, the competence you have on your own (direct competence) is distinct from the competence you have in contributing to some (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  74
    Social Externalism and the Ontology of Competence.Andrew Davis - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations 8 (3):297-308.
    Social externalism implies that many competences are not personal assets separable from social and cultural environments but complex states of affairs involving individuals and persisting features of social reality. The paper explores the consequences for competence identity over time and across contexts, and hence for the predictive role usually accorded to competences.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  46
    The Promise and Paradox of Cultural Competence.Rebecca J. Hester - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (4):279-291.
    Cultural competence has become a ubiquitous and unquestioned aspect of professional formation in medicine. It has been linked to efforts to eliminate race-based health disparities and to train more compassionate and sensitive providers. In this article, I question whether the field of cultural competence lives up to its promise. I argue that it does not because it fails to grapple with the ways that race and racism work in U.S. society today. Unless we change our theoretical apparatus for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  8
    Applying “Place” to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training.Dianne Quigley - 2016 - Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):19-33.
    Research ethics principles and regulations typically have been applied to the protection of individual human subjects. Yet, new paradigms of research that include the place-based community and cultural groups as partners or participants of environmental research interventions, in particular, require attention to place-based identities and geographical contexts. This paper argues the importance of respecting “place” within human subjects protections applied to communities and cultural groups as part of a critical need for research ethics and cultural competence training for graduate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  68
    Considérations méthodologiques pour aborder la compétence à « réfléchir » ou à « faire réfléchir » sur sa pratique en enseignement.Philippe Chaubet, Enrique Correa Molina & Colette Gervais - 2013 - Revue Phronesis 2 (1):28-40.
    Résumé : L’article propose une démarche méthodologique permettant d’identifier la réflexion professionnelle chez des stagiaires en formation à l’enseignement. En effet, la capacité d’analyser sa pratique de façon réflexive est une composante d’une compétence professionnelle à développer selon le Ministère de l’Éducation du Québec. Une certaine forme de réflexion chez les étudiants est donc à acquérir et, du point de vue des tuteurs de stage, à faire acquérir. Quels sont les critères implicites que les enseignants associés des écoles ou les (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  92
    The Neuroscience of Decision Making and Our Standards for Assessing Competence to Consent.Steve Clarke - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):189-196.
    Rapid advances in neuroscience may enable us to identify the neural correlates of ordinary decision making. Such knowledge opens up the possibility of acquiring highly accurate information about people’s competence to consent to medical procedures and to participate in medical research. Currently we are unable to determine competence to consent with accuracy and we make a number of unrealistic practical assumptions to deal with our ignorance. Here I argue that if we are able to detect competence to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  11
    Competence in Mental Health Care: A Hermeneutic Perspective. [REVIEW]Lazare Benaroyo & Guy Widdershoven - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (4):295-306.
    In this paper we develop a hermeneutic approach to the concept of competence. Patient competence, according to a hermeneutic approach, is not primarily a matter of being able to reason, but of being able to interpret the world and respond to it. Capacity should then not be seen as theoretical, but as practical. From the perspective of practical rationality, competence and capacity are two sides of the same coin. If a person has the capacity to understand the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36. Changing Notions of Linguistic Competence in the History of Formal Semantics.Barbara H. Partee - 2018 - In Derek Ball & Brian Rabern (eds.), The Science of Meaning: Essays on the metatheory of natural language semantics. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 172-196.
    In the history of formal semantics, the successful joining of linguistic and philosophical work brought with it some difficult foundational questions concerning the nature of meaning and the nature of knowledge of language in the domain of semantics: questions in part about “what’s in the head” of a competent language-user. This paper, part of a project on the history of formal semantics, revisits the central issues of (Partee, 1979) in a historical context, as a clash between two traditions, Fregean and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  52
    Competence and Ability.Eric Vogelstein - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (5):235-244.
    It is nearly universally thought that the kind of decision-making competence that gives one a strong prima facie right to make one's own medical decisions essentially involves having an ability (or abilities) of some sort, or having a certain level or degree of ability (or abilities). When put under philosophical scrutiny, however, this kind of theory does not hold up. I will argue that being competent does not essentially involve abilities, and I will propose and defend a theory of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  44
    All That Jazz: Linguistic Competence and Improvisation.Niklas Möller - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 167 (2):237-250.
    Recently, theorists have pointed to the role of improvisation in practical reasoning and in gaining new moral knowledge. Laura and François Schroeter have gone even further by suggesting an account of competence with evaluative terms based on holistic improvisation. I argue, however, that they fail in their task. Through a challenge of their key claim against Allan Gibbard’s alternative account, I demonstrate that Schroeter and Schroeter provide only partial constraints on competence, and thus that their account lacks the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  26
    Patient Autonomy, Assessment of Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making: A Call for Reasonableness in Deciding for Others.Kristine Baerøe - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (2):87-95.
    In this paper, I address some of the shortcomings of established clinical ethics centring on personal autonomy and consent and what I label the Doctrine of Respecting Personal Autonomy in Healthcare. I discuss two implications of this doctrine: 1) the practice for treating patients who are considered to have borderline decision-making competence and 2) the practice of surrogate decision-making in general. I argue that none of these practices are currently aligned with respectful treatment of vulnerable individuals. Because of ‘structural (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. Belief and Death: Capital Punishment and the Competence-for-Execution Requirement.David M. Adams - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (1):17-30.
    A curious and comparatively neglected element of death penalty jurisprudence in America is my target in this paper. That element concerns the circumstances under which severely mentally disabled persons, incarcerated on death row, may have their sentences carried out. Those circumstances are expressed in a part of the law which turns out to be indefensible. This legal doctrine—competence-for-execution —holds that a condemned, death-row inmate may not be killed if, at the time of his scheduled execution, he lacks an awareness (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  28
    Care and Competence in Medical Practice: Francis Peabody Confronts Jason Posner. [REVIEW]James A. Marcum - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):143-153.
    In this paper, I discuss the role of care and competence, as well as their relationship to one another, in contemporary medical practice. I distinguish between two types of care. The first type, care1, represents a natural concern that motivates physicians to help or to act on the behalf of patients, i.e. to care about them. However, this care cannot guarantee the correct technical or right ethical action of physicians to meet the bodily and existential needs of patients, i.e. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  16
    Capacity and Competence in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.Jacinta O. A. Tan & Jorg M. Fegert - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (4):285-294.
    Capacity and competence in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry are complex issues, because of the many different influences that are involved in how children and adolescents make treatment decisions within the setting of mental health. This article will examine some of the influences which must be considered, namely: developmental aspects, the paradoxical relationship between the need for autonomy and participation and the capacity of children, family psychiatry, and the duty of care towards children and adolescents. The legal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  42
    Uncertainty Aversion Vs. Competence: An Experimental Market Study. [REVIEW]Carmela Di Mauro - 2008 - Theory and Decision 64 (2-3):301-331.
    Heath and Tversky (1991, Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 4:5–28) posed that reaction to ambiguity is driven by perceived competence. Competence effects may be inconsistent with ambiguity aversion if betting on own judgement is preferred to betting on a chance event, because judgemental probabilities are more ambiguous than chance events. This laboratory experiment analyses whether ambiguity affects prices and volumes in a double auction market, and contrasts ambiguity aversion to competence effects. In order to test for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  45
    Epistemological Skepticism, Semantic Blindness, and Competence-Based Performance Errors.Terry Horgan & Matjaž Potrč - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (2):161-177.
    The semantic blindness objection to contextualism challenges the view that there is no incompatibility between (i) denials of external-world knowledge in contexts where radical-deception scenarios are salient, and (ii) affirmations of external-world knowledge in contexts where such scenarios are not salient. Contextualism allegedly attributes a gross and implausible form of semantic incompetence in the use of the concept of knowledge to people who are otherwise quite competent in its use; this blindness supposedly consists in wrongly judging that there is genuine (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  29
    Addiction, Competence, and Coercion.Steve Matthews - 2014 - Journal of Philosophical Research 39:199-234.
    In what sense is a person addicted to drugs or alcohol incompetent, and so a legitimate object of coercive treatment? The standard tests for competence do not pick out the capacity that is lost in addiction: the capacity to properly regulate consumption. This paper is an attempt to sketch a justificatory framework for understanding the conditions under which addicted persons may be treated against their will. These conditions rarely obtain, for they apply only when addiction is extremely severe and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  47
    Multi-Disciplinary Competence Assessment: A Case Study in Consensus and Culture.Lorraine Y. Landry - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (5):423-437.
    The case of May Redwing, an American Indian woman assessed for competence is examined in detail. The case highlights the interconnections between the cultures of medicine and law and notes the importance of criteria of competence assessment, but also underscores the necessity of attention to the patient'scultural background in a multi-disciplinary competence assessment team process. Three interrelated areas of inquiry are explored: (1) Can we expect a morally and politically justifiable assessment of competence from a multi-disciplinary (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  3
    Which Are The Data That Competence Provides For Linguistic Intuitions?Dunja Jutronić - 2014 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 10 (2):119-143.
    There are two clearly opposed camps on the issue of the source of linguistic intuitions that have been labelled competentionalist and ordinarist positions. Competentionalists believe and defend the view that linguistic intuitions have a special status and that linguistic competence is their source, while ordinarists believe and defend the view that linguistic intuitions do not have any special status and that they are not directly derived from linguistic competence. The crucial disagreement is primarily over the source of intuitions. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  9
    La compétence : entre le savoir agir et l’agir réel. Perspective de l’énaction.Masciotra Domenico - 2017 - Éthique Publique. Revue Internationale D’Éthique Sociétale Et Gouvernementale 19 (1).
    Le cognitivisme localise les phénomènes mentaux dans le cerveau-esprit dans lequel fonctionne une compétence qui mobilise ou transfère d’une situation à l’autre les savoirs qui y sont emmagasinés. Dans cette perspective, une personne compétente se comprend par le cumul de savoirs et de compétences décontextualisés. Par contraste, la perspective de l’énaction localise les phénomènes mentaux dans l’entièreté de la personne en action et en situation, c’est-à-dire dans l’agir réel de la personne en contexte réel. La compétence se comprend alors comme (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  8
    La gestion des compétences : quelle place pour la compétence éthique dans les référentiels de compétences?Marie-Claude Boudreau - 2017 - Éthique Publique. Revue Internationale D’Éthique Sociétale Et Gouvernementale 19 (1).
    La gestion des compétences et son principal instrument, le référentiel de compétences, sont très répandus dans les grandes organisations canadiennes publiques et privées. La compétence éthique y est de plus en plus intégrée, sans toutefois qu’elle soit clairement définie. L’usage de ces référentiels pour « gérer » la compétence éthique des employés et des cadres pose également de nombreux enjeux pratiques et éthiques dont on doit prendre la mesure si l’on veut prétendre œuvrer à son développement. Ce texte vise à (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  13
    Moving Perspectives on Patient Competence: A Naturalistic Case Study in Psychiatry.A. M. Ruissen, T. A. Abma, A. J. L. M. Van Balkom, G. Meynen & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (1):71-85.
    Patient competence, defined as the ability to reason, appreciate, understand, and express a choice is rarely discussed in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, and coercive measures are seldom used. Nevertheless, a psychiatrist of psychologist may doubt whether OCD patients who refuse treatment understand their disease and the consequences of not being treated, which could result in tension between respecting the patient’s autonomy and beneficence. The purpose of this article is to develop a notion of competence that is grounded (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 997