Results for 'competing claims'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  97
    Fairness Between Competing Claims.Ben Saunders - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (1):41-55.
    Fairness is a central, but under-theorized, notion in moral and political philosophy. This paper makes two contributions. Firstly, it criticizes Broome’s seminal account of fairness in Proc Aristotelian Soc 91:87–101, showing that there are problems with restricting fairness to a matter of relative satisfaction and holding that it does not itself require the satisfaction of the claims in question. Secondly, it considers the justification of lotteries to resolve cases of ties between competing claims, which Broome claims (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  2. How Should We Aggregate Competing Claims?Alex Voorhoeve - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):64-87.
    Many believe that we ought to save a large number from being permanently bedridden rather than save one from death. Many also believe that we ought to save one from death rather than a multitude from a very minor harm, no matter how large this multitude. I argue that a principle I call “Aggregate Relevant Claims” satisfactorily explains these judgments. I offer a rationale for this principle and defend it against objections.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  3.  64
    Review of C. Gustafson and P. Juviler (Eds.) Religion and Human Rights: Competing Claims[REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 2000 - Teaching Philosophy 23 (4):384-387.
  4.  3
    Are Sciences Essential and Humanities Elective? Disentangling Competing Claims for Humanities' Research Public Value.J. Olmos-Penuela, P. Benneworth & E. Castro-Martinez - 2015 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 14 (1):61-78.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  32
    Population Aging and International Development: Addressing Competing Claims of Distributive Justice.Michal Engelman & Summer Johnson - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (1):8–18.
  6.  7
    Religion and Human Rights: Competing Claims[REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2000 - Teaching Philosophy 23 (4):384-387.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Six. Competing Claims and Priority Principles.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 256-314.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  7
    How Can We Believe Those Stories? A Nordic Perspective The Ethical Grounds of Competing Truth-Claims.Frank Bylov - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):232-240.
    This paper discusses the different, often competing, even conflicting, truth-claims that are heard around the personal narratives of marginalized, stigmatized and culturally muted people?in this case people with intellectual disabilities. Since people with intellectual disabilities began speaking up in the 1980s, tensions have emerged as to whose voice is authentic, whose story can be believed. This matters because we see the consequences of failure to believe those stories in scandals of abuse in settings, such as Winterbourne View (England) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Fairness and the Strengths of Agents' Claims.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (3):347-360.
    John Broome has proposed a theory of fairness according to which fairness requires that agents’ claims to goods be satisfied in proportion to the relative strength of those claims. In the case of competing claims for a single indivisible good, Broome argues that what fairness requires is the use of a weighted lottery as a surrogate to satisfying the competing claims: the relative chance of each claimant's winning the lottery should be set to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  28
    An Inclusive Approach to the Mediation of Competing Human Rights Claims.Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im - 2013 - Constellations 20 (1):7-17.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Competing Religious Claims.William J. Wainwright - 2004 - In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  5
    Use of a Balanced Test to Resolve Competing Best Interest and Liberty Claims When Parents Refuse Consent for Neonatal Pulse Oximetry.Allan J. Jacobs & Kavita Shah Arora - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (1):28-29.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Why It Matters That Some Are Worse Off Than Others: An Argument Against the Priority View.Michael Otsuka & Alex Voorhoeve - 2009 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (2):171-199.
    We argue that there is a marked shift in the moral weight of an increment in a person's well-being when one moves from a case involving only intra-personal trade-offs to a case involving only inter-personal trads-offs. This shift, we propose, is required by the separateness of persons. We also argue that the Priority View put forward by Parfit cannot account for such a shift. We also outline two alternative views, an egalitarian view and a claims-based view, that can account (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  14. Why One Should Count Only Claims with Which One Can Sympathize.Alex Voorhoeve - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (2):148-156.
    When one faces competing claims of varying strength on public resources for health, which claims count? This paper proposes the following answer. One should count, or aggregate, a person’s claim just in case one could sympathize with her desire to prioritize her own claim over the strongest competing claim. It argues that this principle yields appealing case judgments and has a plausible grounding in both sympathetic identification with each person, taken separately, and respect for the person (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  84
    Angry Rats and Scaredy Cats: Lessons From Competing Cognitive Homologies.Isaac Wiegman - 2016 - Biological Theory 11 (4):224-240.
    There have been several recent attempts to think about psychological kinds as homologies. Nevertheless, there are serious epistemic challenges for individuating homologous psychological kinds, or cognitive homologies. Some of these challenges are revealed when we look at competing claims of cognitive homology. This paper considers two competing homology claims that compare human anger with putative aggression systems of nonhuman animals. The competition between these hypotheses has been difficult to resolve in part because of what I call (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  55
    Agents, Impartiality, and the Priority of Claims Over Duties: Diagnosing Why Thomson Still Gets the Trolley Problem Wrong by Appeal to the “Mechanics of Claims”. [REVIEW]Alec Walen & David Wasserman - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):545-571.
    Judith Jarvis Thomson recently argued that it is impermissible for a bystander to turn a runaway trolley from five onto one. But she also argues that a trolley driver is required to do just that. We believe that her argument is flawed in three important ways. She fails to give proper weight to (a) an agent¹s claims not to be required to act in ways he does not want to, (b) impartiality in the weighing of competing patient-claims, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17.  4
    Contemporary Claims of Political Injustice: History and the Race to the Bottom.Naomi Zack - 2018 - Res Philosophica:219-233.
    Injustice theory better serves the oppressed than theories of justice or ideal theory. Humanitarian injustice, political injustice, and legal injustice are distinguished by the rules they violate. Not all who claim political injustice have valid historical grounds, which include past oppression and its legacy. Social class, including culture as well as money, helps explain competing claims of political injustice better than racial identities. Claims of political injustice by the White Mass Recently Politicized are not valid given the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Philosophers Should Be Interested in ‘Common Currency’ Claims in the Cognitive and Behavioural Sciences.David Spurrett - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):211-221.
    A recurring claim in a number of behavioural, cognitive and neuro-scientific literatures is that there is, or must be, a unidimensional ‘common currency’ in which the values of different available options are represented. There is striking variety in the quantities or properties that have been proposed as determinants of the ordering in motivational strength. Among those seriously suggested are pain and pleasure, biological fitness, reward and reinforcement, and utility among economists, who have regimented the notion of utility in a variety (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  20
    Diverse Knowledges and Competing Interests: An Essay on Socio-Technical Problem-Solving.Vincent di Norcia - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (1):83-98.
    Solving complex socio-technical problems, this paper claims, involves diverse knowledges (cognitive diversity), competing interests (social diversity), and pragmatism. To explain this view, this paper first explores two different cases: Canadian pulp and paper mill pollution and siting nuclear reactors in seismically sensitive areas of California. Solving such socio-technically complex problems involves cognitive diversity as well as social diversity and pragmatism. Cognitive diversity requires one to not only recognize relevant knowledges but also to assess their validity. Finally, it is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  20. Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century.Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Democracy and the Claims of Nature, the leading thinkers in the fields of environmental, political, and social theory come together to discuss the tensions and sympathies of democratic ideals and environmental values. The prominent contributors reflect upon where we stand in our understanding of the relationship between democracy and the claims of nature. Democracy and the Claims of Nature bridges the gap between the often competing ideals of the two fields, leading to a greater understanding (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  21.  25
    Contrastive Causal Claims: A Case Study.Georgie Statham - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (3):663-688.
    ABSTRACT Contrastive and deviant/default accounts of causation are becoming increasingly common. However, discussions of these accounts have neglected important questions, including how the context determines the contrasts, and what shared knowledge is necessary for this to be possible. I address these questions, using organic chemistry as a case study. Focusing on one example—nucleophilic substitution—I show that the kinds of causal claims that can be made about an organic reaction depend on how the reaction is modelled, and argue that paying (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    The Impact of Transformations in National Cultural Identity Upon Competing Constitutional Narratives in the United States of America.Frederick Lewis - 2012 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (2):177-195.
    Shifts in the national cultural identity of the US have been reflected in shifts in the US’ dominant constitutional narratives. For the United States, “inter-legality” has been less a matter of dealing with alternative non-state legal narratives than of contending with constantly arising and competing narratives about the “correct” nature of the “official” legal order of the state. The US Supreme Court has claimed to have the “last word” in resolving these arguments but because that Court is so often (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century.Ben A. Minteer & Bob Pepperman Taylor (eds.) - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Democracy and the Claims of Nature, the leading thinkers in the fields of environmental, political, and social theory come together to discuss the tensions and sympathies of democratic ideals and environmental values. The prominent contributors reflect upon where we stand in our understanding of the relationship between democracy and the claims of nature. Democracy and the Claims of Nature bridges the gap between the often competing ideals of the two fields, leading to a greater understanding (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  7
    Up Against the Property Logic of Equality Law: Conservative Christian Accommodation Claims and Gay Rights. [REVIEW]Davina Cooper & Didi Herman - 2013 - Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):61-80.
    This paper explores conservative Christian demands that religious-based objections to providing services to lesbians and gay men should be accommodated by employers and public bodies. Focusing on a series of court judgments, alongside commentators’ critical accounts, the paper explores the dominant interpretation of the conflict as one involving two groups with deeply held, competing interests, and suggests this interpretation can be understood through a social property framework. The paper explores how religious beliefs and sexual orientation are attachments whose power (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25. The Pigou-Dalton Principle and the Structure of Distributive Justice.Matthew Adler - manuscript
    The Pigou-Dalton (PD) principle recommends a non-leaky, non-rank-switching transfer of goods from someone with more goods to someone with less. This Article defends the PD principle as an aspect of distributive justice—enabling the comparison of two distributions, neither completely equal, as more or less just. It shows how the PD principle flows from a particular view, adumbrated by Thomas Nagel, about the grounding of distributive justice in individuals’ “claims.” And it criticizes two competing frameworks for thinking about justice (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Bridging a Fault Line: On Underdetermination and the Ampliative Adequacy of Competing Theories.Guy Axtell - 2014 - In Editor Abrol Fairweather (ed.), Virtue Epistemology Naturalized. Synthese Library. pp. 227-245.
    This paper pursues Ernan McMullin‘s claim ("Virtues of a Good Theory" and related papers on theory-choice) that talk of theory virtues exposes a fault-line in philosophy of science separating "very different visions" of scientific theorizing. It argues that connections between theory virtues and virtue epistemology are substantive rather than ornamental, since both address underdetermination problems in science, helping us to understand the objectivity of theory choice and more specifically what I term the ampliative adequacy of scientific theories. The paper argues (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  35
    QALYS and the Integration of Claims in Health Care Rationing.Paul Anand - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (3):239-253.
    The paper argues against the polarisation of the health economics literature into pro- and anti-QALY camps. In particular, we suggest that a crucial distinction should be made between the QALY measure as a metric of health, and QALY maximisation as an applied social choice rule. We argue against the rule but for the measure and that the appropriate conceptualisation of health-care rationing decisions should see the main task as the integration of competing and possibly incommensurable normative claim types. We (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Another Defence of the Priority View.Derek Parfit - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (3):399-440.
    This article discusses the relation between prioritarian and egalitarian principles, whether and why we need to appeal to both kinds of principle, how prioritarians can answer various objections, especially those put forward by Michael Otsuka and Alex Voorhoeve, the moral difference between cases in which our acts could affect only one person or two or more people, veil of ignorance contractualism and utilitarianism, what prioritarians should claim about cases in which the effects of our acts are uncertain, the relative moral (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  29. Single Scoreboard Semantics.Keith DeRose - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 119 (1-2):1-21.
    What happens to the "conversational score" when speakers in a conversation push the score for a context-sensitive term in different directions? In epistemology, contextualists are often construed as holding that both the skeptic ("You don't know!") and her opponent ("Oh, yes I do!") speak truthfully when they debate. This assumes a "multiple scoreboards" version of contextualism. But contextualists themselves typically opt for "single scoreboard" views on which such apparently competing claims really do conflict. This paper explores several single (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   40 citations  
  30.  9
    The New Anarchy: Globalisation and Fragmentation in World Politics.G. Cerny Philip & Prichard Alex - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (3):378-394.
    Modern International Relations theory has consistently underestimated the depth of the problem of anarchy in world politics. Contemporary theories of globalisation bring this into bold relief. From this perspective, the complexity of transboundary networks and hierarchies, economic sectors, ethnic and religious ties, civil and cross-border wars, and internally disaggregated and transnationally connected state actors, leads to a complex and multidimensional restructuring of the global, the local and the uneven connections in between. We ought to abandon the idea of ‘high’ and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31. Years of Feminist Empiricism and Standpoint Theory: Where Are We Now?Kristen Intemann - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):778-796.
    Over the past twenty-five years, numerous articles in Hypatia have clarified, revised, and defended increasingly more nuanced views of both feminist empiricism and standpoint feminism. Feminist empiricists have argued that scientific knowledge is contextual and socially situated (Longino 1990; Nelson 1990; Anderson 1995), and standpoint feminists have begun to endorse virtues of theory choice that have been traditionally empiricist (Wylie 2003). In fact, it is unclear whether substantive differences remain. I demonstrate that current versions of feminist empiricism and standpoint feminism (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  32. An Ethical Perspective on CEO Compensation.Mel Perel - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):381-391.
    The controversial issue of whether Chief Executive Officer (CEO) compensation is excessive or appropriate is examined in terms of two competing claims: that CEOs are overpaid for the value they provide to an enterprise, and that CEO compensation is inherently equitable. Various arguments and perspectives on both sides of the issue are assessed. Little evidence supports the claim that CEO performance justifies very high compensation. Further, the complex interactive alliance between boards of directors and CEOs compromises rational decision-making (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  33. The Unique Groundability of Temporal Facts.John Cusbert & Kristie Millier - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 94 (1).
    The A-theory and the B-theory advance competing claims about how time is grounded. The A-theory says that A-facts are more fundamental in grounding time than are B-facts, and the B-theory says the reverse. We argue that whichever theory is true of the actual world is also true of all possible worlds containing time. We do this by arguing that time is uniquely groundable: however time is actually grounded, it is necessarily grounded in that way. It follows that if (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Prioritarianism and the Separateness of Persons.Michael Otsuka - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (3):365-380.
    For a prioritarian by contrast to a utilitarian, whether a certain quantity of utility falls within the boundary of one person's life or another's makes the following moral difference: the worse the life of a person who could receive a given benefit, the stronger moral reason we have to confer this benefit on this person. It would seem, therefore, that prioritarianism succeeds, where utilitarianism fails, to ‘take seriously the distinction between persons’. Yet I show that, contrary to these appearances, prioritarianism (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  35.  11
    John Stuart Mill on Luck and Distributive Justice.Piers Norris Turner - forthcoming - In Ian M. Church & Robert J. Hartman (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Theories of Luck.
    My aim in this chapter is to place John Stuart Mill’s distinctive utilitarian political philosophy in the context of the debate about luck, responsibility, and equality. I hope it will reveal the extent to which his utilitarianism provides a helpful framework for synthesizing the competing claims of luck and relational egalitarianism. I attempt to show that when Mill’s distributive justice commitments are not decided by direct appeal to overall happiness, they are guided by three main public principles: an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  44
    Evidence-Based Ethics? On Evidence-Based Practice and the "Empirical Turn" From Normative Bioethics.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2005 - BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-9.
    Background The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. Discussion The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  37.  85
    The Mechanisms of Emergence.R. Keith Sawyer - 2004 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (2):260-282.
    This article focuses on emergence in social systems. The author begins by proposing a new tool to explore the mechanisms of social emergence: multi agent–based computer simulation. He then draws on philosophy of mind to develop an account of social emergence that raises potential problems for the methodological individualism of both social mechanism and of multi agent simulation. He then draws on various complexity concepts to propose a set of criteria whereby one can determine whether a given social mechanism generates (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  38.  74
    Ignorance, Information and Autonomy.John Harris & Kirsty Keywood - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):415-436.
    People have a powerful interest in geneticprivacy and its associated claim to ignorance,and some equally powerful desires to beshielded from disturbing information are oftenvoiced. We argue, however, that there is nosuch thing as a right to remain in ignorance,where a right is understood as an entitlementthat trumps competing claims. This doesnot of course mean that information must alwaysbe forced upon unwilling recipients, only thatthere is no prima facie entitlement to beprotected from true or honest information aboutoneself. Any (...) to be shielded frominformation about the self must compete onequal terms with claims based in the rights andinterests of others. In balancing the weightand importance of rival considerations aboutgiving or withholding information, if rightsclaims have any place, rights are more likelyto be defensible on the side of honestcommunication of information rather than indefence of ignorance. The right to free speechand the right to decline to acceptresponsibility to take decisions for othersimposed by those others seem to us moreplausible candidates for fully fledged rightsin this field than any purported right toignorance. Finally, and most importantly, ifthe right to autonomy is invoked, a properunderstanding of the distinction between claimsto liberty and claims to autonomy show that theprinciple of autonomy, as it is understood incontemporary social ethics and English law,supports the giving rather than the withholdingof information in most circumstances. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  39.  47
    Can a Compromise Be Fair?P. Jones & I. O'Flynn - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (2):115-135.
    This article examines the relationship between compromise and fairness, and considers in particular why, if a fair outcome to a conflict is available, the conflict should still be subject to compromise. It sets out the defining features of compromise and explains how fair compromise differs from both principled and pragmatic compromise. The fairness relating to compromise can be of two types: procedural or end-state. It is the coherence of end-state fairness with compromise that proves the more puzzling case. We offer (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  40.  42
    Moral Stress: Considering the Nature and Effects of Managerial Moral Uncertainty. [REVIEW]Scott J. Reynolds, Bradley P. Owens & Alex L. Rubenstein - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):491-502.
    To better illuminate aspects of stress that are relevant to the moral domain, we present a definition and theoretical model of “moral stress.” Our definition posits that moral stress is a psychological state born of an individual’s uncertainty about his or her ability to fulfill relevant moral obligations. This definition assumes a self-and-others relational basis for moral stress. Accordingly, our model draws from a theory of the self (identity theory) and a theory of others (stakeholder theory) to suggest that this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  41.  12
    Evidence-Based Ethics? On Evidence-Based Practice and The.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2005 - BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):11.
    BackgroundThe increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics.DiscussionThe recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  42.  13
    [Book Review] the Worth of a Child. [REVIEW]Thomas H. Murray - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (3):44.
    Thomas Murray's graceful and humane book illuminates one of the most morally complex areas of everyday life: the relationship between parents and children. What do children mean to their parents, and how far do parental obligations go? What, from the beginning of life to its end, is the worth of a child? Ethicist Murray leaves the rarefied air of abstract moral philosophy in order to reflect on the moral perplexities of ordinary life and ordinary people. Observing that abstract moral terms (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  43. Priority and Desert.Matthew Rendall - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):939-951.
    Michael Otsuka, Alex Voorhoeve and Marc Fleurbaey have challenged the priority view in favour of a theory based on competing claims. The present paper shows how their argument can be used to recast the priority view. All desert claims in distributive justice are comparative. The stronger a party’s claims to a given benefit, the greater is the value of her receiving it. Ceteris paribus, the worse-off have stronger claims on welfare, and benefits to them matter (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  55
    The Equality of Lotteries.Ben Saunders - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (3):359-372.
    Lotteries have long been used to resolve competing claims, yet their recent implementation to allocate school places in Brighton and Hove, England led to considerable public outcry. This article argues that, given appropriate selection is impossible when parties have equal claims, a lottery is preferable to an auction because it excludes unjust influences. Three forms of contractualism are discussed and the fairness of lotteries is traced to the fact that they give each person an equal chance, as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45. "I Paid For This Microphone!" The Importance Of Shareholder Theory In Business Ethics.David Levy & Mark Mitschow - 2009 - Libertarian Papers 1:25.
    Two prominent normative theories of business ethics are stakeholder and shareholder theory. Business ethicists generally favor the former, while business people prefer the latter. If the purpose of business ethics is “to produce a set of ethical principles that can be both expressed in language accessible to and conveniently applied by an ordinary business person” , then it is important to examine this dichotomy.While superficially attractive, the normative version of stakeholder theory contains numerous limitations. Since balancing multiple stakeholder preferences is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  85
    Race and Racial Profiling.Annabelle Lever - forthcoming - In Naomi Zack (ed.), Oxford HANDBOOK OF PHILOSOPHY OF RACE.
    Philosophical reflection on racial profiling tends to take one of two forms. The first sees it as an example of ‘statistical discrimination,’ (SD), raising the question of when, if ever, probabilistic generalisations about group behaviour or characteristics can be used to judge particular individuals.(Applbaum 2014; Harcourt 2004; Hellman, 2014; Risse and Zeckhauser 2004; Risse 2007; Lippert-Rasmussen 2006; Lippert-Rasmussen 2007; Lippert-Rasmussen 2014) . This approach treats racial profiling as one example amongst many others of a general problem in egalitarian political philosophy, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  94
    Virtuous Victory: Running Up the Score and the Anti-Blowout Thesis.Jason Taylor & Christopher Johnson - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):247-266.
    A difficult question in the philosophy of sport concerns how winning athletes should perform in uneven contests in which victory has been secured well before the competition is over. Nicholas Dixon, the protagonist in the ongoing debate, argues against critics who urge following an 'anti-blowout' thesis that there is nothing intrinsically wrong with running up the score. We engage this debate, providing much needed distinctions, and draw on Aristotelian resources to explore a framework by which to understand competing (...) found within the literature. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  38
    Stakeholder Value Equilibration and the Entrepreneurial Process.S. Venkataraman - 2002 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2002:45-57.
    This lecture explores the possibility of a useful dialogue between the fields of entrepreneurship and business ethics for mutual benefit. Although these two fields have much to offer each other, they have developed largely independently of each other. The lecture argues that entrepreneurship has a role to play in stakeholder theory and, relatedly, that stakeholder theory enriches our understanding of the entrepreneurial process. The lecture introduces the idea that a firm is an equilibrating mechanism, and then asks two questions, namely, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  49.  9
    The Value and Limits of Rights: A Reply.Peter Jones - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (4):495-516.
    I reply to each of the contributions in this issue. I agree with much that Hillel Steiner argues, especially his insistence that the associated ideas of impartiality and discontinuity are crucial to dealing satisfactorily with a diversity of competing claims. I am, however, less willing to conceive provision for that diversity as the role, rather than a role, that we should ascribe to rights. I question the success of David Miller?s endeavour to provide a unified justification of human (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50.  13
    From Public Interest to Political Justice.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (1):20-27.
    In this paper I examine the ways in which the concept of “public interest” is used in biomedical policymaking to justify the preemption or overruling of decisions made by individuals about their own, their family's, or group interests in the field of healthcare. I discuss six variants of public-interest justification, before going on to consider a concrete example, the use of personal health data in health services management and medical research. I distinguish between the global public interest and particular public (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000