Results for 'complicity'

334 found
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  1.  51
    The Duty to Protect: Corporate Complicity, Political Responsibility, and Human Rights Advocacy. [REVIEW]Florian Wettstein - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):33 - 47.
    Recent years have heralded increasing attention to the role of multinational corporations in regard to human rights violations. The concept of complicity has been of particular interest in this regard. This article explores the conceptual differences between silent complicity in particular and other, more "conventional" forms of complicity. Despite their far-reaching normative implications, these differences are often overlooked.Rather than being connected to specific actions as is the case for other forms of complicity, the concept of silent (...)
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  2. Individual Complicity in Collective Wrongdoing.Brian Lawson - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):227-243.
    Some instances of right and wrongdoing appear to be of a distinctly collective kind. When, for example, one group commits genocide against another, the genocide is collective in the sense that the wrongness of genocide seems morally distinct from the aggregation of individual murders that make up the genocide. The problem, which I refer to as the problem of collective wrongs, is that it is unclear how to assign blame for distinctly collective wrongdoing to individual contributors when none of those (...)
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  3.  55
    On Complicity Theory.A. David Kline - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):257-264.
    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, (...)
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  4.  60
    Complicity and the Rwandan Genocide.Larry May - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (2):135-152.
    The Rwandan genocide of 1994 occurred due to widespread complicity. I will argue that complicity can be the basis for legal liability, even for criminal liability, if two conditions are met. First, the person’s actions or inactions must be causally efficacious at least in the sense that had the person not committed these actions or inactions the harm would have been made significantly less likely to occur. Second, the person must know that her actions or inactions risk contributing (...)
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  5.  19
    On Complicity and Compromise: A Reply to Peter French and Steven Ratner.Chiara Lepora & Robert E. Goodin - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (3):591-602.
    Peter French’s and Steven Ratner’s thoughtful comments are helpful in advancing the analysis we offered in our book On Complicity and Compromise. Inevitably, there are areas of disagreement and bones to pick. However, our primary concern in this reply will be to press, with their assistance, the more positive agenda.
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  6.  2
    Institutional Evils, Culpable Complicity, and Duties to Engage in Moral Repair.Eliana Peck & Ellen K. Feder - 2017 - Metaphilosophy 48 (3):203-226.
    Apology is arguably the central act of the reparative work required after wrongdoing. The analysis by Claudia Card of complicity in collectively perpetrated evils moves one to ask whether apology ought to be requested of persons culpably complicit in institutional evils. To better appreciate the benefits of and barriers to apologies offered by culpably complicit wrongdoers, this article examines doctors’ complicity in a practice that meets Card's definition of an evil, namely, the non-medically necessary, nonconsensual “normalizing” interventions performed (...)
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  7.  32
    Complicity: That Moral Monster, Troubling Matters.Peter A. French - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (3):575-589.
    In the criminal law of many jurisdictions complicity, though not itself a substantive crime but a way of committing a crime, is a doctrine that determines when one person is legally liable for a criminal offense that was committed by another person, typically by being an accomplice. That doctrine has a number of troubling moral implications with respect to responsibility, particularly when complicity is employed as a devise to capture one agent as morally accountable for the actions of (...)
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  8.  30
    Complicity and Criminal Liability in Rwanda: A Situationist Critique.Michelle Ciurria - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (4):411-419.
    In Complicity and the Rwandan Genocide ( 2010b ), Larry May argues that complicity can be the basis for criminal liability if two conditions are met: First, the person’s actions or inactions must contribute to the harm in question, and secondly, the person must know that his actions or inactions risk contributing to this harm. May also states that the threshold for guilt for criminal liability is higher than for moral responsibility. I agree with this latter claim, but (...)
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  9.  28
    First Degree Murder and Complicity—Conditions for Parity of Culpability Between Principal and Accomplice.Robert Sullivan - 2007 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (3):271-288.
    The Law Commission for England and Wales has published for consultation a proposal for an offence of first degree murder. A person found guilty of this offence whether as a principal or an accomplice will receive a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment. It is argued that the conditions for liability as an accomplice put forward by the Commission do not fulfil the Commission's aspiration for a "parity of culpability" between principals and accomplices. The discussion has general implications for the reform (...)
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  10.  58
    Causeless Complicity.Christopher Kutz - 2007 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (3):289-305.
    I argue, contrary to standard claims, that accomplice liability need not be a causal relation. One can be an accomplice to another’s crime without causally contributing to the criminal act of the principal. This is because the acts of aid and encouragement that constitute the basis for accomplice liability typically occur in contexts of under- and over-determination, where causal analysis is confounded. While causation is relevant to justifying accomplice liability in general, only potential causation is necessary in particular cases. I (...)
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  11. Compromise and Moral Complicity in the Embryonic Stem Cell Debate.Katrien Devolder & John Harris - 2005 - In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  12.  4
    Cooperation, Complicity & Conscience: Problems in Healthcare, Science, Law and Public Policy.Helen Watt (ed.) - 2006 - Linacre Centre.
    Cooperation in evil or wrongdoing is one of the most perplexing areas in bioethics, both for those working in the field and those seeking their advice. The papers collected in this book are written by philosophers, theologians and lawyers who have studied these problems and / or by those who have faced these problems in their own work in law, healthcare and research, and political campaigning. The volume includes both general treatments of the subject of cooperation and conscientious objection, and (...)
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  13.  8
    U.S. Complicity and Japan's Wartime Medical Atrocities: Time for a Response.Katrien Devolder - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):40-49.
    Shortly before and during the Second World War, Japanese doctors and medical researchers conducted large-scale human experiments in occupied China that were at least as gruesome as those conducted by Nazi doctors. Japan never officially acknowledged the occurrence of the experiments, never tried any of the perpetrators, and never provided compensation to the victims or issued an apology. Building on work by Jing-Bao Nie, this article argues that the U.S. government is heavily complicit in this grave injustice, and should respond (...)
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  14.  20
    Silence as Complicity.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):37-61.
    Increasingly, global businesses are confronted with the question of complicity in human rights violations committed by abusive host governments. This contribution specifically looks at silent complicity and the way it challenges conventional interpretations of corporate responsibility. Silent complicity impliesthat corporations have moral obligations that reach beyond the negative realm of doing no harm. Essentially, it implies that corporations have a moral responsibility to help protect human rights by putting pressure on perpetrating host governments involved in human rights (...)
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  15. Complicity and Causality.John Gardner - 2007 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (2):127-141.
    This paper considers some aspects of the morality of complicity, understood as participation in the wrongs of another. The central question is whether there is some way of participating in the wrongs of another other than by making a causal contribution to them. I suggest that there is not. In defending this view I encounter, and resist, the claim that it undermines the distinction between principals and accomplices. I argue that this distinction is embedded in the structure of rational (...)
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  16.  8
    On Complicity and Compromise.Chiara Lepora - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on philosophy, law and political science, and on a wealth of practical experience delivering emergency medical services in conflict-ridden settings, Lepora and Goodin untangle the complexities surrounding compromise and complicity.
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  17.  15
    Vigilance as a Response to White Complicity.Barbara Applebaum - 2013 - Educational Theory 63 (1):17-34.
    Calls for vigilance have been a recurrent theme in social justice education. Scholars making this call note that vigilance involves a continuous attentiveness, that it presumes some type of criticality, and that it is transformative. In this essay Barbara Applebaum expands upon some of these attributes and calls attention to three particular features of vigilance that, while they may be alluded to in the aforementioned discussions, are rarely made explicit. These three features are critique, staying in the anxiety of critique, (...)
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  18. Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research.Mark T. Brown - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 1-22.
    Direct reprogramming of human skin cells makes available a source of pluripotent stem cells without the perceived evil of embryo destruction, but the advent of such a powerful biotechnology entangles stem cell research in other forms of moral complicity. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research had its origins in human embryonic stem cell research and the projected biomedical applications of iPS cells almost certainly will require more embryonic stem cell research. Policies that inhibit iPSC research in order to avoid (...)
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  19.  27
    Complicity, Collectives, and Killing in War.Seth Lazar - 2016 - Law and Philosophy 35 (4):365-389.
    Recent work on the ethics of war has struggled to simultaneously justify two central tenets of international law: the Permission to kill enemy combatants, and the Prohibition on targeting enemy noncombatants. Recently, just war theorists have turned to collectivist considerations as a way out of this problem. In this paper, I reject the argument that all and only unjust combatants are liable to be killed in virtue of their complicity in the wrongful war fought by their side, and that (...)
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  20.  31
    Complicity and Modularization: How Universities Were Made Safe for the Market.Bob Brecher - unknown
    Education has always occupied a contradictory position in society, expected to ensure compliance and continuity and yet to encourage critique and renewal. Since the early 1980s, however, successive UK governments have directly mobilised education, and higher education in particular, as an ideological tool in the task of embedding neo-liberalism as ‘common sense’. Modularisation has been in the vanguard, first in the universities, more latterly at secondary level. The effect has been disastrous: here as elsewhere, choice has become depressingly fetishised; knowledge, (...)
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  21.  8
    White Complicity and Social Justice Education: Can One Be Culpable Without Being Liable?Barbara Applebaum - 2007 - Educational Theory 57 (4):453-467.
    In part of an ongoing study of white complicity, moral responsibility, and moral agency in social justice education, Barbara Applebaum asks in this essay what model or models of moral responsibility can help white students recognize their white complicity and which models of moral responsibility obscure such acknowledgment. To address this question, she explores the concept of white complicity and its relation to racism and raises some compelling conceptual and pedagogical questions. Then she reviews a recent analysis (...)
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  22.  5
    Consumer Complicity and Labor Exploitation.Gillian Brock - 2016 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):113-125.
    Are consumers in high-income countries complicit in labor exploitation when they buy good produced in sweatshops? To focus attention we consider cases of labor exploitation such as those of exposing workers to very high risks of irreversible diseases, for instance, by failing to provide adequate safety equipment. If I purchase a product made under such conditions, what is my part in this exploitation? Is my contribution one of complicity that is blameworthy? If so, what ought I to do about (...)
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  23.  11
    Nursing, Obedience, and Complicity with Eugenics: A Contextual Interpretation of Nursing Morality at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.M. Berghs - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):117-122.
    This paper uses Margaret Urban Walker’s “expressive collaborative” method of moral inquiry to examine and illustrate the morality of nurses in Great Britain from around 1860 to 1915, as well as nursing complicity in one of the first eugenic policies. The authors aim to focus on how context shapes and limits morality and agency in nurses and contributes to a better understanding of debates in nursing ethics both in the past and present.
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  24.  62
    Grading Complicity in Rwandan Refugee Camps.Chiara Lepora & Robert E. Goodin - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):259-276.
    Complicity with wrongdoing comes in many forms and many degrees. We distinguish subcategories cooperation, collaboration and collusion from connivance and condoning, identifying their defining features and assessing their characteristic moral valences. We illustrate the use of these distinctions by reference to events in refugee camps in and around Rwanda after the 1994 genocide, and the extent to which international organizations and nongovernment organizations were wrongfully complicit with the misuse of refugees as human shields by the perpetrators of the genocide (...)
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  25.  41
    Dirty Hands and the Complicity of the Democratic Public.David Archard - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):777-790.
    The alleged problem of the dirty hands of politicians has been much discussed since Michael Walzer’s original piece (Walzer 1974). The discussion has concerned the precise nature of the problem or sought to dissolve the apparent paradox. However there has been little discussion of the putative complicity, and thus also dirtying of hands, of a democratic public that authorizes politicians to act in its name. This article outlines the sense in which politicians do get dirty hands and the degree (...)
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  26.  16
    Complicity.Margaret Gilbert - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):236-239.
    Review of CHRISTOPHER KUTZ. Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
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  27.  6
    Institutionally Driven Moral Conflicts and Managerial Action: Dirty Hands or Permissible Complicity?Rosemarie Monge - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (1):161-175.
    This paper examines what managers ought to do when confronted with apparent moral conflicts between their managerial responsibilities and the general requirements of morality, specifically when those conflicts are driven by the institutional environment. I examine Google’s decision to enter the Chinese search engine market as an example of such a conflict. I consider the view that Google’s managers engaged in justifiable moral compromise in making the choice to engage in self-censorship and show how this view depends on the idea (...)
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  28.  15
    Learning to Leave Liberalism…and Live with Complicity, Conundrum and Moral Chagrin.Dwight Boyd - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):329-337.
    This paper is a story of personal learning. I locate its beginning in my early, comfortable adoption of liberalism as the preferred perspective for my work as a philosopher of education. I then trace how and why I became disaffected with this perspective. I describe how learning from students, feminism and critical race theory led to an acceptance of the fact that my particular social locations as a white, upper-middle-class, educated, heterosexual man are not politically neutral as liberalism would have (...)
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  29.  15
    Race Ignore-Ance, Colortalk, and White Complicity: White is…White Isn't1.Barbara Applebaum - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (3):345-362.
    In this review essay, Barbara Applebaum uses white complicity as a framework for discussing three books: Mica Pollock’s Colormute: Race Talk Dilemmas in an American School, Debra Van Ausdale and Joe R. Feagin’s The First R: How Children Learn Race and Racist, and Virginia Lea and Judy Helfand’s Identifying Race and Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom. She explains the notion of white complicity and discusses some of the deep philosophical questions involving moral responsibility and agency that arise when (...)
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  30.  6
    Research and Complicity: The Case of Julius Hallervorden.F. G. Miller - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):53-56.
    The charge of complicity has been raised in debates over the ethics of fetal tissue transplantation and embryonic stem cell research. However, the applicability of the concept of complicity to these types of research is neither clear nor uncontroversial. This article discusses the historical case of Julius Hallervorden, a distinguished German neuropathologist who conducted research on brains of mentally handicapped patients killed in the context of the Nazi ‘euthanasia’ programme. It is argued that this case constitutes a paradigm (...)
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  31.  3
    Criminals in the Citadel and Deceit All Along the Watchtower: Irresponsibility, Fraud, and Complicity in the Search for Scientific Truth.Prathap Tharyan - 2012 - Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):158.
    Scientific research aims to use reliable methods to produce generalizable new knowledge in order to understand the human condition and maximize human potential. The sanctity accorded to scientific research has been violated by numerous instances of research fraud, as well as deceptive and conflicted research that have seriously harmed people, subverted the evidence-base, wasted valuable resources, and undermined public trust. This deception by individuals has been fostered by the unrealistic expectations of society; facilitated by the complicity of institutions and (...)
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  32.  6
    Complicity in Thought and Language: Toleration of Wrong.Judith Lee Kissell - 1999 - Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (1):49-60.
    Complicity as toleration of wrong is deeply rooted in Western language and narratives. It is based on assumptions about the self, our relationship to the world and personal accountability that differ from the Common Law's and moral theology's standard doctrines. How we blame others for tolerating wrong depends upon the moral force of public discourse and upon the meaning of censure as exhortation. Censure as blame is usually retrospective, while censure as exhortation is forward-looking and stresses moral maturity and (...)
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  33.  1
    Coppola's Conrad: The Repetitions of Complicity.Garrett Stewart - 1981 - Critical Inquiry 7 (3):455-474.
    The ending of neither story [Heart of Darkness] nor film [Apocalypse Now] is confused, just bifocal. In Coppola we find writ large, for Willard as well as for us, what Conrad seems to keep from Marlowe by ironic distance: that the return to civilization from primitive haunts can never lay the ghostly image of that bestial horror lurking within us, the horror that finds such kinship, regressed beyond any ethical restraint, in the jungle's heart of darkness. It is a horror (...)
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  34. Being White, Being Good: White Complicity, White Moral Responsibility, and Social Justice Pedagogy.Barbara Applebaum - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    Being White, Being Good focuses on white complicity and white complicity pedagogy. It examines the shifts in our conceptualization of the subject, language and moral responsibility that are required for understanding white complicity and draws out implications for social justice pedagogy.
     
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  35.  18
    Market Complicity and Christian Ethics.Albino Barrera - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Part I. Theory: Material Cooperation in Economic Life: 1. The nature of material cooperation and moral complicity; 2. Complicity in what?: The problem of accumulative harms; 3. Too small and morally insignificant? The problem of overdetermination; 4. Who is morally responsible in the chain of causation? The problem of interdependence; Part II. Application: A Typology of Market-Mediated Complicity: A. Hard Complicity: 5. Benefiting from and enabling wrongdoing; 6. Precipitating gratuitous harms; B. (...)
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  36. Distant Markets, Distant Harms: Economic Complicity and Christian Ethics.Daniel Finn (ed.) - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Distant Harms, Distant Markets looks at moral complicity in markets, employing resources from sociology, early Christian history, feminism, legal theory, and Catholic moral theology today. The authors skillfully explore the causal and moral responsibilities which consumers bear for the harms that markets cause to distant others.
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  37. Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age.Christopher Kutz - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    We live in a morally flawed world. Our lives are complicated by what other people do, and by the harms that flow from our social, economic and political institutions. Our relations as individuals to these collective harms constitute the domain of complicity. This book examines the relationship between collective responsibility and individual guilt. It presents a rigorous philosophical account of the nature of our relations to the social groups in which we participate, and uses that account in a discussion (...)
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  38. On Complicity and Compromise.Chiara Lepora & Robert E. Goodin - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Drawing on philosophy, law and political science, and on a wealth of practical experience delivering emergency medical services in conflict-ridden settings, Lepora and Goodin untangle the complexities surrounding compromise and complicity.
     
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  39. Exploring Complicity: Concept, Cases and Critique.Michael Neu, Robin Dunford & Afxentis Afxentiou (eds.) - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book explores the concept of and cases of complicity in an interdisciplinary context. It in part covers cases of direct complicity, where an agent or set of agents facilitates an identifiable act of wrongdoing. The book also draws attention to the manner in which agents become complicit in the reproduction of wider practices of wrongdoing. It goes on to explore the notion of complicity through a series of cases emerging from a variety of academic disciplines and (...)
     
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  40. Compliance, Complicity, and the Nature of Nonideal Conditions.Tamar Schapiro - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (7):329-355.
  41.  27
    On the Take: How America's Complicity with Big Business Can Endanger Your Health.Jerome P. Kassirer - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    We all know that doctors accept gifts from drug companies, ranging from pens and coffee mugs to free vacations at luxurious resorts. But as the former Editor-in-Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine reveals in this shocking expose, these innocuous-seeming gifts are just the tip of an iceberg that is distorting the practice of medicine and jeopardizing the health of millions of Americans today. In On the Take, Dr. Jerome Kassirer offers an unsettling look at the pervasive payoffs that (...)
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  42.  24
    The United States Cover-Up of Japanese Wartime Medical Atrocities: Complicity Committed in the National Interest and Two Proposals for Contemporary Action.Jing-Bao Nie - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):W21-W33.
  43.  6
    Moore on Causing, Acting, and Complicity.Gideon Yaffe - 2012 - Legal Theory 18 (4):437-458.
    In Michael Moore's important book Causation and Responsibility, he holds that causal contribution matters to responsibility independently of its relevance to action. We are responsible for our actions, according to Moore, because where there is action, we typically also find the kind of causal contribution that is crucial for responsibility. But it is causation, and not action, that bears the normative weight. This paper assesses this claim and argues that Moore's reasons for it are unconvincing. It is suggested that sometimes (...)
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  44.  12
    International Business, Human Rights, and Moral Complicity: A Call for a Declaration on the Universal Rights and Duties of Business.W. Michael Hoffman & Robert E. Mcnulty - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (4):541-570.
  45.  62
    'Cosmetic Neurology' and the Moral Complicity Argument.A. Ravelingien, J. Braeckman, L. Crevits, D. De Ridder & E. Mortier - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (3):151-162.
    Over the past decades, mood enhancement effects of various drugs and neuromodulation technologies have been proclaimed. If one day highly effective methods for significantly altering and elevating one’s mood are available, it is conceivable that the demand for them will be considerable. One urgent concern will then be what role physicians should play in providing such services. The concern can be extended from literature on controversial demands for aesthetic surgery. According to Margaret Little, physicians should be aware that certain aesthetic (...)
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  46.  18
    The Role of Moral Complicity in Issues of Conscience.Robert D. Orr - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):23 – 24.
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  47.  16
    Hospice and Physician-Assisted Death: Collaboration, Compliance, and Complicity.Courtney S. Campbell & Jessica C. Cox - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (5):26-35.
  48.  30
    Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age.L. May - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):483-486.
  49.  15
    From Complicity to Advocacy: The Necessity of Refugee Research.Cecile Rousseau & Laurence Kirmayer - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):65-67.
  50.  3
    Heesoon Bai is Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada. She Teaches Philosophy of Education, and Her Research Interests Are in Ethics, Epistemology, Ecology, and Asian Philosophies. Recent Publications Include Co-Authored Article,“'To See a World in a Grain of Sand': Complexity and Moral Education,” in Complicity: An International Journal of Complex. [REVIEW]Gert Biesta - 2008 - In Denise Egéa-Kuehne (ed.), Levinas and Education: At the Intersection of Faith and Reason. Routledge. pp. 287.
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