Results for 'confidentiality'

806 found
Order:
See also
  1. 34 Chapter 2 Ethical Dimensions of Therapist-Patient Roles and Relationships.D. Confidentiality - forthcoming - Bioethics.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Subject Index to Volume 29.Teen Smokers, Adolescent Patient Confidentiality & Whom Are We Kidding - 2001 - Substance 125 (131):279.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  29
    Medical Confidentiality: Legal and Ethical Aspects in Greece: Country Report.Stavroulaa Papadodima - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):397-405.
    Respect for confidentiality is firmly established in codes of ethics and law. Medical care and the patients' trust depend on the ability of the doctors to maintain confidentiality. Without a guarantee of confidentiality, many patients would want to avoid seeking medical assistance The principle of confidentiality, however, is not absolute and may be overridden by public interests. On some occasions (birth, death, infectious disease) there is a legal obligation on the part of the doctor to disclose (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  27
    Factors Influencing Attitudes Towards Medical Confidentiality Among Swiss Physicians.B. S. Elger - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):517-524.
    Medical confidentiality is a core concept of professionalism and should be an integral part of pregraduate and postgraduate medical education. The aim of our study was to define the factors influencing attitudes towards patient confidentiality in everyday situations in order to define the need for offering further education to various subgroups of physicians. All internists and general practitioners who were registered members of the association of physicians in Geneva or who were working in the department of internal medicine (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  27
    Disclosure of Past Crimes: An Analysis of Mental Health Professionals' Attitudes Towards Breaching Confidentiality.Tenzin Wangmo, Violet Handtke & Bernice Simone Elger - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):347-358.
    Ensuring confidentiality is the cornerstone of trust within the doctor–patient relationship. However, health care providers have an obligation to serve not only their patient’s interests but also those of potential victims and society, resulting in circumstances where confidentiality must be breached. This article describes the attitudes of mental health professionals when patients disclose past crimes unknown to the justice system. Twenty-four MHPs working in Swiss prisons were interviewed. They shared their experiences concerning confidentiality practices and attitudes towards (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  35
    Strict Confidentiality: An Alternative to Pre’s “Limited Confidentiality” Doctrine. [REVIEW]John Lowman & Ted Palys - 2007 - Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):163-177.
    In “Advisory Opinion on Confidentiality, Its Limits and Duties to Others” the Canadian Interagency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) articulates a rationale for a priori limitations to research confidentiality, based largely on putative legal duties to violate confidentiality in certain circumstances. We argue that PRE promotes a “Law of the Land” doctrine of research ethics that is but one approach to resolving potential conflicts between law and research ethics. PRE emphasises risks that have never materialized, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  13
    Going Boldly Where No One Has Gone Before? How Confidentiality Risk Aversion is Killing Research on Sensitive Topics.Ted Palys & John Lowman - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):265-284.
    Bernhard and Young (Journal of Academic Ethics, 7, 175-191, 2009) allege that a myth of confidentiality plagues research in North America because of the absence of statute-based legal protections and the requirements of some REBs to limit confidentiality to the extent permitted by law. In this commentary we describe statute-based protections for research confidentiality available in the United States, clarify the legal situation regarding research confidentiality in Canada, and explain that REBs that require confidentiality to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  33
    Defending Research Confidentiality “To the Extent the Law Allows:” Lessons From the Boston College Subpoenas. [REVIEW]Ted Palys & John Lowman - 2012 - Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):271-297.
    Although in the US there have been dozens of subpoenas seeking information gathered by academic researchers under a pledge of confidentiality, few cases have garnered as much attention as the two sets of subpoenas issued to Boston College seeking interviews conducted with IRA operatives who participated in The Belfast Project, an oral history of The Troubles in Northern Ireland. For the researchers and participants, confidentiality was understood to be unlimited, while Boston College has asserted that it pledged (...) only “to the extent American law allows.” This a priori limitation to confidentiality is invoked by many researchers and universities in the United States, Canada and Great Britain, but there has been little discussion of what the phrase means and what ethical obligations accompany it. An examination of the researchers’ and Boston College’s behaviour in relation to the subpoenas provides the basis for that discussion. We conclude that Boston College has provided an example that will be cited for years to come of how not to protect research participants to the extent American law allows. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  25
    What Do Islamic Institutional Fatwas Say About Medical and Research Confidentiality and Breach of Confidentiality?Ghiath Alahmad & Kris Dierickx - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):104-112.
    Protecting confidentiality is an essential value in all human relationships, no less in medical practice and research.1 Doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships are built on trust and on the understanding those patients' secrets will not be disclosed.2 However, this confidentiality can be breached in some situations where it is necessary to meet a strong conflicting duty.3Confidentiality, in a general sense, has received much interest in Islamic resources including the Qur'an, Sunnah and juristic writings. However, medical and research confidentiality (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  45
    Confronting Condescending Ethics: How Community-Based Research Challenges Traditional Approaches to Consent, Confidentiality, and Capacity. [REVIEW]Colleen Reid & Elana Brief - 2009 - Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):75-85.
    Community based research is conducted by, for, and with the participation of community members, and aims to ensure that knowledge contributes to making a concrete and constructive difference in the world (The Loka Institute 2002). Yet decisions about research ethics are often controlled outside the research community itself. In this analysis we grapple with the imposition of a community confidentiality clause and the implications it had for consent, confidentiality, and capacity in a province-wide community based research project. Through (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  74
    The Principle of Caveat Emptor: Confidentiality and Informed Consent as Endemic Ethical Dilemmas in Focus Group Research. [REVIEW]Martin Tolich - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):99-108.
    Informed consent and confidentiality supposedly minimize harm for research participants in all qualitative research methodologies, inclusive of one-on-one unstructured interviews and focus groups. This is not the case for the latter. Confidentiality and informed consent uniquely manifest themselves as endemic ethical dilemmas for focus group researchers. The principle of caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) may be a more useful tool for those involved in focus group research: that is, let the researcher, the participants and the ethics committee (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  59
    Hiv/Aids Reduces the Relevance of the Principle of Individual Medical Confidentiality Among the Bantu People of Southern Africa.Paul Ndebele, Joseph Mfutso-Bengo & Francis Masiye - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (5):331-340.
    The principle of individual medical confidentiality is one of the moral principles that Africa inherited unquestioningly from the West as part of Western medicine. The HIV/AIDS pandemic in Southern Africa has reduced the relevance of the principle of individual medical confidentiality. Individual medical confidentiality has especially presented challenges for practitioners among the Bantu communities that are well known for their social inter-connectedness and the way they value their extended family relations. Individual confidentiality has raised several unforeseen (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  59
    Confidentiality Revisited.Ke Yu - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):161-172.
    This article challenges the importance and necessity of confidentiality, which are often taken for granted, and questions whether the default promise of confidentiality to all participants, particularly in educational research, could in fact be an unnecessary concern. This article begins by reviewing the difference in the way confidentiality is handled in different fields and the applicability of some underlying assumptions. This is followed by an explanation of why confidentiality is investigated in the sense of anonymity in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  92
    The Risks of Absolute Medical Confidentiality.M. A. Crook - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):107-122.
    Some ethicists argue that patient confidentiality is absolute and thus should never be broken. I examine these arguments that when critically scrutinised, become porous. I will explore the concept of patient confidentiality and argue that although, this is a very important medical and bioethical issue, this needs to be wisely delivered to reduce third party harm or even detriment to the patient. The argument for absolute confidentiality is particularly weak when it comes to genetic information and inherited (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  44
    Confidentiality, Consent and Autonomy in the Physician-Patient Relationship.Beverly Woodward - 2001 - Health Care Analysis 9 (3):337-351.
    In the practice of medicine there has long been a conflict between patient management and respect for patient autonomy. In recent years this conflict has taken on a new form as patient management has increasingly been shifted from physicians to insurers, employers, and health care bureaucracies. The consequence has been a diminshment of both physician and patient autonomy and a parallel diminishment of medical record confidentiality. Although the new managers pay lip service to the rights of patients to (...) of their records, in fact they advocate very liberal medical records access policies. They argue that a wide range of parties has a need to know the contents of individually identifiable medical records in order to control costs, promote quality of care, and undertake research in the public interest. Broad interpretations of the need to know, however, are at odds with strict interpretations of the right to confidentiality. Strict confidentiality policies require that, with few exceptions, patient consent be obtained whenever a patient's record is used outside the treatment context. The traditional criterion for overriding the consent requirement has been that without the override some harm would directly result. This rule is now challenged by the claim that patients have a duty to make their records available for a wide range of research and public health purposes. The longstanding tension between physician responsibility for patient welfare and respect for patient autonomy is being replaced by a debatable requirement that both physician and patient autonomy be subordinated to the goals of data collection and analysis. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Confidentiality in Prison Health Care – A Practical Guide.Bernice Elger & David Shaw - forthcoming - In Bernice Elger, Catherine Ritter & Heino Stöver (eds.), Emerging Issues in Prison Health. Springer.
    The importance of medical confidentiality is obvious to anyone who has ever been a patient, and protecting private information about patients is one of the key responsibilities of healthcare professionals. However, maintaining the confidentiality of patients who are incarcerated in prisons poses several ethical challenges. In this chapter we explain the importance of confidentiality in general, and the dilemmas that sometimes face doctors with regard to it, before describing some of the specific difficulties faced by prison doctors. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  27
    The Devil is in the Details: Confidentiality Challenges in the Age of Genetics.Barbara J. Daly, Ashley Rosko, Shulin Zhang & Hillard M. Lazarus - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (1):79-86.
    This clinical case report illustrates the potential dilemmas that can arise from knowledge gained through genetic analysis. These conflicts require careful ethical analysis of presumed duties to protect patient privacy and maintain confidentiality, the duty to warn a second party of a health risk, and the duty of veracity. While the questions raised by genetic testing of one individual for disease that reveals potentially important information about relatives, such as risk for Huntington chorea or breast cancer, have been discussed, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  20
    Is Genetic Information Family Property? Expanding on the Argument of Confidentiality Breach and Duty to Inform Persons at Risk.Yordanis Enríquez Canto & Barbara Osimani - 2015 - Persona y Bioética 19 (1).
    A current trend in bioethics considers genetic information as family property. This paper uses a logical approach to critically examine Matthew Liao’s proposal on the familial nature of genetic information as grounds for the duty to share it with relatives and for breach of confidentiality by the geneticist. The authors expand on the topic by examining the relationship between the arguments of probability and the familial nature of genetic information, as well as the concept of harm in the context (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  42
    PETs and Their Users: A Critical Review of the Potentials and Limitations of the Privacy as Confidentiality Paradigm. [REVIEW]Seda Gürses - 2010 - Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):539-563.
    “Privacy as confidentiality” has been the dominant paradigm in computer science privacy research. Privacy Enhancing Technologies that guarantee confidentiality of personal data or anonymous communication have resulted from such research. The objective of this paper is to show that such PETs are indispensable but are short of being the privacy solutions they sometimes claim to be given current day circumstances. Using perspectives from surveillance studies we will argue that the computer scientists’ conception of privacy through data or communication (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  31
    Neuroethics, Confidentiality, and a Cultural Imperative in Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: A Case Study with a First Nation Population.Shaun Stevenson, B. L. Beattie, Richard Vedan, Emily Dwosh, Lindsey Bruce & Judy Illes - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:15.
    The meaningful consideration of cultural practices, values and beliefs is a necessary component in the effective translation of advancements in neuroscience to clinical practice and public discourse. Society’s immense investment in biomedical science and technology, in conjunction with an increasingly diverse socio-cultural landscape, necessitates the study of how potential discoveries in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease are perceived and utilized across cultures. Building on the work of neuroscientists, ethicists and philosophers, we argue that the growing field of neuroethics provides (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Book Review: Privacy, Confidentiality, and Health Research, Written by William H. Lowrance. [REVIEW]Peter G. N. West-Oram - 2014 - European Journal of Health Law 21 (2): 233 – 237.
  22.  1
    Addressing the Conflict Between Partner Notification and Patient Confidentiality in Serodiscordant Relationships: How Can Ubuntu Help?Cornelius Ewuoso - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. A Defense of Unqualified Medical Confidentiality.Kenneth Kipnis - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):7 – 18.
    It is broadly held that confidentiality may be breached when doing so can avert grave harm to a third party. This essay challenges the conventional wisdom. Neither legal duties, personal morality nor personal values are sufficient to ground professional obligations. A methodology is developed drawing on core professional values, the nature of professions, and the justification for distinct professional obligations. Though doctors have a professional obligation to prevent public peril, they do not honor it by breaching confidentiality. It (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  24. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?K. L. Mandeville, M. Harris, H. L. Thomas, Y. Chow & C. Seng - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (1):47-50.
    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here a case from local level health protection where (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  25.  23
    Patients' Perception and Actual Practice of Informed Consent, Privacy and Confidentiality in General Medical Outpatient Departments of Two Tertiary Care Hospitals of Lahore.Ayesha Humayun, Noor Fatima, Shahid Naqqash, Salwa Hussain, Almas Rasheed, Huma Imtiaz & Sardar Imam - 2008 - BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):14-.
    BackgroundThe principles of informed consent, confidentiality and privacy are often neglected during patient care in developing countries. We assessed the degree to which doctors in Lahore adhere to these principles during outpatient consultations.Material & MethodThe study was conducted at medical out-patient departments (OPDs) of two tertiary care hospitals (one public and one private hospital) of Lahore, selected using multi-stage sampling. 93 patients were selected from each hospital. Doctors' adherence to the principles of informed consent, privacy and confidentiality was (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  26.  69
    The Betrayal of Research Confidentiality in British Sociology.John Lowman & Ted Palys - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (2):97-118.
    Research confidentiality in Britain is under attack. Indeed, in some quarters the ‘Law of the Land’ doctrine that absolutely subjugates research ethics to law is already a fait accompli. To illustrate the academic freedom issues at stake, the article discusses: (i) the Cambridge Psychology Research Ethics Committee’s ban of interview questions about a research participant’s involvement in criminal acts; (ii) the awarding of damages against Exeter University when it reneged on its agreement to uphold a doctoral student’s guarantee of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  34
    Biobanking, Consent, and Certificates of Confidentiality: Does the ANPRM Muddy the Water?Brett A. Williams & Leslie E. Wolf - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):440-453.
    In its Advanced Notice of Proposed Rule Making (ANPRM), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services proposed substantial changes to how biospecimen research is treated under the regulations governing human subjects research. Currently, much of this research can be conducted without consent because it may not be considered “human subjects” research, is considered exempt, or consent may be waived. Responding to criticisms that scientific changes have made biospecimen research riskier than contemplated when the Common Rule was last amended, the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  24
    The Utilitarian Argument for Medical Confidentiality: A Pilot Study of Patients' Views.C. Jones - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):348-352.
    Objectives: To develop and pilot a questionnaire based assessment of the importance patients place on medical confidentiality, whether they support disclosure of confidential information to protect third parties, and whether they consider that this would impair full disclosure in medical consultations.Design: Questionnaire administered to 30 consecutive patients attending a GP surgery.Results: Overall patients valued confidentiality, felt that other patients might be deterred from seeking treatment if it were not guaranteed, but did not think that they would withhold information (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  29.  73
    Confidentiality Decisions: The Reasoning Process of CPAS in Resolving Ethical Dilemmas. [REVIEW]Barbara L. Adams, Fannie L. Malone & Woodrow James - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (12):1015 - 1020.
    As in other professions, such as law and medicine, accounting has a Code of Professional Conduct (Code) that members are expected to abide by. In today''s legalistic society, however, the question of what is the right thing to do, is often confused with what is legal? In many instances, this may present a conflict between adhering to the Code and doing what some may perceive as proper ethical behavior. This paper examines (1) the reasoning process that CPAs use in resolving (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  30.  33
    Medical Confidentiality: An Intransigent and Absolute Obligation.M. H. Kottow - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (3):117-122.
    Clinicians' work depends on sincere and complete disclosures from their patients; they honour this candidness by confidentially safeguarding the information received. Breaching confidentiality causes harms that are not commensurable with the possible benefits gained. Limitations or exceptions put on confidentiality would destroy it, for the confider would become suspicious and un-co-operative, the confidant would become untrustworthy and the whole climate of the clinical encounter would suffer irreversible erosion. Excusing breaches of confidence on grounds of superior moral values introduces (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  31.  8
    Certificates of Confidentiality: Protecting Human Subject Research Data in Law and Practice.Leslie E. Wolf, Mayank J. Patel, Brett A. Williams Tarver, Jeffrey L. Austin, Lauren A. Dame & Laura M. Beskow - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):594-609.
    The federal Certificate of Confidentiality plays an important role in research on sensitive topics by authorizing researchers to refuse to disclose identifiable research data in response to subpoenas in any legal setting. However, there is little known about how effective Certificates are in practice. This article draws on our legal and empirical research on this topic to fill this information gap. It includes a description of the purpose of Certificates, their legislative and regulatory history, and a summary of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  30
    Breaching Confidentiality to Protect the Public: Evolving Standards of Medical Confidentiality for Military Detainees.Matthew K. Wynia* - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (8):1 – 5.
    Confidentiality is a core value in medicine and public health yet, like other core values, it is not absolute. Medical ethics has typically allowed for breaches of confidentiality when there is a credible threat of significant harm to an identifiable third party. Medical ethics has been less explicit in spelling out criteria for allowing breaches of confidentiality to protect populations, instead tending to defer these decisions to the law. But recently, issues in military detention settings have raised (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  33.  27
    Professional Ethics of Psychologists and Physicians: Mortality, Confidentiality, and Sexuality in Israel.Simon Shimshon Rubin & Omer Dror - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):213 – 238.
    Clinical psychologists' and nonpsychiatric physicians' attitudes and behaviors in sexual and confidentiality boundary violations were examined. The 171 participants' responses were analyzed by profession, sex, and status (student, resident, professional) on semantic differential, boundary violation vignettes, and a version of Pope, Tabachnick, and Keith-Spiegel's (1987) ethical scale. Psychologists rated sexual boundary violation as more unethical than did physicians (p<.001). Rationale (p<.01) and timing (p<.001) influenced ratings. Psychologists reported fewer sexualized behaviors than physicians (p<05). Professional experience (p<.01) and sex (p<.05) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  34.  20
    Do French Lay People and Health Professionals Find It Acceptable to Breach Confidentiality to Protect a Patient's Wife From a Sexually Transmitted Disease?M. Guedj - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (7):414-419.
    Objective: To determine under what conditions lay people and health professionals find it acceptable for a physician to breach confidentiality to protect the wife of a patient with a sexually transmitted disease .Methods: In a study in France, breaching confidentiality in 48 scenarios were accepted by 144 lay people, 10 psychologists and 7 physicians. The scenarios were all possible combinations of five factors: severity of the disease ; time taken to discuss this with ; intent to inform the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35.  19
    Consent and Confidentiality in Genetics: Whose Information is It Anyway?A. Kent - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):16-18.
    Against a background of increasing regulation regarding access to medical information and the presentation of patients' confidentiality, the case of genetic information raises interesting questions about whether the application of general rules is appropriate in all situations. Whilst all genetic information is not equally sensitive, some of it is highly predictive. It also allows deductions to be made about other family members. It may not be regarded as particularly sensitive when compared to other types of medical information and those (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36.  50
    Talking About Suicide: Confidentiality and Anonymity in Qualitative Research.S. Gibson, O. Benson & S. L. Brand - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012452684.
    While it is acknowledged that there is a need for more qualitative research on suicide, it is also clear that the ethics of undertaking such research need to be addressed. This article uses the case study of the authors’ experience of gaining ethics approval for a research project that asks people what it is like to feel suicidal to (a) analyse the limits of confidentiality and anonymity and (b) consider the ways in which the process of ethics review can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  13
    Familial Genetic Risks: How Can We Better Navigate Patient Confidentiality and Appropriate Risk Disclosure to Relatives?Edward S. Dove, Vicky Chico, Michael Fay, Graeme Laurie, Anneke M. Lucassen & Emily Postan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):504-507.
    This article investigates a high-profile and ongoing dilemma for healthcare professionals, namely whether the existence of a duty of care to genetic relatives of a patient is a help or a hindrance in deciding what to do in cases where a patient’s genetic information may have relevance to the health of the patient’s family members. The English case ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust and others considered if a duty of confidentiality owed to the patient and a putative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  17
    Confidentiality and the Ethics of Medical Ethics.W. A. Rogers - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):220-224.
    In this paper we consider the use of cases in medical ethics research and teaching. To date, there has been little discussion about the consent or confidentiality requirements that ought to govern the use of cases in these areas. This is in marked contrast to the requirements for consent to publish cases in clinical journals, or to use personal information in research. There are a number of reasons why it might be difficult to obtain consent to use cases in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39.  36
    The Efficacy of Accounts for a Breach of Confidentiality by Management.Robert A. Giacalone & Hinda Greyser Pollard - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):393 - 397.
    Management and non-management employees of a northeastern bank read a description of a manager who engaged in a breach of confidentiality. Subjects were asked to evaluate the acceptability of 27 excuses. Results showed that subjects' ratings of acceptability were affected by their individual perception of the severity of the stimulus manager's breach of confidentiality. Subjects' rank did not affect acceptability of accounts.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  40.  29
    Confidentiality in End-of-Life and After-Death Situations.Rebekah J. Bardash, Caroline Burke & James L. Werth - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):205-222.
    Confidentiality is one of the foundations on which psychotherapy is built. Limitations on confidentiality in the therapeutic process have been explained and explored by many authors and organizations. However, controversy and confusion continue to exist with regard to the limitations on confidentiality in situations where clients are considering their options at the end of life and after a client has died. This article reviews these 2 areas and provides some suggestions for future research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  16
    HIV/AIDS Clients, Privacy and Confidentiality; the Case of Two Health Centres in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.Jonathan Mensah Dapaah & Kodjo A. Senah - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):41.
    BackgroundWhile most studies on HIV/AIDS often identify stigmatization and patients’ unwillingness to access health care as critical problems in the control of the pandemic, very few studies have focused on the possible consequences of accessing health care by sero-positives. This paper examines the socio-psychological trauma patients experience in their desire to access health care in two health facilities in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.MethodsThrough participant observation, informal conversation and in-depth interviews, data were collected from health workers and clients of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  21
    Breaking Confidentiality to Report Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior by School Psychologists.William A. Rae, Jeremy R. Sullivan, Nancy Peña Razo & Roman Garcia de Alba - 2009 - Ethics and Behavior 19 (6):449-460.
    School psychologists often break confidentiality if confronted with risky adolescent behavior. Members of the National Association of School Psychologists ( N = 78) responded to a survey containing a vignette describing an adolescent engaging in risky behaviors and rated the degree to which it is ethical to break confidentiality for behaviors of varying frequency, intensity, and duration. Respondents generally found it ethical to break confidentiality when risky adolescent behaviors became more dangerous or potentially harmful, although there was (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43.  16
    Perceptions of the Limitations of Confidentiality Among Chinese Mental Health Practitioners, Adolescents and Their Parents.Marcus A. Rodriguez, Caitlin M. Fang, Jun Gao, Clive Robins & M. Zachary Rosenthal - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (4):344-356.
    The present study aims to survey Chinese mental health professionals’ attitudes toward therapeutic confidentiality with adolescent patients in specific clinical situations, and compare Chinese adolescents’ and parents’ beliefs about when most mental health professionals would breach confidentiality. A sample of 36 mental health practitioners, 152 parents, and 164 adolescents completed a survey to assess their opinions about when confidentiality should be breached in 18 specific clinical situations. Nearly half of the parents and adolescents and 78% of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  23
    Endorsement of Managers Following Accusations of Breaches in Confidentiality.Robert Giacalone, Stephen L. Payne & Paul Rosenfeld - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):621 - 629.
    Two related studies focused on the effects that a questionable supervisory conduct has on the endorsement and vulnerability of the supervisor, as well as on judgments of supervisory morality. Male and female undergraduate and graduate business students were asked to read the account of a personnel manager who violates employee confidentiality concerning certain personality test results, but who has had a previous record of increasing or decreasing productivity. The studies revealed varying patterns of leadership endorsement, vulnerability, and judgments of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  45.  7
    Confidentiality Breaches in Clinical Practice: What Happens in Hospitals?Cristina M. Beltran-Aroca, Eloy Girela-Lopez, Eliseo Collazo-Chao, Manuel Montero-Pérez-Barquero & Maria C. Muñoz-Villanueva - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):52.
    BackgroundRespect for confidentiality is important to safeguard the well-being of patients and ensure the confidence of society in the doctor-patient relationship. The aim of our study is to examine real situations in which there has been a breach of confidentiality, by means of direct observation in clinical practice.MethodsBy means of direct observation, our study examines real situations in which there has been a breach of confidentiality in a tertiary hospital. To observe and collect data on these situations, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  22
    Exploring the Ethics of Forewarning: Social Workers, Confidentiality and Potential Child Abuse Disclosures.Helen McLaren - 2007 - Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (1):22-40.
    This article reports on exploratory research into social workers? perceptions and actions regarding ?forewarning? clients of their child abuse reporting obligations as a limitation of confidentiality at relationship onset. Ethical principles and previous research on forewarning are discussed prior to stating the research methods and presenting findings. Data obtained from South Australian social workers engaged in human service work with adult family members articulate a strong desire to practise in accordance with professional codes of ethics. However, the findings suggest (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  29
    The Inter-Role Confidentiality Conflict in Recruitment for Clinical Research.Marwan Habiba & Martyn Evans - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (5):565 – 587.
    Recruiting patients into clinical research is essential for the advancement of medical knowledge. However, when the physician undertaking the care of the patient is also responsible for recruitment into clinical research, a situation arises of an inter-role breach of confidentiality which is distinguishable from other conflicts of interest. Such discord arises as the physician utilizes confidential information obtained within the therapeutic relationship beyond its primary objective, and safeguards ought to be observed in order to avert this important, and generally (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48.  27
    Ethical Dilemmas of Confidentiality With Adolescent Clients: Case Studies From Psychologists.Rony E. Duncan, Annette C. Hall & Ann Knowles - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (3):197-221.
    Navigating limits to confidentiality with adolescent clients can be ethically and professionally challenging. This study follows on from a previous quantitative survey of psychologists about confidentiality dilemmas with adolescents. The current study used qualitative methods to explore such dilemmas in greater depth. Twenty Australian psychologists were interviewed and asked to describe an ethically challenging past case. Cases were then used to facilitate discussion about the decision-making process and outcomes. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using interpretive content and thematic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  9
    Confidentiality and the Duties of Care.J. O'Brien - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):36-40.
    Doctors have an ethical and legal duty to respect patient confidentiality. We consider the basis for this duty, looking particularly at the meaning and value of autonomy in health care. Enabling patients to decide how information about them is disclosed is an important element in autonomy and helps patients engage as active partners in their care.Good quality data is, however, essential for research, education, public health monitoring, and for many other activities essential to provision of health care. We discuss (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  21
    The Balancing Act—Ethical Issues in Parent Training Research: Confidentiality, Harm Reduction, and Methodology.Sharonne D. Herbert, Elizabeth A. Harvey & Richard P. Halgin - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (3):222-232.
    Attention and disruptive behavior disorders present considerable challenges for children and their parents. These challenges have led to the development of parenting programs; however, there is a paucity of literature that discusses the ethical dilemmas parent training researchers face. This article reviews ethical principles and professional standards relevant to parent training research and provides case material to illustrate the challenge of balancing ethical adherence and empirical rigor using three ethical issues that commonly arise in parent training research. In particular, this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 806