Results for 'confucianism'

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  1. 儒家思想与中国传统文化的价值优先观(Confucianism and the Value Priority in Traditional Chinese Culture).Keqian Xu - 2009 - 孔子研究 Confucius Studies 2009 (2):22-27.
    Confucianism has a deep influence on the opinion of value priority in traditional Chinese culture, which consider the value of morality prior to that of utility; the value of moral merit prior to that of intelligent; the value of group prior to that of individuals; the value of peace and safety prior to that of freedom and liberty; the value of harmony prior to that of conflict. This kind of value priority has performed very important and positive functions in (...)
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  2.  42
    Democracy Without Autonomy: Moral and Personal Autonomy in Democratic Confucianism.Yvonne Chiu - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):47-60.
    The presence and absence of autonomy in Joseph Chan’s democratic Confucianism loom large, but not always in the ways that he maintains. Although Chan claims that his reconstruction of Confucianism for modern democracy can accept some forms of moral autonomy, what he presents does not constitute genuine moral autonomy, and the absence of that autonomy sits in tension with some other aspects of his model. When it comes to personal autonomy, it is the opposite: Chan says that the (...)
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  3. Is Confucianism Good for Business Ethics in China?Po Keung Ip - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):463-476.
    This article examines whether and to what extent Confucianism as a resilient Chinese cultural tradition can be used as a sound basis of business practice and management model for Chinese corporations in the twenty-first century. Using the core elements of Confucianism, the article constructs a notion of a Confucian Firm with its concepts of the moral person ( Junzi ), core human morality ( ren, yi, li ) and relationships ( guanxi ), as well as benign social structure (...)
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  4. Confucianism, Buddhism, and Virtue Ethics.Bradford Cokelet - 2016 - European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):187-214.
    Are Confucian and Buddhist ethical views closer to Kantian, Consequentialist, or Virtue Ethical ones? And how can such comparisons shed light on the unique aspects of Confucian and Buddhist views? This essay (i) provides a historically grounded framework for distinguishing western views, (ii) identifies a series of questions that we can ask in order to clarify the philosophic accounts of ethical motivation embedded in the Buddhist and Confucian traditions, and (iii) then critiques Lee Ming-huei’s claim that Confucianism is closer (...)
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  5.  86
    Han Feizi's Criticism of Confucianism and its Implications for Virtue Ethics.Eric Hutton - 2008 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):423-453.
    Several scholars have recently proposed that Confucianism should be regarded as a form of virtue ethics. This view offers new approaches to understanding not only Confucian thinkers, but also their critics within the Chinese tradition. For if Confucianism is a form of virtue ethics, we can then ask to what extent Chinese criticisms of it parallel criticisms launched against contemporary virtue ethics, and what lessons for virtue ethics in general might be gleaned from the challenges to Confucianism (...)
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  6.  23
    Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - Polity.
    This book provides an accessible introduction to the main perspectives and topics being debated today, and shows why Progressive Confucianism is a particularly promising approach.
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  7. Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism.David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):473-482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study (...)
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  8.  59
    Why Early Confucianism Cannot Generate Democracy.David Elstein - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):427-443.
    A central issue in Chinese philosophy today is the relationship between Confucianism and democracy. While some political figures have argued that Confucian values justify non-democratic forms of government, many scholars have argued that Confucianism can provide justification for democracy, though this Confucian democracy will differ substantially from liberal democracy. These scholars believe it is important for Chinese culture to develop its own conception of democracy using Confucian values, drawn mainly from Kongzi (Confucius) and Mengzi (Mencius), as the basis. (...)
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  9.  67
    Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Jen and Agape.Xinzhong Yao - 1996 - Distributed in the U.S. By International Specialized Bk. Services.
    The underlying idea presented in this book is that there are similarities as well as differences between Confucianism as Humanistic tradition and Christianity ...
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  10.  30
    Why is Confucianism Not a Religion? The Impact of Orientalism.Chen Na - 2016 - Zygon 51 (1):21-42.
    This study attempts to answer the question why Confucianism, the dominant “teaching” among the Three Teachings, is not a religion in contemporary China, unlike the other two “teachings,” Buddhism and Daoism. By examining this phenomenon in the social-historical context, this study finds its origin in Orientalism. The Orientalist conceptualization of religion became part of the New Culture discourse at the turn of the twentieth century. While China has undergone tremendous social changes over the past century, the old discourse remains.
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  11.  58
    Traditional Confucianism in Modern China: Ma Yifu's Ethical Thought.Wenhua Chai - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):366-381.
    Modem neo-Confucianism is studied at two levels, one is at the historical level and the other at the academic level. Modern neo-Confucianism at the historical level was developed in the modern context, but its basic content belongs to the traditional Confucianism or the study of Confucian classics. Modem neo-Confucianism at the academic level recognizes both the deficiencies of the traditional Confucianism and rationality of western learning, and dedicates itself to the modernization of Confucianism. Though (...)
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  12.  49
    Confucianism and the Idea of Equality.A. T. Nuyen - 2001 - Asian Philosophy 11 (2):61 – 71.
    It is often supposed that Confucianism is opposed to the idea of equality insofar as the key ideals to which it is committed, such as meritocracy and li , are incompatible with equality. Sympathetic commentators typically defend Confucianism by saying that (a) the Confucian person is not a free-standing individual but a social being embedded in a social structure with different and unequal roles, and (b) social inequality has to be traded in for other values. This paper argues (...)
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  13.  27
    Science and Confucianism in Retrospect and Prospect.Hsu Kuang‐Tai - 2016 - Zygon 51 (1):86-99.
    In contrast to Western science and religion, a topic which has been studied very much since the twentieth century, less research has been done on science and Confucianism. By way of a comparative viewpoint within the history of science, this article will deal with some aspects of science and Confucianism in retrospect, for instance, the Confucian origin of the idea of tian yuan di fang 天圓地方, the natural philosophy of qi, and the wu xing li tian zhi qi (...)
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  14.  36
    On The Universal and Local Aspects of Confucianism.Lai Chen - 2005 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):79-91.
    To counter the tendency of making Confucianism "localized" and thereby turning Confucianism research into research of local social history, the author criticizes this tendency and thinks it is unilateral to emphasize or stress the importance of a small unit's locality, but ignore the oneness of the distribution of Confucianism and the universality of Confucian thought. The thesis emphasizes that the main schools of Confucianism in the Song and Ming Dynasties are all not local ones and cannot (...)
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  15.  62
    The “Manifesto” of New-Confucianism and the Revival of Virtue Ethics.Jiyuan Yu - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):317-334.
    In 1958, a group of New-Confucians issued “A Manifesto for a Re-Appraisal of Sinology and Reconstruction of Chinese Culture.” Equally in 1958, the British philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe published her classical paper “Modern Moral Philosophy.” These two papers have the same target — modern Western morality — and the solutions they proposed respectively. Yet Anscombe’s paper did not mention Confucianism, and the “Manifesto” ignored Aristotelian tradition of virtue. Furthermore, from 1960s to 1990s, the revival movement of Confucianism and the (...)
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  16. Confucianism and Modernization: Industrialization and Democratization of the Confucian Regions.Wei-Bin Zhang - 1999 - St. Martin's Press.
    Wei-Bin Zhang offers an authoritative guide to the philosophy of Confucian regions, covering mainland China Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao, Japan, South Korea, North Korea, Vietnam, and Singapore. All, except Singapore, employed Confucianism as the state ideology before the West came to East Asia. The differences and similarities between the variety of Confucian schools are examined. The author concludes that the philosophical and ethical principles of Confucianism will assist in the industrialization and democratization of the region.
     
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  17.  56
    A Weakness in Confucianism: Private and Public Moralities.Dahua Cui - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (4):517-532.
    In a society dominated by Confucian ethics, a spirit of Confucian public morality can be seen in the Confucian debate over publicness and privateness, but it is usually activated in circumstances of large ethical crisis. Confucian theory mainly uses ethical relationships to create self and social identities, causing problems of identification in the public life and hindering the expression of moral feelings and actions, thus revealing a weakness in public morality. This is a space that Confucianism has not yet (...)
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  18.  16
    The "Manifesto" of New-Confucianism and the Revival of Virtue Ethics.Yu Jiyuan & Lei Yongqiang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):317 - 334.
    In 1958, a group of New-Confucians issued "A Manifesto for a Re-Appraisal of Sinology and Reconstruction of Chinese Culture." Equally in 1958, the British philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe published her classical paper "Modern Moral Philosophy." These two papers have the same target — modern Western morality — and the solutions they proposed respectively. Yet Anscombe's paper did not mention Confucianism, and the "Manifesto" ignored Aristotelian tradition of virtue. Furthermore, from 1960s to 1990s, the revival movement of Confucianism and the (...)
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  19.  22
    Return to Life and Reconstruct Confucianism: An Outline of Comparative Study on Confucianism and Phenomenology.Yushun Huang - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3):454-473.
    Confucianism can be analyzed at three levels of ideas: life as existence (Sein) itself; the Confucian metaphysics about metaphysical beings; and the Confucian doctrines about tangible existences. In the eyes of Confucians, life itself is displayed as the feeling of benevolence in the first place. To reconstruct Confucianism is to return to life and perceive it as a fundamental source. That means to historically return to the original Confucianism during and even before the Axial Period, in essence (...)
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  20.  20
    Early Confucianism is a System for Social-Functional Influence and Probably Does Not Represent a Normative Ethical Theory.Ryan Nichols - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):499-520.
    To the question “What normative ethical theory does early Confucianism best represent?” researchers in the history of early Confucian philosophy respond with more than half a dozen different answers. They include sentimentalism, amoralism, pragmatism, Kantianism, Aristotelian virtue theory, care ethics, and role ethics. The lack of consensus is concerning, as three considerations make clear. First, fully trained, often leading, scholars advocate each of the theories. Second, nearly all participants in the debate believe that the central feature of early (...) is its moral thought. However, these normative ethical theories are logically inconsistent with one another, the third point. The entailment is unavoidable: the majority of scholars of early Confucian normative ethics must be incorrect about their attributions of a normative theory to early Confucianism. It would appear, then, that we need a new dao 道 or pathway for the study of early Confucian moral thought. One alternative is to adopt an immersively interdisciplinary research methodology that pivots on the recognition that early Confucianism is a social-functional system the governing purpose of which is to influence cultural leaders. (shrink)
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  21.  32
    Achievements, Predicaments and Trend of Moral Confucianism.Zhiming Song - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (4):503-516.
    Beginning with the promotion of morality in Confucianism, a Neo-Confucian movement in modern Chinese philosophy was initiated, in which Confucianism underwent a transition from tradition to modernity. However, Moral Confucianism did not successfully develop the “new kingliness without” from its “sageliness within,” respond to modernization marked by science and democracy, and provide moral impetus for the development of a modern Chinese society or appeal to many beyond the small circle of “elite Confucianists.” The fundamental reason is that (...)
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  22.  20
    An Exposition of Zhou Yi Studies in Modern Neo-Confucianism.Qiyong Guo - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):185-203.
    The representatives of modern Neo-Confucianism all greatly value Yi Zhuan and regard it as one of their spiritual resources, and give their own creative interpretations and transformations. Xiong Shili's ontological-cosmological theory takes "qian yuan" as its center; Ma Yifu has a theory of ontology-cultivation centered on "nature-principle"; Fang Dongmei has a metaphysics of production and reproduction; Mou Zongsan takes the view of "completely knowing the fathomless and understanding transformation" as a moral metaphysics; and in Tang Junyi there is a (...)
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  23.  31
    Political Thought in Early Confucianism.Tao Liang - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):212-236.
    The political philosophy of early Confucianism mainly focuses on the “ shi ± (scholar).” It is built on ideas such as that of “establishing a ruler in consideration of the people,” “taking yi 义 (righteousness) as li 利 (benefit)” and “following the Dao but not the ruler,” which demonstrate the foundations of political legitimacy, justice as a political principle, and principles of a scholar to become an official. Although the political thought of early Confucianism has its historical limitations, (...)
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  24.  31
    A Reconstruction of Contemporary Confucianism as a Form of Knowledge.Xiangjun Li - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):561-571.
    Traditional Confucianism might be likened to a great tree, with various branches and trends of thought emerging from common roots. Continuing with this metaphor, Confucianism as a form of knowledge might be regarded as a main branch, and the resulting form of Confucianism constitutes the main body of Chinese learning. Due to modern society's transformation, Confucianism as a form of knowledge has begun to disappear and the form of Confucianism which has its own discourse system (...)
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  25.  45
    Confucianism and Human Rights.Justin Tiwald - 2011 - In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. pp. 244.
    One of the most high-profile debates in Chinese philosophy concerns the compatibility of human and individual rights with basic Confucian doctrines and practices. Defenders of the incompatibilist view argue that rights are inconsistent with Confucianism because rights are (necessarily) role-independent obligations and entitlements, whereas Confucians think that all obligations and entitlements are role-dependent. Two other arguments have to do with the practice of claiming one's own rights, holding (a) that claiming one's rights undercuts family-like community bonds and (b) that (...)
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  26.  27
    Confucianism and Tokugawa Culture.Peter Nosco (ed.) - 1997 - University of Hawai'i Press.
    ONE INTRODUCTION: NEO-CONFUCIANISM AND TOKUGAWA DISCOURSE BY PETER NOSCO Modern scholarship on the intellectual history of the Tokugawa period ...
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  27.  11
    Transformative Critique: What Confucianism Can Contribute to Contemporary Education.Geir Sigurðsson - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):131-146.
    Critical thinking is currently much celebrated in the contemporary West and beyond, not least in higher education. Tertiary education students are generally expected to adopt a critical attitude in order to become responsible and constructive participants in the development of modern democratic society. Currently, the perceived desirability of critical thinking has even made it into a seemingly successful marketable commodity. A brief online search yields a vast number of books that are mostly presented as self-help manuals to enable readers to (...)
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  28.  38
    Zhu Xi's Choice, Historical Criticism and Influence—An Analysis of Zhu Xi's Relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism.Weixiang Ding - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):521-548.
    As a great synthesist for the School of Principles of the Northern and Southern Song dynasties, Zhu Xi’s influence over the School of Principles was demonstrated not only through his positive theoretical creation, but also through his choice and critical awareness. Zhu’s relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism is a typical case; and his activities, ranging from his research of Buddhism (the Chan School) in his early days to his farewell to the Chan School as a student of Li Dong (...)
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  29.  11
    Political Confucianism and the Politics of Confucian Studies.Eske J. Møllgaard - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):391-402.
    Through the 1980s Confucian studies in the United States tended to present Confucianism as compatible with liberal democratic values. Since the 1990s, after the rise of China as a global power, Confucianism is increasingly defended as a political alternative to liberal and democratic values. This essay argues that Confucianism is not compatible with liberal democratic values, and that the rise of political Confucianism opposed to liberal democracy is a return to a more authentic Confucianism. Furthermore, (...)
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  30.  17
    Is Confucianism a Source of Corruption in Chinese Society? A New Round of Debate in Mainland China.Tangjia Wang - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (1):111-121.
    The debate on whether Confucianism is a source of corruption or root of morality, which initiated about ten years ago in China and was mainly between Liu Qingping 劉清平 and Guo Qiyong 郭齊勇, entered a second stage when Deng Xiaomang 鄧曉芒 criticized Confucian ethics based on filial piety, and Guo Qiyong and (mainly) his (former) students persistently defended their points of view. This essay is a review of the main theme of the debate at this second stage.
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  31.  35
    Way of Post-Confucianism: Transformation and Genealogy. [REVIEW]Huang Zhuoyue - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):543-559.
    After Neo-Confucianism, the study of contemporary Confucianism became more diverse. Its original uniformity was replaced by diversity. During this time, however, Post-Confucianism became increasingly prominent. Post-Confucianism comes from a post-modernist context and was influenced by a post-modernist ideological mode, and so its appearance was inevitable. It was also closely linked to significant philosophical issues after the change in times, and therefore questioned and challenged Neo-Confucianism which was based on a pattern of modernity. Post-Confucianism represents (...)
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  32.  38
    New Confucianism: A Critical Examination, Edited by John Makeham. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):535–540.
    This collection of essays explores the development of the New Confucianism movement during the 20th century and questions whether it is, in fact, a distinctly new intellectual movement or one that has been mostly retrospectively created. The questions that contributors to this book seek to answer about this neo-conservative philosophical movement include: “What has been the cross-fertilization between Chinese scholars in China and overseas made possible by the shared discourse of Confucianism?” “To what extent does this discourse transcend (...)
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  33.  34
    Aesthetic Judgment: The Power of the Mind in Understanding Confucianism[REVIEW]Xialing Xie - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):38-51.
    Mou Zongsan incorrectly uses Kant’s practical reason to interpret Confucianism. The saying that “what is it that we have in common in our minds? It is the li 理 (principles) and the yi 义 (righteousness)” reveals how Mencius explains the origin of li and yi through a theory of common sense. In “the li and the yi please our minds, just as the flesh of beef and mutton and pork please our mouths,” “please” is used twice, proving aesthetic judgment (...)
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  34.  27
    A Qigong Interpretation of Confucianism.Peimin Ni - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (1):79-97.
    Against the overly intellectualistic reading of Confucianism, this paper argues for understanding Confucianism from the perspective of qigong (or gongfu) cultivation that aims at increasing the abilities to lead a good life.
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    The Contemporary Significance of Confucianism.Yijie Tang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):477-501.
    As we enter the new millennium, it has become more important to review and discover ancient wisdom. The project to build a harmonious society requires us to know our own “culture.” The biggest conflicts we human beings face are the conflicts between man and nature, man and man (man and society), and body and mind. The three philosophical propositions, “the unity of Heaven and man,” “the unity of self and others,” and “the unity of body and mind” of Confucianism (...)
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    The Formation, Development and Evolution of Neo-Confucianism — with a Focus on the Doctrine of “Stilling the Nature” in the Song Period.Renqiu Zhu - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):322-342.
    The formation of the discourse of Neo-Confucianism 1 in the Song period was a result of the interactions between many social and cultural trends. In the development of the Neo-Confucian discourse, the Cheng brothers (Cheng Hao and Cheng Yi) played key roles with their charismatic thoughts and impelling personalities, while Zhu Xi pushed Neo-Confucian thought and discourse to a pinnacle with his broad knowledge and precise reasoning. In the warm discussions and debates between different schools and thoughts, the Neo-Confucian (...)
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  37.  25
    On “Viewing Things” and “Viewing Nothing”: A Dialogue Between Confucianism and Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Yushun Huang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (2):177-193.
    In traditional Chinese expressions, guannian 观念 (ideas) are results of guan 观 (viewing). However, viewing can be understood to have two different levels of meanings: one is “viewing things,” that is, viewing with something to view; another is “viewing nothing,” that is, viewing with nothing to view. What are viewed in “viewing things” are either physical beings—all existing things and phenomena—or the metaphysical being (for example, the “Dao as a thing”). In both cases, something is being viewed. What is viewed (...)
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  38.  7
    Rethinking Reconstructionist Confucianism's Rethinking.Lauren F. Pfister - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):395-401.
    In this review of Fan Ruiping’s book, I am concerned first of all about how representative his account of Confucianism/Ruism is in relationship to the multiform traditions associated with that teaching through more than two thousand years of its existence. Fan emphasizes pre-imperial forms of Confucian traditions, but neglects many alternatives from later sources. Secondly, his account of “familism” lends itself to questions related to the problem of revenge that is associated with traditional Confucianism. This raises further ethical (...)
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  39.  6
    The Environmental Ethics of Fan Ruiping's Revisionist Confucianism.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):403-406.
    Fan Ruiping is engaged in a wide-ranging project to reconstruct Confucianism for the contemporary period. It includes his sustained attack on John Rawls’ theory of distributive justice, various Chinese policies and practices on the delivery of health and elder care, and global business ethics. This paper describes his revised Confucian understanding of environmental morality under the metaphor of nature as garden and man as gardener. I argue the current state of this effort is in need of a more robust (...)
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  40.  9
    Aesthetic Judgment: The Power of the Mind in Understanding Confucianism.Xie Xialing & Gao Limin - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):38 - 51.
    Mou Zongsan incorrectly uses Kant's practical reason to interpret Confucianism. The saying that "what is it that we have in common in our minds? It is the il 理 (principles) and the yi 义 (righteousness)" reveals how Mencius explains the origin of il and yi through a theory of common sense. In "the li and the yi please our minds, just as the flesh of beef and mutton and pork please our mouths," "please" is used twice, proving aesthetic judgment (...)
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  41.  21
    Confucianism: An Introduction.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2010 - I.B. Tauris.
    "China has 'arrived,' and Ronnie Littlejohn helps us know this antique culture better. In his entirely accessible introduction, Littlejohn has done the academy the timely service of resourcing the best contemporary research in sinology to tell the compelling story of a living Confucianism as it has meandered through the dynasties to flow down to our present time." -- Roger T. Ames, Professor of Philosophy, University of Hawai’i "Although basically intended as an introductory text for undergraduates, this book is equally (...)
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  42.  8
    Teaching Confucianism.Jeffrey L. Richey (ed.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,' teachers and scholars of religious studies and theology will be (...)
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  43.  23
    Confucianism and Spiritual Traditions in Modern China and Beyond.Fenggang Yang & Joseph B. Tamney (eds.) - 2011 - Brill.
    This multidisciplinary volume includes philosophical and theological articulations of Confucianism and other spiritual traditions for the modern and globalizing world, and empirical studies of and analytical reflections on Confucianism and ...
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  44. The Ways of Confucianism Investigations in Chinese Philosophy.David S. Nivison & Bryan W. Van Norden - 1996
     
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  45.  11
    Boston Confucianism: Portable Tradition in the Late-Modern World.Robert C. Neville - 2000 - State University of New York Press.
    Promoting multiculturalism through renewed East-West and Confucian-Christian dialogue, Neville (philosophy, religion, and theology, Boston U.) fosters the idea ...
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  46.  25
    Confucius and Confucianism: The Essentials.Lee Dian Rainey - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    These are carefully placed in the context of Chinese society, demonstrating how Confucius responded to the conflicts and pressures of his time and offered ...
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  47. The Sage and the Second Sex Confucianism, Ethics, and Gender.Chenyang Li - 2000
     
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    Confucianism, Democracy, and the Virtue of Deference.Aaron Stalnaker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):441-459.
    Some democratic theorists have argued that contemporary people should practice only a civility that recognizes others as equal persons, and eschew any form of deference to authority as a feudalistic cultural holdover that ought to be abandoned in the modern era. Against such views, this essay engages early Confucian views of ethics and society, including their analyses of different sorts of authority and status, in order to argue that, properly understood, deference is indeed a virtue of considerable importance for contemporary (...)
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    The Unlikely Buddhologist: Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism.Jason Clower - 2010 - Brill.
    This highly accessible book provides a comprehensive unpacking and interpretation, suitable for students and scholars in all fields, of towering philosopher Mou ...
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  50. Neo-Confucianism in History.Peter Kees Bol - 2008 - Harvard University Press.
     
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