Results for 'conscientious objection'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  97
    Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis.Mark R. Wicclair - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historically associated with military service, conscientious objection has become a significant phenomenon in health care. Mark Wicclair offers a comprehensive ethical analysis of conscientious objection in three representative health care professions: medicine, nursing and pharmacy. He critically examines two extreme positions: the 'incompatibility thesis', that it is contrary to the professional obligations of practitioners to refuse provision of any service within the scope of their professional competence; and 'conscience absolutism', that they should be exempted from performing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  2. Conscientious Objection and Emergency Contraception.Robert F. Card - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):8 – 14.
    This article argues that practitioners have a professional ethical obligation to dispense emergency contraception, even given conscientious objection to this treatment. This recent controversy affects all medical professionals, including physicians as well as pharmacists. This article begins by analyzing the option of referring the patient to another willing provider. Objecting professionals may conscientiously refuse because they consider emergency contraception to be equivalent to abortion or because they believe contraception itself is immoral. This article critically evaluates these reasons and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  3. Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-21.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  12
    Conscientious Objection and Systemic Injustice.Michal Pruski - 2020 - Clinical Ethics (3):147775092090345.
    This paper follows on from a brief debate about the role of conscientious objection in healthcare, where the issue arose as to whether conscientious objection is (or can) be a tool of resistance against systemic injustice. The paper contributes to this debate by highlighting that some authors generally opposed to conscientious objection in healthcare have shown some support to this idea. Perhaps if there is one area in which all can agree, it is that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with a Physician’s Professional Obligations.Mark R. Wicclair - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):171--185.
    In response to physicians who refuse to provide medical services that are contrary to their ethical and/or religious beliefs, it is sometimes asserted that anyone who is not willing to provide legally and professionally permitted medical services should choose another profession. This article critically examines the underlying assumption that conscientious objection is incompatible with a physician’s professional obligations (the “incompatibility thesis”). Several accounts of the professional obligations of physicians are explored: general ethical theories (consequentialism, contractarianism, and rights-based theories), (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  6.  60
    Conscientious Objection to Referrals for Abortion: Pragmatic Solution or Threat to Women’s Rights?Eva M. K. Nordberg, Helge Skirbekk & Morten Magelssen - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):15.
    Conscientious objection has spurred impassioned debate in many Western countries. Some Norwegian general practitioners (GPs) refuse to refer for abortion. Little is know about how the GPs carry out their refusals in practice, how they perceive their refusal to fit with their role as professionals, and how refusals impact patients. Empirical data can inform subsequent normative analysis.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7.  21
    Conscientious Objection to Intentional Killing: An Argument for Toleration.Bjørn K. Myskja & Morten Magelssen - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):82.
    In the debate on conscientious objection in healthcare, proponents of conscience rights often point to the imperative to protect the health professional’s moral integrity. Their opponents hold that the moral integrity argument alone can at most justify accommodation of conscientious objectors as a “moral courtesy”, as the argument is insufficient to establish a general moral right to accommodation, let alone a legal right. This text draws on political philosophy in order to argue for a legal right to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  8.  25
    Conscientious Objection, Professional Duty and Compromise: A Response to Savulescu and Schuklenk.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):126-131.
    In a recent article in this journal, Savulescu and Schuklenk defend and extend their earlier arguments against a right to medical conscientious objection in response to criticisms raised by Cowley. I argue that while it would be preferable to be less accommodating of medical conscientious than many countries currently are, Savulescu and Schuklenk's argument that conscientious objection is ‘simply unprofessional’ is mistaken. The professional duties of doctors should be defined in relation to the interests of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  42
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare Provision: A New Dimension.Peter West-Oram & Alena Buyx - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (5):336-343.
    The right to conscientious objection in the provision of healthcare is the subject of a lengthy, heated and controversial debate. Recently, a new dimension was added to this debate by the US Supreme Court's decision in Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby et al. which effectively granted rights to freedom of conscience to private, for-profit corporations. In light of this paradigm shift, we examine one of the most contentious points within this debate, the impact of granting conscience exemptions to healthcare (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10.  42
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare Provision: A New Dimension.Peter West-Oram & Alena Buyx - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):336-343.
    The right to conscientious objection in the provision of healthcare is the subject of a lengthy, heated and controversial debate. Recently, a new dimension was added to this debate by the US Supreme Court's decision in Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby et al. which effectively granted rights to freedom of conscience to private, for-profit corporations. In light of this paradigm shift, we examine one of the most contentious points within this debate, the impact of granting conscience exemptions to healthcare (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  11. The Paradox of Conscientious Objection and the Anemic Concept of 'Conscience': Downplaying the Role of Moral Integrity in Health Care.Alberto Giubilini - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):159-185.
    Conscientious objection in health care is a form of compromise whereby health care practitioners can refuse to take part in safe, legal, and beneficial medical procedures to which they have a moral opposition (for instance abortion). Arguments in defense of conscientious objection in medicine are usually based on the value of respect for the moral integrity of practitioners. I will show that philosophical arguments in defense of conscientious objection based on respect for such moral (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  12.  87
    Conscientious Objection, Emergency Contraception, and Public Policy.Robert F. Card - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):53-68.
    Defenders of medical professionals’ rights to conscientious objection (CO) regarding emergency contraception (EC) draw an analogy to CO in the military. Such professionals object to EC since it has the possibility of harming zygotic life, yet if we accept this analogy and utilize jurisprudence to frame the associated public policy, those who refuse to dispense EC would not have their objection honored. Legal precedent holds that one must consistently object to all forms of the relevant activity. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  13.  60
    No Conscientious Objection Without Normative Justification: Against Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Benjamin Zolf - 2018 - Bioethics 33 (1):146-153.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  30
    Managing Conscientious Objection in Health Care Institutions.Mark R. Wicclair - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (3):267-283.
    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient’s/surrogate’s timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15. Conscientious Objection to Vaccination.Steve Clarke, Alberto Giubilini & Mary Jean Walker - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):155-161.
    Vaccine refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. In this article we examine vaccine refusals that are made on conscientious grounds; that is, for religious, moral, or philosophical reasons. We focus on two questions: first, whether people should be entitled to conscientiously object to vaccination against contagious diseases ; second, if so, to what constraints or requirements should conscientious objection to vaccination be subject. To address these questions, we consider an analogy between CO to vaccination and CO (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  21
    Conscientious Objection in Medical Students: A Questionnaire Survey.Sophie L. M. Strickland - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):22-25.
    Objective To explore attitudes towards conscientious objections among medical students in the UK. Methods Medical students at St George's University of London, Cardiff University, King's College London and Leeds University were emailed a link to an anonymous online questionnaire, hosted by an online survey company. The questionnaire contained nine questions. A total of 733 medical students responded. Results Nearly half of the students in this survey stated that they believed in the right of doctors to conscientiously object to any (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  17.  19
    No Conscientious Objection Without Normative Justification: A Reply.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (4):522-523.
    Benjamin Zolf, in his recent paper ‘No conscientious objection without normative justification: Against conscientious objection in medicine’, attempts to establish that in order to rule out arbitrary conscientious objections, a reasonability constraint is necessary. This, he contends, requires normative justification, and the subjective beliefs that ground conscientious objections cannot easily be judged by normative criteria. Zolf shows that the alternative of using extrinsic criteria, such as requiring that unjustified harm must not be caused, are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  24
    Conscientious Objection to Abortion, the Law and its Implementation in Victoria, Australia: Perspectives of Abortion Service Providers.Lynn Gillam Louise Anne Keogh, Kathleen McNamee Marie Bismark, Christine Bayly Amy Webster & Danielle Newton - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):11.
    In Victoria, Australia, the law regulating abortion was reformed in 2008, and a clause was introduced requiring doctors with a conscientious objection to abortion to refer women to another provid...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  28
    Conscientious Objection to Participation in Abortion by Midwives and Nurses: A Systematic Review of Reasons.Valerie Fleming, Lucy Frith, Ans Luyben & Beate Ramsayer - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):31.
    Freedom of conscience is a core element of human rights respected by most European countries. It allows abortion through the inclusion of a conscience clause, which permits opting out of providing such services. However, the grounds for invoking conscientious objection lack clarity. Our aim in this paper is to take a step in this direction by carrying out a systematic review of reasons by midwives and nurses for declining, on conscience grounds, to participate in abortion. We conducted a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20.  24
    Conscientious Objection: A Morally Insupportable Misuse of Authority.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (2):82-87.
    In this paper, I argue that the conscience clause around abortion provision in England, Scotland and Wales is inadequate for two reasons. First, the patient and doctor are differently situated with respect to social power. Doctors occupy a position of significant moral and epistemic authority with respect to their patients, who are vulnerable and relatively disempowered. Doctors are rightly required to disclose their conscientious objection, but given the positioning of the patient and doctor, the act of doing so (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21.  7
    Conscientious Objection: Unmasking the Impartial Spectator.Toni C. Saad - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):677-678.
    Hoping to bring some objectivity to the debate, Ben-Moshe has argued that conscientious objection in medicine should be accommodated based on its concordance with the ‘impartial spectator’, a metaphor for conscience drawn from the writings of Adam Smith. This response finds fault with this account on two fronts: first, that its claim to objectivity is unsubstantiated; second, that it implicitly relies on moral absolutes, despite claiming that conscience is a social construct, thereby calling its coherence and claims into (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  21
    Medical Acts and Conscientious Objection: What Can a Physician Be Compelled to Do.Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):262-282.
    A key question has been underexplored in the literature on conscientious objection: if a physician is required to perform ‘medical activities,’ what is a medical activity? This paper explores the question by employing a teleological evaluation of medicine and examining the analogy of military conscripts, commonly cited in the conscientious objection debate. It argues that physicians (and other healthcare professionals) can only be expected to perform and support medical acts – acts directed towards their patients’ health. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23.  22
    Patriotic Conscientious Objection to Military Service.Shlomit Asheri-Shahaf - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (2):155-172.
    The purpose of this paper is to show that conscientious objection to military service is essentially not a dilemma of freedom of conscience versus the duty to obey the law, but above all a dilemma between two conflicting patriotic moral obligations. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that CO is justifiable on the basis of what is known as moderate patriotism, that is, out of a patriotism which is committed simultaneously to universal and particular values. The paper begins with a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  35
    Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Private Ideological Convictions Must Not Supercede Public Service Obligations.Udo Schuklenk - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (5).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  25.  5
    Conscientious Objection Should Not Be Equated with Moral Objection: A Response to Ben-Moshe.Nathan Emmerich - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):673-674.
    In his recent article, Ben-Moshe offers an account of conscientious objection in terms of the truth of the underlying moral objections, as judged by the standards of an impartial spectator. He seems to advocate for the view that having a valid moral objection to X is the sole criteria for the instantiation of a right to conscientiously object to X, and seems indifferent to the moral status of the prevailing moral attitudes. I argue that the moral status (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  17
    Conscientious Objection in Italy: Table 1.Francesca Minerva - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):170-173.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  27. A Defence of Conscientious Objection in Medicine: A Reply to Schuklenk and Savulescu.Christopher Cowley - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):358-364.
    In a recent Bioethics editorial, Udo Schuklenk argues against allowing Canadian doctors to conscientiously object to any new euthanasia procedures approved by Parliament. In this he follows Julian Savulescu's 2006 BMJ paper which argued for the removal of the conscientious objection clause in the 1967 UK Abortion Act. Both authors advance powerful arguments based on the need for uniformity of service and on analogies with reprehensible kinds of personal exemption. In this article I want to defend the practice (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  28.  14
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare: Why Tribunals Might Be the Answer.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):213-217.
    A recent focus of the debate on conscientious objection in healthcare is the question of whether practitioners should have to justify their refusal to perform certain functions. A recent article by Cowley addresses a practical aspect of this controversy, namely the question of whether doctors claiming conscientious objector status in relation to abortion should be required, like their counterparts claiming exemption from military conscription, to defend their claim before a tribunal. Cowley argues against the use of tribunals (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29.  9
    Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with Healthcare Professionalism?Mary Neal & Sara Fovargue - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):221-235.
    Is conscientious objection necessarily incompatible with the role and duties of a healthcare professional? An influential minority of writers on the subject think that it is. Here, we outline...
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Mark R. Wicclair - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):205–227.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  31.  18
    Testing Conscientious Objection by the Norm of Medicine.Toni C. Saad & Gregory Jackson - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):9-16.
    Debate persists over the place of conscience in medicine. Some argue for the complete exclusion of conscientious objection, while others claim an absolute right of refusal. This paper proposes that claims of conscientious objection can and should be permitted if they concern kinds of actions which fall outside of the normative standard of medicine, which is the pursuit of health. Medical practice which meets this criterion we call medicine qua medicine. If conscientious refusal concerns something (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  7
    Conscience, Conscientious Objections, and Medicine.Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):487-506.
    To inform the ongoing discussion of whether claims of conscientious objection allow medical professionals to refuse to perform tasks that would otherwise be their duty, this paper begins with a review of the philosophical literature that describes conscience as either a moral sense or the dictate of reason. Even though authors have starkly different views on what conscience is, advocates of both approaches agree that conscience should be obeyed and that keeping promises is a conscience-given moral imperative. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  44
    Conscientious Objection by Health Care Professionals.Gry Wester - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (7):427-437.
    Certain health care services and goods, although legal and often generally accepted in a society, are by some considered morally problematic. Debates on conscientious objection in health care try to resolve whether and when physicians, nurses and pharmacists should be allowed to refuse to provide medical services and goods because of their ethical or religious beliefs. These debates have most often focused on issues such as how to balance the interests of patients and health care professionals, and the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34.  46
    Conscientious Objection, Complicity in Wrongdoing, and a Not-So-Moderate Approach.Francesca Minerva - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):109-119.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  35.  47
    Conscientious Objections in Pharmacy Practice in Great Britain.Zuzana Deans - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):48-57.
    Pharmacists who refuse to provide certain services or treatment for reasons of conscience have been criticized for failing to fulfil their professional obligations. Currently, individual pharmacists in Great Britain can withhold services or treatment for moral or religious reasons, provided they refer the patient to an alternative source. The most high-profile cases have concerned the refusal to supply emergency hormonal contraception, which will serve as an example in this article.I propose that the pharmacy profession's policy on conscientious objections should (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. The Truth Behind Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):404-410.
    Answers to the questions of what justifies conscientious objection in medicine in general and which specific objections should be respected have proven to be elusive. In this paper, I develop a new framework for conscientious objection in medicine that is based on the idea that conscience can express true moral claims. I draw on one of the historical roots, found in Adam Smith’s impartial spectator account, of the idea that an agent’s conscience can determine the correct (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37.  13
    When Conscientious Objection Runs Amok: A Physician Refusing HIV Preventative to a Bisexual Patient.Abram Brummett - forthcoming - Sage Publications: Clinical Ethics.
    Clinical Ethics, Ahead of Print. This paper reports of a case where a physician conscientiously objected to prescribing PrEP to a bisexual patient so as not to “enable immoral sexual behavior.” The case represents an instance of conscience creep, a phenomenon whereby clinicians invoke conscientious objection in sometimes objectionable ways that extend beyond the traditional contexts of abortion, sterilization, or physician aid in dying. This essay uses a reasonability view of conscientious objection to argue that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  9
    Conscientious Objection, Moral Integrity, and Professional Obligations.Mark R. Wicclair - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (3):543-559.
    Typically, a refusal to provide a medical service is an instance of conscientious objection only when the medical service is legal, professionally accepted, and clinically appropriate. That is, conscientious objection typically occurs only when practitioners reject prevailing norms or practices. Insofar as refusing to provide antibiotics for a viral infection does not violate prevailing clinical norms, there is no need for the physician in Case 1 to justify his refusal to provide antibiotics by appealing to his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  16
    Conscientious Objection and Person-Centered Care.Stephen Buetow & Natalie Gauld - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (2):143-155.
    Person-centered care offers a promising way to manage clinicians’ conscientious objection to providing services they consider morally wrong. Health care centered on persons, rather than patients, recognizes clinicians and patients on the same stratum. The moral interests of clinicians, as persons, thus warrant as much consideration as those of other persons, including patients. Interconnected moral interests of clinicians, patients, and society construct the clinician as a socially embedded and integrated self, transcending the simplistic duality of private conscience versus (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  26
    Conscientious Objection and its Social Context.Ryan E. Lawrence - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):613-614.
    Conscientious objection among physicians is a perennial hot topic on both sides of the Atlantic. Sven Nordstrand's survey of Norwegian medical students adds fresh data to this ongoing debate.1Their starting point, whether doctors should be allowed to refuse any procedure to which they object on cultural, moral or religious grounds, is truly at the heart of the debate. Their finding that only 20.8% of students endorse this position is striking as it is less than half the number reported (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. 'Taxation, Conscientious Objection and Religious Freedom'.Annabelle Lever - 2013 - Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):144-153.
    This is part of a symposium on conscientious objection and religious freedom inspired by the US Catholic Church's claim that being forced to pay for health insurance that covers abortions (the effect of 'Obamacare')is the equivalent of forcing pacifists to fight. This article takes issue with this claim, and shows that while it would be unjust on democratic principles to force pacifists to fight, given their willingness to serve their country in other ways, there is no democratic (...) to forcing those who believe abortion to be murder to pay for health insurance coverage that includes abortion. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  43
    Conscientious Objection and Healthcare in the UK: Why Tribunals Are Not the Answer.Christopher Cowley - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):69-72.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  43.  32
    Conscientious Objection and Compromising the Patient: Response to Hughes.Julian Savulescu & Udo Schuklenk - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):473-476.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44. The Foundations of Conscientious Objection: Against Freedom and Autonomy.Yossi Nehushtan & John Danaher - 2018 - Jurisprudence 9 (3):541-565.
    According to the common view, conscientious objection is grounded in autonomy or in ‘freedom of conscience’ and is tolerated out of respect for the objector's autonomy. Emphasising freedom of conscience or autonomy as a central concept within the issue of conscientious objection implies that the conscientious objector should have an independent choice among alternative beliefs, positions or values. In this paper it is argued that: (a) it is not true that the typical conscientious objector (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  42
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare and the Duty to Refer.Christopher Cowley - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):207-212.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46. Questionable Benefits and Unavoidable Personal Beliefs: Defending Conscientious Objection for Abortion.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (46):178-182.
    Conscientious objection in healthcare has come under heavy criticism on two grounds recently, particularly regarding abortion provision. First, critics claim conscientious objection involves a refusal to provide a legal and beneficial procedure requested by a patient, denying them access to healthcare. Second, they argue the exercise of conscientious objection is based on unverifiable personal beliefs. These characteristics, it is claimed, disqualify conscientious objection in healthcare. Here, we defend conscientious objection in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  47.  40
    Conscientious Objection? Yes, but Make Sure It is Genuine.Christopher Meyers & Robert D. Woods - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):19 – 20.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  48.  22
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare, Referral and the Military Analogy.Steve Clarke - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):218-221.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49.  37
    Conscientious Objection and “Effective Referral”.Roger Trigg - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):32-43.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  12
    Conscientious Objection to Referrals.Thomas Finegan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (4):277-279.
    Christopher Cowley 1 has recently put forward three arguments against the legal accommodation of a general practitioner’s conscientious objection to abortion referrals. i He claims that the adoption of these arguments does not undermine a more general right to CO to involvement in abortion. I argue that Cowley is seriously mistaken. His three arguments, especially the second and third, proceed on a path directed towards the outright rejection of a right to CO in healthcare contexts. A common problem (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000