Results for 'consent'

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  1.  15
    “Green informed consent” in the classroom, clinic, and consultation room.Cristina Richie - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (4):507-515.
    The carbon emissions of global health care activities make up 4–5% of total world emissions, placing it on par with the food sector. Carbon emissions are particularly relevant for health care because of climate change health hazards. Doctors and health care professionals must connect their health care delivery with carbon emissions and minimize resource use when possible as a part of their obligation to do no harm. Given that reducing carbon is a global ethical priority, the informed consent process (...)
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  2.  27
    Equality in the Informed Consent Process: Competence to Consent, Substitute Decision-Making, and Discrimination of Persons with Mental Disorders.Matthé Scholten, Jakov Gather & Jochen Vollmann - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (1):108-136.
    According to what we propose to call “the competence model,” competence is a necessary condition for valid informed consent. If a person is not competent to make a treatment decision, the decision must be made by a substitute decision-maker on her behalf. Recent reports of various United Nations human rights bodies claim that article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities involves a wholesale rejection of this model, regardless of whether the model is based on (...)
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  3.  7
    Taking Consent Seriously: IRB Intervention in the Consent Process.John A. Robertson - 1982 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 4 (5):1.
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  4.  93
    Ethical Endgames: Broad Consent for Narrow Interests; Open Consent for Closed Minds.Jan Reinert Karlsen, Jan Helge Solbakk & Søren Holm - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (4):572-583.
    The ongoing legal and bioethics debates on consent requirements for collecting, storing, and utilizing human biological material for purposes of basic and applied research—that is, genomic research biobanking—have already managed to pass through three ostensibly dissimilar stages.
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  5.  23
    In Defence of informed consent for health record research - why arguments from ‘easy rescue’, ‘no harm’ and ‘consent bias’ fail.Thomas Ploug - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-13.
    BackgroundHealth data holds great potential for improved treatments. Big data research and machine learning models have been shown to hold great promise for improved diagnostics and treatment planning. The potential is tied, however, to the availability of personal health data. In recent years, it has been argued that data from health records should be available for health research, and that individuals have a duty to make the data available for such research. A central point of debate is whether such secondary (...)
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  6.  45
    Models of Consent to Return of Incidental Findings in Genomic Research.Paul S. Appelbaum, Erik Parens, Cameron R. Waldman, Robert Klitzman, Abby Fyer, Josue Martinez, W. Nicholson Price & Wendy K. Chung - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (4):22-32.
    Genomic research—including whole genome sequencing and whole exome sequencing—has a growing presence in contemporary biomedical investigation. The capacity of sequencing techniques to generate results that go beyond the primary aims of the research—historically referred to as “incidental findings”—has generated considerable discussion as to how this information should be handled—that is, whether incidental results should be returned, and if so, which ones.Federal regulations governing most human subjects research in the United States require the disclosure of “the procedures to be followed” in (...)
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  7.  33
    Participation versus Consent: Should Corporations Be Run according to Democratic Principles?Stefan Hielscher, Markus Beckmann & Ingo Pies - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):533-563.
    ABSTRACT:The notion of “democracy” has become a much-debated concept in scholarship on business ethics, management, and organization studies. The strategy of this paper is to distinguish between a principle of organization that fosters participation (type I democracy) and a principle of legitimation that draws on consent (type II democracy). Based on this distinction, we highlight conceptual shortcomings of the literature on stakeholder democracy. We demonstrate that parts of the literature tend to confound ends with means. Many approaches employ type (...)
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  8.  10
    Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4).
    Most regulations and guidelines require that potential research participants be told a great deal of information during the consent process. Many of these documents, and most of the scholars who consider the consent process, assume that all this information must be disclosed because it must all be understood. However, a wide range of studies surveying apparently competent participants in clinical trials around the world show that many do not understand key aspects of what they have been told. The (...)
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  9.  24
    Rethinking counselling in prenatal screening: An ethical analysis of informed consent in the context of non‐invasive prenatal testing (NIPT).Adriana Kater‐Kuipers, Inez D. Beaufort, Robert‐Jan H. Galjaard & Eline M. Bunnik - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (7):671-678.
    Informed consent is a key condition for prenatal screening programmes to reach their aim of promoting reproductive autonomy. Reaching this aim is currently being challenged with the introduction of non‐invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in first‐trimester prenatal screening programmes: amongst others its procedural ease—it only requires a blood draw and reaches high levels of reliability—might hinder women’s understanding that they should make a personal, informed decision about screening. We offer arguments for a renewed recognition and use of informed consent (...)
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  10.  34
    Use of broad consent and related procedures in genomics research: Perspectives from research participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Oliver Mweemba, John Musuku, Bongani M. Mayosi, Michael Parker, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Janet Seeley, Paulina Tindana & Jantina De Vries - 2019 - Global Bioethics:1-16.
    The use of broad consent for genomics research raises important ethical questions for the conduct of genomics research, including relating to its acceptability to research participants and comprehension of difficult scientific concepts. To explore these and other challenges, we conducted a study using qualitative methods with participants enrolled in an H3Africa Rheumatic Heart Disease genomics study in Zambia to explore their views on broad consent, sample and data sharing and secondary use. In-depth interviews were conducted with RHDGen participants, (...)
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  11. The crisis of consent: how stronger legal protection may lead to weaker consent in data protection.Bart W. Schermer, Bart Custers & Simone van der Hof - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (2):171-182.
    In this article we examine the effectiveness of consent in data protection legislation. We argue that the current legal framework for consent, which has its basis in the idea of autonomous authorisation, does not work in practice. In practice the legal requirements for consent lead to ‘consent desensitisation’, undermining privacy protection and trust in data processing. In particular we argue that stricter legal requirements for giving and obtaining consent as proposed in the European Data protection (...)
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  12.  61
    Use of broad consent and related procedures in genomics research: Perspectives from research participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Jantina De Vries, Paulina Tindana, Janet Seeley, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Michael Parker, Bongani M. Mayosi, John Musuku & Oliver Mweemba - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):184-199.
    ABSTRACT The use of broad consent for genomics research raises important ethical questions for the conduct of genomics research, including relating to its acceptability to research participants and comprehension of difficult scientific concepts. To explore these and other challenges, we conducted a study using qualitative methods with participants enrolled in an H3Africa Rheumatic Heart Disease genomics study (the RHDGen network) in Zambia to explore their views on broad consent, sample and data sharing and secondary use. In-depth interviews were (...)
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  13.  48
    The possibility of consent.David Owens - 2011 - Ratio 24 (4):402-421.
    Worries about the possibility of consent recall a more familiar problem about promising raised by Hume. To see the parallel here we must distinguish the power of consent from the normative significance of choice. I'll argue that we have normative interests, interests in being able to control the rights and obligations of ourselves and those around us, interests distinct from our interest in controlling the non-normative situation. Choice gets its normative significance from our non-normative control interests. By contrast, (...)
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  14.  22
    Unethical informed consent caused by overlooking poorly measured nocebo effects.Jeremy Howick - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (9):590-594.
    Unlike its friendly cousin the placebo effect, the nocebo effect has been almost ignored. Epistemic and ethical confusions related to its existence have gone all but unnoticed. Contrary to what is often asserted, adverse events following from taking placebo interventions are not necessarily nocebo effects; they could have arisen due to natural history. Meanwhile, ethical informed consent has centred almost exclusively on the need to inform patients about intervention risks with patients to preserve their autonomy. Researchers have failed to (...)
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  15.  30
    The consent problem within DNA biobanks.Darren Shickle - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (3):503-519.
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  16.  24
    From “Informed” to “Engaged” Consent: Risks and Obligations in Consent for Participation in a Health Data Repository.Elizabeth Bromley, Alexandra Mendoza-Graf, Sandra Berry, Camille Nebeker & Dmitry Khodyakov - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):172-182.
    The development and use of large and dynamic health data repositories designed to support research pose challenges to traditional informed consent models. We used semi-structured interviewing to elicit diverse research stakeholders' views of a model of consent appropriate to participation in initiatives that entail collection, long-term storage, and undetermined future research use of multiple types of health data. We demonstrate that, when considering health data repositories, research stakeholders replace a concept of consent as informed with one in (...)
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  17.  14
    Click here to consent forever: Expiry dates for informed consent.Bart Custers - 2016 - Big Data and Society 3 (1).
    The legal basis for processing personal data and some other types of Big Data is often the informed consent of the data subject involved. Many data controllers, such as social network sites, offer terms and conditions, privacy policies or similar documents to which a user can consent when registering as a user. There are many issues with such informed consent: people get too many consent requests to read everything, policy documents are often very long and difficult (...)
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  18.  36
    Ethical Issues in Consent for the Reuse of Data in Health Data Platforms.Alex McKeown, Miranda Mourby, Paul Harrison, Sophie Walker, Mark Sheehan & Ilina Singh - 2021 - Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (1):1-21.
    Data platforms represent a new paradigm for carrying out health research. In the platform model, datasets are pooled for remote access and analysis, so novel insights for developing better stratified and/or personalised medicine approaches can be derived from their integration. If the integration of diverse datasets enables development of more accurate risk indicators, prognostic factors, or better treatments and interventions, this obviates the need for the sharing and reuse of data; and a platform-based approach is an appropriate model for facilitating (...)
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  19. An ethics of expertise based on informed consent.Kevin C. Elliott - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):637-661.
    Ethicists widely accept the notion that scientists have moral responsibilities to benefit society at large. The dissemination of scientific information to the public and its political representatives is central to many of the ways in which scientists serve society. Unfortunately, the task of providing information can often give rise to moral quandaries when scientific experts participate in politically charged debates over issues that are fraught with uncertainty. This paper develops a theoretical framework for an “ethics of expertise” (EOE) based on (...)
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  20.  12
    Electronic Informed Consent in Mobile Applications Research.John T. Wilbanks - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):147-153.
    The article covers electronic informed consent from different dimensions so that practitioners might understand the history, regulation, and current status of eIC. It covers the transition of informed consent to electronic screens and the implications of that transition in terms of design, costs, and data analysis. The article explores the limits of regulation mandating eIC for mobile application research, and addresses some of the broader social context around eIC.
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  21.  8
    Safeguards for procedural consent in obstetric care.David I. Shalowitz & Steven J. Ralston - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (9):628-629.
    Van der Pijl et al outline data suggesting an alarmingly high incidence of violation of the bodily integrity of patients in labour, including episiotomies performed without patients’ consent, or over their explicit objection.1 Similar data have been reported from the USA and Canada.2 The authors appropriately conclude that explicit consent is required at the time of all invasive obstetrical procedures, including episiotomy. Commonsense adjustments to the duration and detail of consent under conditions of clinical urgency are appropriate (...)
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  22.  30
    The myth of informed consent: in daily practice and in clinical trials.W. A. Silverman - 1989 - Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (1):6-11.
    Until about thirty years ago, the extent of disclosure about and consent-seeking for medical interventions was influenced by a beneficence model of professional behaviour. Informed consent shifted attention to a duty to respect the autonomy of patients. The new requirement arrived on the American scene in two separate contexts: for daily practice in 1957, and for clinical study in 1966. A confusing double standard has been established. 'Daily consent' is reviewed, if at all, only in retrospect. Doctors (...)
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  23.  23
    Locke, Simmons, and Consent.Michael Davis - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (4):667-690.
    This paper is primarily a response to John Simmons’s critique of Locke’s consent theory of political obligation (Two Treatises). It seeks to apply ordinary legal reasoning to what Locke actually says about “express consent” and “tacit consent.” The result is a theory both different from the theory commonly attributed to Locke and more plausible. Among the differences is that express consent (“entering political society”) is understood to arise chiefly from seeking to vote (rather than by oath (...)
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  24.  43
    Relational autonomy in informed consent (RAIC) as an ethics of care approach to the concept of informed consent.Peter I. Osuji - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):101-111.
    The perspectives of the dominant Western ethical theories, have dominated the concepts of autonomy and informed consent for many years. Recently this dominant understanding has been challenged by ethics of care which, although, also emanates from the West presents a more nuanced concept: relational autonomy, which is more faithful to our human experience. By paying particular attention to relational autonomy, particularity and Process approach to ethical deliberations in ethics of care, this paper seeks to construct a concept of informed (...)
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  25.  32
    Gaining and maintaining consent when capacity can be an issue: a research study with people with Huntington's disease.Eleanor Wilson, Kristian Pollock & Aimee Aubeeluck - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (3):142-147.
    This paper recognizes the complexity of the debate on informed consent and discusses the importance of the ongoing process of consent for people affected by Huntington's disease (HD). Although written information may not be the most appropriate form of obtaining informed consent in qualitative research, it remains an important part of the ethical approval process for health research in the UK. This paper draws on a study in which the information sheet and consent form were specifically (...)
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  26.  8
    Informed consent, multiple relationships, and confidentiality: a comparison across four countries.Mark M. Leach & Jacqueline E. Akhurst - 2023 - Ethics and Behavior 33 (3):231-238.
    There are approximately 60 codes of ethics developed by national and regional psychological associations around the world, and there is wide variability in their structures, formats, lengths, and d...
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  27.  21
    Trustworthiness as information: Satisfying the understanding condition of valid consent.Robert K. Martin - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (5):478-488.
    Within medical ethics, there is widespread agreement that morally valid consent includes an understanding condition. Disagreement centers on what is meant by that understanding condition. Tom Dougherty proposed that this understanding condition should be divided into the two mutually exclusive categories of descriptive information and contextual information. Further, Dougherty argues that each type of information is necessary to satisfy the understanding condition. In contrast, I argue that when the deontic aspect of valid consent is in view, each type (...)
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  28.  34
    Consent to HIV testing and consequentialism in health care ethics.Michael Parker - 2004 - HEC Forum 16 (1):45-52.
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  29.  35
    Informed Consent: Practices and Views of Investigators in a Multinational Clinical Trial.Lindsay Sabik, Christine A. Pace, Heidi P. Forster-Gertner, David Wendler, Judith D. Bebchuk, Jorge A. Tavel, Laura A. McNay, Jack Killen, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Christine Grady - 2004 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (5):13-18.
  30.  20
    Informed consent” – an integrated teaching module on ethical and historical aspects for the new subject “history, theory, ethics of medicine.Jan Schildmann, Florian Steger & Jochen Vollmann - 2007 - Ethik in der Medizin 19 (3):187-199.
    ZusammenfassungHistorische, theoretische und ethische Aspekte der Medizin sind Lehrinhalte des medizinischen Ausbildungscurriculums, die in dem neu eingeführten Querschnittsbereich 2 "Geschichte, Theorie, Ethik der Medizin" vermittelt werden sollen. Gegenstand dieser Arbeit ist die Darstellung von Unterrichtskonzept und Evaluationsergebnissen eines medizinhistorische und -ethische Inhalte intergrierenden Lehrmoduls zum Thema der Aufklärung und Einwilligung in Klinik und medizinischer Forschung. Die integrierte Vermittlung medizinethischer und -historischer Inhalte wurde von den Studierenden positiv bewertet. Die von den Kursteilnehmenden im Rahmen der Evaluation gezeigten Kenntnisse sowie die Selbsteinschätzung (...)
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  31. Troubling consent : pain and pressure in labour and childbirth.Claire Murray - 2020 - In Camilla Pickles & Jonathan Herring (eds.), Women's birthing bodies and the law: unauthorised intimate examinations, power, and vulnerability. New York, NY: Hart Publishing, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing.
  32. Consent, contract and autonomy.Peter Stone - 2018 - In Edwin E. Etieyibo (ed.), Perspectives in social contract theory. Washington DC: The Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
     
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  33.  14
    Trust and consent: a prospective study on parents’ perspective during a neonatal trial.Sonia Dahan, Camille Jung, Gilles Dassieu, Xavier Durrmeyer & Laurence Caeymaex - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (10):678-683.
    ObjectiveThis study aimed to describe how parents and physicians experienced the informed consent interview and to investigate the aspects of the relationship that influenced parents’ decision during the consent process for a randomised clinical trial in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. The secondary objective was to describe the perspectives of parents and physicians in the specific situation of prenatal informed consent.SettingSingle centre study in NICU of the Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Créteil, France, using a convenience period (...)
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  34.  44
    Is Consent of the Donor Enough to Justify the Removal of Living Organs?Govert den Hartogh - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):45-54.
  35.  31
    Race, Religion, and Informed Consent — Lessons from Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
    Patients belonging to ethnic, racial, and religious minorities have been all but excluded from the legal academy’s ongoing conversation about informed consent. Perhaps this is just as well, since the conversation appears to have concluded that the doctrine has failed to serve as a meaningful regulation of clinical relationships. Informed consent does not operate in practice the way it was intended in theory. More than a decade ago, Peter Schuck noted the “informed consent gap” that distinguishes the (...)
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  36.  31
    Does consent override proportionality?C. S. Nino - 1986 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (2):183-187.
  37.  28
    Effective Use of Consent Forms and Interactive Questions in the Consent Process.Barton W. Palmer, Erin L. Cassidy, Laura B. Dunn, Adam P. Spira & Javaid I. Sheikh - 2008 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 30 (2):8.
    Although written consent forms are standard in clinical research, there is little regulatory or empirical guidance regarding how to most effectively review consent forms with potential participants. We developed an algorithm for embedding five questions with corrective feedback while reading consent forms with potential participants, and then applied it in the context of seven clinical research studies. A substantial proportion of participants within each protocol displayed initially inadequate responses to at least one question, but after the protocol (...)
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  38.  26
    Therapeutic optimism in the consent forms of phase 1 gene transfer trials: an empirical analysis.J. Kimmelman - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):209-214.
    Background: “Therapeutic misconception” arises when human subjects interpret a clinical trial as aimed primarily at therapy rather than producing knowledge. Therapeutic misconceptions may be more prevalent in trials enrolling gravely ill subjects or involving novel and well publicised investigational agents.Objective: To examine the extent to which investigators express therapeutic optimism in phase 1 human gene transfer consent documents, whether highly active gene transfer researchers are more prone to expressing therapeutic optimism, and whether consent forms have grown more optimistic (...)
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  39. Consent, Freedom and Political Obligation.J. P. Plamenatz - 1939 - Philosophy 14 (53):114-115.
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  40.  70
    Understanding acts of consent: Using speech act theory to help resolve moral dilemmas and legal disputes.Monica R. Cowart - 2004 - Law and Philosophy 23 (5):495 - 525.
    Understanding what it means toconsent is of considerable importance sincesignificant moral issues depend on how this actis defined. For instance, determining whetherconsent has occurred is the deciding factor insexual assault cases; its proper occurrence isa necessary condition for federally fundedhuman subject research. Even though mosttheorists recognize the legal and moralimportance of consent, there is still littleagreement concerning how consent should bedefined, or whether different domains involvingconsent demand context-specific definitions.Understanding what it means to consent isfurther complicated by the (...)
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  41.  26
    Informed Consent and the Refusal of Medical Treatment in the Correctional Setting.Frederick R. Parker & Charles J. Paine - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (3):240-251.
    It was not until the nineteenth century that Western nations came to replace mutilation, corporal punishment, and banishment as the favored method of criminal punishment with the more humane concept of imprisonment. Even then, however, a convicted inmate was viewed as nothing more than a slave of the state, entitled only to the most basic of human rights and subject to the whim and peril of his jailor's desire. The shift to imprisonment gradually was accompanied by the additional humanitarian demand (...)
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  42.  33
    Informed Consent and the Refusal of Medical Treatment in the Correctional Setting.Frederick R. Parker & Charles J. Paine - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (3):240-251.
    It was not until the nineteenth century that Western nations came to replace mutilation, corporal punishment, and banishment as the favored method of criminal punishment with the more humane concept of imprisonment. Even then, however, a convicted inmate was viewed as nothing more than a slave of the state, entitled only to the most basic of human rights and subject to the whim and peril of his jailor's desire. The shift to imprisonment gradually was accompanied by the additional humanitarian demand (...)
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  43.  27
    The case against meta-consent: not only do Ploug and Holm not answer_ it, they make it _even stronger.Neil C. Manson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (9):627-628.
    In a recent article, I argued that Ploug and Holm’s ‘meta-consent’ proposal should be rejected for biobank governance. This was because, although meta-consent is permissible, it is both burdensome and ethically omissible. There is no ethical reason why funders should undertake the additional costs. Ploug and Holm have sought to respond to these arguments. Here, it is noted that not only do they fail to adequately refuse the case against meta-consent, they fail to even engage with the (...)
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  44.  37
    Client preferences for informed consent information.Ellen B. Braaten & Michael M. Handelsman - 1997 - Ethics and Behavior 7 (4):311 – 328.
    Thirty-five current therapy clients, 47 former clients, and 42 college students with no therapy experience rated 27 items in terms of importance for inclusion in informed consent discussions. The current and former client samples rated information about inappropriate therapeutic techniques, confidentiality, and the risks of alternative treatments as most important, and information about the personal characteristics of the therapist and the therapist's degree as least important. The results of this study provide evidence for differential informed consent disclosure practices.
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  45.  38
    Making Research Consent Forms Informative and Understandable: The Experience of the Indian Health Service.William L. Freeman - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):510.
    The mission of the Indian Health Service affects what research is done and how It is reviewed and managed and in turn affects the forms and process used to obtain informed consent. Consent forms must be Informative and understandable to American Indian and Alaska Native potential volunteers; the process used to obtain informed consent must minimize any institutional pressure to participate. The IHS Institutional Review Boards developed seven research Model Volunteer Consent Forms.
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  46.  49
    Reporting of informed consent, standard of care and post-trial obligations in global randomized intervention trials: A systematic survey of registered trials.Emma R. M. Cohen, Jennifer M. O'neill, Michel Joffres, Ross E. G. Upshur & Edward Mills - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):74-80.
    Objective: Ethical guidelines are designed to ensure benefits, protection and respect of participants in clinical research. Clinical trials must now be registered on open-access databases and provide details on ethical considerations. This systematic survey aimed to determine the extent to which recently registered clinical trials report the use of standard of care and post-trial obligations in trial registries, and whether trial characteristics vary according to setting. Methods: We selected global randomized trials registered on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov and http://www.controlled-trials.com. We searched for intervention (...)
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  47.  11
    Harmonising green informed consent with autonomous clinical decision-making: a reply to Resnik and Pugh.Eva Sayone Cohen, Dionne Sofia Kringos, Wouter Johan Karel Hehenkamp & Cristina Richie - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (7):498-500.
    Resnik and Pugh recently explored the ethical implications of routinely integrating environmental concerns into clinical decision-making. While we share their concern for the holistic well-being of patients, our response offers a different clinical and bioethical stance on green informed consent and patient autonomy. Contrary to the authors’ lack of data to support their concerns about provider and patient willingness to engage in climate-related conversations, we provide evidence supporting their sustainability engagement and stress the importance of a proactive, anticipatory approach (...)
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  48.  26
    How Important Is Consent for Controlled Clinical Trials?Barbara MacKinnon - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):221.
    The Nuremberg Code of ethical principles for experiments involving human beings has as its first requirement that “the voluntary consent of the human subject is absolutely essential.” Since the time of the trials that supplied its motivation the principles have been amplified and detail and distinctions have been added. For example, the Declaration of Helsinki, adopted by the World Medical Association in 1964, again laid down general principles related to voluntariness, balance of risk and benefit, and scientific soundness. However, (...)
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  49.  16
    A commentary on 'informed consent to septoplasty: An anecdote from the field'.Edmund Erde - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (1):18 – 27.
    This paper is an analysis of the events recounted in 'Informed consent to septoplasty: An anecdote from the field.' As a commentary, it assesses the behavior of many agents who are parties to the story - physicians, nurses, friends of the patient, the patient's wife and the patient himself. This story is interesting for being mundane. The medical condition involved and the failures of care are not momentous. The patient's role as a medical ethicist led him to see things (...)
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  50.  7
    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Informed Consent, and Rescue: What Provides Moral Justification for the Provision of CPR?Eric Kodish & Johan Bester - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (1):67-73.
    Questions related to end-of-life decision making are common in clinical ethics and may be exceedingly difficult. Chief among these are the provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and do-not-resuscitate orders (DNRs). To better address such questions, clarity is needed on the values of medical ethics that underlie CPR and the relevant moral framework for making treatment decisions. An informed consent model is insufficient to provide justification for CPR. Instead, ethical justification for CPR rests on the rule of rescue and on (...)
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