Results for 'contraception'

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Bibliography: Contraception in Applied Ethics
  1.  53
    Emergency Contraceptives and the Beginning of Human Animals.Eze Paez - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):433-439.
    Emergency contraceptives may sometimes prevent implantation, thereby causing the death of the embryo. According to some positions contrary to abortion, because the embryo is a human animal, there are usually decisive moral reasons not to use them. In this article, I will show that objecting to the use of emergency contraceptives on those grounds is unjustified. If organisms are real existents, then according to the most plausible conception of what is required for a group of cells to compose one, the (...)
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  2. Contraception is not a reductio of Marquis.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (5):508-510.
    Don Marquis’ future-like-ours account argues that abortion is seriously immoral because itdeprives the embryo or fetus of a valuable future much like our own. Marquis was mindful ofcontraception being reductio ad absurdum of his reasoning, and argued that prior tofertilisation, there is not an identifiable subject of harm. Contra Marquis, Tomer Chaffercontends that the ovum is a plausible subject of harm, and therefore contraception deprives theovum of a future-like-ours. In response, I argue that being an identifiable subject of harm (...)
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  3. Emergency Contraception and Conscientious Objection.J. Paul Kelleher - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):290-304.
    Emergency contraception — also known as the morning after pill — is marketed and sold, under various brand names, in over one hundred countries around the world. In some countries, customers can purchase the drug without a prescription. In others, a prescription must be presented to a licensed pharmacist. In virtually all of these countries, pharmacists are the last link in the chain of delivery. This article examines and ultimately rejects several standard moves in the bioethics literature on the (...)
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  4. Emergency contraception for women who have been raped: Must catholics test for ovulation, or is testing for pregnancy morally sufficient?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (4):305-331.
    : On the grounds that rape is an act of violence, not a natural act of intercourse, Roman Catholic teaching traditionally has permitted women who have been raped to take steps to prevent pregnancy, while consistently prohibiting abortion even in the case of rape. Recent scientific evidence that emergency contraception (EC) works primarily by preventing ovulation, not by preventing implantation or by aborting implanted embryos, has led Church authorities to permit the use of EC drugs in the setting of (...)
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  5.  38
    Oral contraceptive non-compliance in rural Bangladesh.M. A. Khan - 2004 - Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (6):647-661.
    This paper examines incorrect use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in rural Bangladesh by using data from an OC compliance survey. Of the 1031 current users of OCs interviewed, about 13% took their pills out of sequence, while 17% left incorrect intervals between pill packs. Forty per cent of the women reported missing one active pill during the 6 months prior to the survey, and 74% of them took correct action with the missed pill. Of the women who missed two active (...)
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  6. Elizabeth Anscombe and Contraception.Anthony McCarthy - 2019 - Logos I Ethos 50:47-65.
    In the 1960s, before the promulgation of Humanae Vitae, the Catholic philosophers Elizabeth Anscombe and Herbert McCabe OP debated whether there are convincing natural law arguments for the claim that contraception violates an exceptionless moral norm. This article revisits those arguments and critiques McCabe’s approach to natural law, concerned primarily with ‘social sin’ and not simply violations of ‘right reason,’ as one particularly ill-suited to addressing questions in sexual ethics and unable both to distinguish properly between certain forms of (...)
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  7.  9
    Extramarital Contraception in the Catholic Faith: A Call to Action from a Physician and Ethicist.Cara Buskmiller - 2023 - Nova et Vetera 21 (4):1245-1274.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Extramarital Contraception in the Catholic Faith:A Call to Action from a Physician and EthicistCara BuskmillerIntroductionDefinitionsBefore proceeding to a discussion of extramarital contraception, it is relevant to lay a foundation of definitions and limitations of this essay. Here, "sex" and "sexual act" will refer to acts of penile–vaginal intercourse and acts meant to lead to such intercourse, respectively. Other acts which are rightly called "sexual" are not relevant (...)
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  8.  13
    Population, abortion, contraception, and the relation between biopolitics, bioethics, and biolaw in Iran.Kiarash Aramesh - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 24 (2):129-134.
    The Islamic government of Iran recently passed and announced a new law titled “Rejuvenation of the Population and Protection of the Family.” This legislation is a noteworthy example of biopolitics‐influenced biolaw. In terms of abortion, contraception, prenatal screening, and population control, this law clearly contrasts with women's fundamental rights and freedoms and has significant health‐related consequences for different sectors of the population. A historical review of the population policies of the Islamic Republic of Iran shows the occurrence of multiple (...)
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  9.  42
    Therapeutic, Prophylactic, Untoward, and Contraceptive Effects of Combined Oral Contraceptives: Catholic Teaching, Natural Law, and the Principle of Double Effect When Deciding to Prescribe and Use.Murray Joseph Casey & Todd A. Salzman - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):20-34.
    Combined oral contraceptives have been demonstrated to have significant benefits for the treatment and prevention of disease. These medications also are associated with untoward health effects, and they may be directly contraceptive. Prescribers and users must compare and weigh the intended beneficial health effects against foreseeable but unintended possible adverse effects in their decisions to prescribe and use. Additionally, those who intend to abide by Catholic teachings must consider prohibitions against contraception. Ethical judgments concerning both health benefits and (...) are approached in this essay through an overview of the therapeutic, prophylactic, untoward, and contraceptive effects of COC and discussion of magisterial and traditional Catholic teachings from natural law. Discerning through the principle of double effect, proportionate reason, and evidence gathered from the sciences, medical and moral conclusions are drawn that we believe to be fully compliant with good medicine and Catholic teaching. (shrink)
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  10.  41
    Zika, contraception and the non‐identity problem.Keyur Doolabh, Lucius Caviola, Julian Savulescu, Michael Selgelid & Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):173-204.
    The 2016 outbreak of the Zika arbovirus was associated with large numbers of cases of the newly-recognised Congenital Zika Syndrome. This novel teratogenic epidemic raises significant ethical and practical issues. Many of these arise from strategies used to avoid cases of CZS, with contraception in particular being one proposed strategy that is atypical in epidemic control. Using contraception to reduce the burden of CZS has an ethical complication: interventions that impact the timing of conception alter which people will (...)
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  11. Conscientious objection and emergency contraception.Robert F. Card - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):8 – 14.
    This article argues that practitioners have a professional ethical obligation to dispense emergency contraception, even given conscientious objection to this treatment. This recent controversy affects all medical professionals, including physicians as well as pharmacists. This article begins by analyzing the option of referring the patient to another willing provider. Objecting professionals may conscientiously refuse because they consider emergency contraception to be equivalent to abortion or because they believe contraception itself is immoral. This article critically evaluates these reasons (...)
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  12.  8
    Locating Abortion and Contraception on the Obstetric Violence Continuum.Zoe L. Tongue - 2024 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 17 (1):1-24.
    This article builds on existing feminist literature on obstetric violence in the context of childbirth to argue that there is a continuum of obstetric violence that also includes that perpetuated in relation to pregnancy prevention and termination, as well as antenatal healthcare and birth. This structural violence is highlighted in relation to conscientious objection, the reporting of people suspected of illegal abortions by their healthcare providers, and contraceptive coercion. Recognizing the limitations of criminal and human rights approaches to obstetric violence, (...)
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  13. Contraception and Double Effect.Ezio Di Nucci - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):42-43.
  14.  5
    Emergency Contraception: Legal Consequences of Medical Classification.Elizabeth Gerber - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):428-431.
    Pharmacists with religious or ethical objections to prescribing emergency contraception won the latest round in the fight over conscience clauses in a case that could have broader implications for attempts to restrict access to contraception. In Stormans, Inc. v. Selecky, a federal District Court in Washington State granted an injunction to block the enforcement of regulations that would have forbidden pharmacists to refuse to dispense emergency contraception on the grounds of religious or ethical objections. In its decision, (...)
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  15.  47
    Contraception and Anesthesia: A Reply to James DuBois.Joseph Boyle - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):217-225.
    This is a response to James Dubois’ “Is anesthesia intrinsically wrong?” I do not address many of the claims in this article but only DuBois’ use of the moral evaluation of the medical use of anesthesia as a counter example to two lines of reasoning developed to defend the traditional Catholic prohibition of contraception. Elizabeth Anscombe's dialectical defense of this teaching does not imply that such a defense must logically apply to the use of anesthesia. John Finnis’ defense of (...)
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  16.  13
    Culture, Contraception, and Colorblindess: Youth Sexual Health Promotion as a Gendered Racial Project.Chris Barcelos - 2018 - Gender and Society 32 (2):252-273.
    Feminist scholars have identified how race and gender discourses influence the creation and implementation of school-based sexual health education and the provision of health care, yet there are few studies that examine how race and gender work in sexual health promotion as it occurs through community-based public health efforts. Drawing on three years of ethnographic research in a low-income Puerto Rican community, this article demonstrates how a gendered racial project of essentializing Latinx culture surrounding young women’s sexuality and reproduction works (...)
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  17.  29
    Contraception: A Worldwide Calamity?Patrick G. D. Riley - 2005 - Catholic Social Science Review 10:319-323.
    The author discusses the effects of contraception, which have borne out the predictions of Pope Paul VI's encyclical Humanae Vitae: the explosion of out-of-wedlock births, lack of respect for women, STD's, HIV/AIDS, etc. The overpopulation claims that fed the acceptance and promotion of contraception have been discredited by demographers; now the social costs of underpopulation are increasingly apparent. Acceptance of contraception has now also led to an embracing of morally objectionable technologies like cloning. This is the latest (...)
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  18.  18
    Dueling Definitions of Abortifacient: How Cultural, Political, and Religious Values Affect Language in the Contraception Debate.Claire Horner & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (4):14-19.
    Contraception works by preventing fertilization of an egg or preventing implantation of a fertilized embryo. For those who believe pregnancy begins at implantation, contraceptives preventing implantation are not abortifacient. However, for those who assert that pregnancy begins at fertilization, any agent causing the intentional loss of an embryo, even prior to implantation, is abortifacient, both morally and for lack of a different term to describe the postfertilization, preimplantation loss. In the debate on this topic, much of the discourse on (...)
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  19.  47
    Contraception, Abortion, and the Corruption of Medicine.Mathew Lu - 2013 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13 (4):625-633.
    The Obama administration’s HHS mandate to force Catholic and other religious organizations to provide insurance coverage for morally objectionable practices has been the source of a great deal of controversy. While the religious liberty question has received the most attention, the mandate reveals a yet deeper problem in the mainstream acceptance of contraception and even abortion as a normal part of medical practice. The author argues that these practices constitute a deep corruption of medicine itself, away from its original (...)
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  20. Contraception and Sterilization.Hugh Handley Bird & William Sinclair - 1979 - In Charles Gordon Scorer & Antony John Wing (eds.), Decision making in medicine: the practice of its ethics. London: E. Arnold.
     
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  21.  28
    Effects of oral contraceptive use on body mass index and blood pressure among female villagers in north-east thailand.Nobuko Murayama, Ayu Matsunaga, Ladda Tangbanluekal, Suwalee Tantawiwat & Ryutaro Ohtsuka - 2003 - Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (2):243-261.
    The use of contraceptives has become prevalent among females in Thailand in the past 20 years, and oral contraceptive use has been suggested to trigger changes in fat intake, energy expenditure, fat metabolism and blood pressure. Based on field investigations of 391 married women aged 20 years or over in Yasothon Province, North-east Thailand, this study aims to elucidate the effects of oral contraceptive use on body mass index (BMI: kg/m2 ) and blood pressure, taking into account reproductive histories and (...)
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  22. Abortion, Contraception, Infanticide.Philip E. Devine - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (226):513 - 520.
  23.  28
    Doctor contraceptive‐prescribing behaviour and women's attitudes towards contraception: two European surveys.Dominic Grove & David J. Hooper - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):493-502.
  24.  28
    Contraception and Conscientious Objection.Robert L. Kinney - 2012 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12 (4):675-696.
    The 2012 contraception mandate issued by the US Department of Health and Human Services has intensified the debate over a health care practitioner’s right to conscientiously object to providing contraception. This paper approaches the debate over conscientious objection to contraception from a pharmacist’s standpoint. It shows that contraception is the cause of or a contributing factor to observed psychosocial suffering and is not “preventive health care” as labeled. It argues not only that a pharmacist should have (...)
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  25. Contraception and the Natural Law.Germain G. Grisez - 1964
     
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  26.  39
    Contraception and the Natural Law.Stratford Caldecott - 1990 - The Chesterton Review 16 (3/4):392-400.
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  27. If contraception is ethically permissible, then so is early-term abortion.Jeff Mitchell - 2010 - Think 9 (25):39-45.
    In the essay I argue that the routine use of contraception is morally tantamount to early-term abortion because it produces the same result: namely, it prevents the creation of a human life that would have otherwise probably taken place. Because it can be shown that contraception is ethically acceptable, it follows that early-term abortion is as well.
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  28. Harm or Mere Inconvenience? Denying Women Emergency Contraception.Carolyn McLeod - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):11-30.
    This paper addresses the likely impact on women of being denied emergency contraception (EC) by pharmacists who conscientiously refuse to provide it. A common view—defended by Elizabeth Fenton and Loren Lomasky, among others—is that these refusals inconvenience rather than harm women so long as the women can easily get EC somewhere else nearby. I argue from a feminist perspective that the refusals harm women even when they can easily get EC somewhere else nearby.
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  29.  22
    Oral contraceptive non-compliance in rural bangladesh.M. Asaduzzaman Khan - 2004 - Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (6):647-661.
    This paper examines incorrect use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in rural Bangladesh by using data from an OC compliance survey. Of the 1031 current users of OCs interviewed, about 13% took their pills out of sequence, while 17% left incorrect intervals between pill packs. Forty per cent of the women reported missing one active pill during the 6 months prior to the survey, and 74% of them took correct action with the missed pill. Of the women who missed two active (...)
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  30.  14
    Contraception and eugenics.A. Spencer Paterson - 1944 - The Eugenics Review 36 (3):105.
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  31. Conscientious Objection, Emergency Contraception, and Public Policy.Robert F. Card - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):53-68.
    Defenders of medical professionals’ rights to conscientious objection (CO) regarding emergency contraception (EC) draw an analogy to CO in the military. Such professionals object to EC since it has the possibility of harming zygotic life, yet if we accept this analogy and utilize jurisprudence to frame the associated public policy, those who refuse to dispense EC would not have their objection honored. Legal precedent holds that one must consistently object to all forms of the relevant activity. In the case (...)
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  32. What is it to Share Contraceptive Responsibility?Emmalon Davis - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):489-499.
    There are three stages at which procreative outcomes can be prevented or altered: (1) prior to conception (2) during pregnancy and (3) after birth. Daniel Engster (Soc Theory Pract 36(2):233–262, 2010) has ably argued that plans to prevent or alter procreative outcomes at stages (2) and (3)—through abortion and adoption—introduce financial, physical, and emotional hardships to which women are disproportionately vulnerable. In this paper, I argue that plans to prevent or alter undesirable procreative outcomes at stage (1)—through contraception use—similarly (...)
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  33.  54
    Humanae Vitae and Licit Contraception?Patrick J. Coffey - 1988 - Philosophy and Theology 3 (2):172-182.
    This paper critiques John Noonan’s recent attempt to show the compatibility of Humanae Vitae and contraception. Although Noonan’s arguments are rejected, an alternate approach for showing that sort of compatibility is explored.
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  34.  13
    La contraception d’urgence chez les mineures. Une offre illimitée en manque d’évaluation.Florence Taboulet - 2018 - Médecine et Droit 2018 (149):31-38.
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  35.  43
    Contraception in Research: A Policy Suggestion.Toby L. Schonfeld & Bruce G. Gordon - 2005 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (2):15.
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  36.  13
    Contraceptives in the Third World.Donald Warwick - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (4):9-12.
  37.  4
    Contraceptive Research: Do Sex Partners Have Rights?Angela R. Holder - 1982 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 4 (2):6.
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  38.  25
    Contraception and the natural law.S. J. John L. Russell - 1969 - Heythrop Journal 10 (2):121–134.
  39.  4
    Testing Contraceptives.J. A. Johnston - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (3):4-28.
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  40.  36
    Contraception as a test case for the development of doctrine.Osb M. John Farrelly - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (3):453–472.
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  41. Is Contraception Contralife?: A Critique of Grisez et al.Kevin Rickert - 1992 - Lyceum 4 (1):19-38.
     
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  42.  8
    Contraception and abortion in the French Antilles (Guadeloupe and Martinique, 1964-1975). [REVIEW]Michelle Zancarini-Fournel - 2019 - Clio 50:87-108.
    L’article se propose de voir comment ont été promus par les gouvernements de la Ve République la contraception et l’avortement en Guadeloupe et Martinique entre 1964 et 1975. La volonté de différencier la métropole (politique nataliste) des Antilles (politique néo-malthusienne) a été battue en brèche par le refus de l’Église et de certains partis politiques antillais. Les féministes ont dénoncé ces différences de politique. La contraception a été par ailleurs encouragée par des associations et des médecins soucieux d’améliorer (...)
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  43.  33
    Contraception use and associations with intimate partner violence among women in bangladesh.Koustuv Dalal, Johanna Andrews & Suraya Dawad - 2012 - Journal of Biosocial Science 44 (1):83-94.
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  44.  14
    Contraceptives Abroad.Michael Carder, S. Bruce Schearer & Donald P. Warwick - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (6):4-4.
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  45.  26
    Long-Acting Contraceptives for Adolescents.John E. Fitzgerald - 2016 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 16 (1):63-81.
    In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics published its policy statement on contraception for adolescents, which provides, in effect, a mandate to temporarily sterilize all adolescents with long-acting reversible contraceptives for five to ten years. The author reviews the AAP guidelines and their effects on Catholic adolescents, their families, and adolescent health care providers. He then discusses medicolegal issues raised by the policy, outlines Catholic strategies for combating it, and proposes a diocese-based physician-led program for teaching and counseling elementary (...)
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  46.  36
    Monogamy, contraception and the cultural and reproductive success hypothesis.William Irons - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):295-296.
  47.  15
    Contraception and the Person.Paul F. deLadurantaye - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (1):33-43.
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  48.  21
    Contraception: Natural, Artificial, Moral.Snježana Prijić-Samaržija - 2011 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 31 (2):277-290.
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  49.  17
    Contraceptive method choice in the Philippines, 1973–83.Zelda Zablan, Minja Kim Choe, James A. Palmore, Tauseef Ahmed, Adelamar Alcantara & Kathryn Kost - 1989 - Journal of Biosocial Science 21 (S11):61-74.
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  50.  26
    Contraceptive risk-taking and norms of chastity.Anna Stubblefield - 1996 - Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (3):81-100.
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